Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Product Reviews

Product reviews for singers from The Modern Vocalist World.

38 articles in this category

Robert Lunte, of The Vocalist Studio and The Four Pillars of Singing shares some details about the Audio VX5, condenser microphone. Purchase the Audix VX5 here: http://www.TheVocalGearStore.com.     Description T…

Read more...
David Hilderman reveals what matters most when you’re choosing PA speakers for a small or medium sized venue. There’s a lot of advertizing hype about speakers – especially in relation to “watts” – but what are the specs that really matter…

Read more...
Ever wanted to add some sparkle to your mic cable? Item: Neutrik crystalCON, Decorative Mic Cable Connectors Price: $18 (US), £15 (UK) (per connector) Mic Rating: 4/5 At A Glance: Neutrik’s crystalCON r…

Read more...
Read more > (over on our sister site: MusicMakerApps.com)  

Read more...
Hi all, I've been a-looking for a lo-fi mic for sometime now to use in the studio and, mainly, live (some of you may have read my endless posts on other forums). I finally came across the Wasaphone I on eBay and I absolutely love it. I just wanted …

Read more...
In my quest for the perfect recording setup, I was pleased to discover an audio recording solution that minimizes the amount of gear I require to produce my YouTube content. I create educational videos on an almost daily basis and having a simple an…

Read more...
INTRODUCING THE TC HELICON VOICE LIVE TOUCH 2 They call it a "Vocal-Designer". Interesting, I thought to myself while unpacking the TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 from its box. As the name implies TC-Helicon has released a new version of its innov…

Read more...
INTRODUCING THE TC HELICON HARMONY SINGER I would argue that the TC-Helicons pedal style vocal effects are some of the best ideas to come out of their facility in Vancouver, BC. They are small form factor, intuitive to control and easy to get a …

Read more...
Recently a new platform for music professionals called Music Gateway was launched. Music Gateway is a business platform connecting music professionals from around the globe in one simple, easy to use website. It's not so much a LinkedIn of the musi…

Read more...
RODE Microphones brings the big guns to iOS with the iXY RODE i-XY Podcast However good they claim to be I've always been a bit leary of using iOS devices along with the loads of 3rd party plug-in devices for anything remotely related to audio.  M…

Read more...
Kick the nasties coating your mic to the curb with Mic Wipes INTRODICUNG MIC CHECK WIPES  If you ever find yourself in the situation of being at the mercy of using a crusty club mic then you're going to want to know about Mic Check Mic Wipes. B…

Read more...
Throw out your vintage effects, this mic does it better. You can find Placid Audio products on Vocal Gear Store.     Most of the time in either a live or studio situati on when I'm looking to give a vocal track a bit more of a distinctive sound…

Read more...
Could the TC Helicon Mic Mechanic replace all your live voice processing? Do me a favor to start off by closing your eyes and picturing two things:  Swiss army knives and sport utility vehicles.  Now ask yourself what comes to mind?  General all-p…

Read more...
PUTTING THE RODE PODCASTER USB MICROPHONE TO THE TEST While USB microphones have been out on the scene for quite some time now they've more or less been relegated to the lower pro-consumer end of the spectrum as multipurpose general recording…

Read more...
TESTING THE HERCULES MS401B STAND   Order Hercules MS401B Stand from The Vocal Gear Store  At the start of the 1900's when Henry Ford was introducing the Ford Model T, a "car for the masses" he once quipped during an interview that "A…

Read more...
USING THE NUVOICE PL-2 WIRELESS MICROPHONE PLUG -ON TRANSMITTER   In the course of a rehearsal, recording session, or live performance I occasionally find myself thinking wouldn't it be nice if I had an X. Letter X being fill in the blank for wha…

Read more...
TESTING THE EX-25 ISOLATION HEADPHONES FOR RECORDING In any recording environment, the elimination of unwanted noise is essential to achieving a quality recording. Undesired noise can often "bleed" or leak out of studio headphones during the recor…

Read more...
What Are The Effects Of Singers Tea?   Ask any vocalist what one of the keys to staying fresh vocally is and undoubtedly hydration will be on the short list.  While each has their own opinion as to what might work best IN said liquid, generally…

Read more...
SHOULD YOU PROTECT YOUR WIRELESS MIC WITH THIS GATOR CASE? Wit h the sheer amount of capital tied up into gigging  gear  it goes without saying that  p ortability and protection is paramount. When wireless mic systems can cost upwards and bey…

Read more...
  Putting The TC-Helicon MP-75 To The Test If somehow you hadn't noticed there has been an absolute explosion over the last 5 years of excellent professional quality vocal gear designed to give the modern vocalist absolute control over his or her …

Read more...
Testing The Lampifier 711 In a vast sea of dynamic stage mics, it's not often that a manufacturer stands out for being as practical and refreshingly innovative as Lampifier Microphones. Most microphone companies release new m odels which feature twe…

Read more...
When shopping around for a live vocal microphone, I had never really considered trying out a condenser mic, as the vast majority of vocal mics out there are dynamics. While I have used plenty of great sounding dynamic mics, I always thought it …

Read more...
Putting The TC Helicon VoiceTone T1 To The Test If you were following The Modern Vocalist Journal earlier this year with the debut TMVJ Product Reviews, some of you may recall the review of the  TC Helicon D1 VoiceTone pedal.  The VoiceTone Singl…

Read more...
Telefunken Company History And The CU-29 Copperhead Microphone Telefunken has long been a name synonymous with high-grade professional audio equipment. Dating back to the turn of the 20th century Telefunken was founded in Berlin, Germany in 1903 …

Read more...
Should The EV PL80a Be Your Choice Of Vocal Mic? Choosing a live vocal mic is a personal thing for most vocalists. Every voice is unique and different mics accentuate different qualities that can bring out the best or worst in a singer. In additi…

Read more...
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
  • Member Statistics

    16,911
    Total Members
    503
    Most Online
    Sean
    Newest Member
    Sean
    Joined


  • Review My Singing

  • Articles

  • Recent Posts

    • Susanna Hoffs. I guess autocorrect took over in a very odd way.
    • Thanks for replying!  Awesome I will keep practicing like I am. I've never heard of Suanna Hoffs but I am really interested to hear her now :3 Thanks so much and I will do a song in my higher range then and comment it here, I would love to hear your feedback on it  
    • Much more controlled! I like the high note near the end too. Your voice reminds me of Susanna Hoffs (The Bangles) for some reason. I think you have a similar timbre. She puts a lot more air in her voice, resulting in a bit of grit too, but your voice reminds me of an almost punk-ish version of her - like a cross between Susanna Hoffs and Hayley Williams (Paramore). Great job! I would love to hear more in your higher range, especially getting into belting.
    • I tried to practice improving my resonance like you said to but I'm not sure if I'm getting it or not. Do you think I'm on the right track or am I not getting it at all? 
         
    • Hey thanks for the feedback Draven Grey! I was just practicing singing with a horizontal mouth kinda closed thing you said to do, and I actually do sound better and more 'pop'. I was really surprised so thank you so much I think this will really help. Also no I'm not really training at the moment other than some scales and stuff so I will check out the four pillars of singing now. 
    • Having a well-rehearsed band definitely makes a difference! How are you arranging a band live currently? Backing tracks can definitely make a huge difference too, but, as you said, can come across a bit cheesy. However, it's all in how you do them. My drummer always plays to a click, along with backing tracks. But teh backing tracks are just that, backing. We try to make sure anything that stands out is being played/sang live (even if along with the backing). For instance, we have 3 or 4 guitar parts, but 1 guitarist. He chooses the most prominent guitar part to play live. Bacling vocals also have 3 to 4 parts, but someone is always singing along with them. Keyboards are on backing tracks unless there's a prominent piano part of synth lead. Another way I've seen it done is making a spectacle of having a backing track. I've seen the lead singer of a punk band do a solo performance on acoustic guitar. He set up a stool next to him with a mic'ed tape recorder. Pressing play gave him a light rhythm part and backing vocals, and everyone loved it. On a bigger scale, Trent reznor did the same when he performed on piano. All his beats and strings were on a boom box, placed on top of the piano. In a band setting, I've mostly seen it done with vocals and keys, even on a pro level. Tesseeract's last singer, Ashe,  had very lush harmonies, but no one else was singing. Van Halen did an entire tour without a keyboardist, only keys on backing. Granted, one screw up on their song Jump, and it went viral in a bad way. The backing tracks were out of key. I've also seen some big label guys have people on stage with them faking it. Sadly, it was obvious. The point is, backing tracks can work, if you find other ways to make the performance interesting and don't try to pretend it's live.
    • Welcome, MikeyA18   The opportunity to request a review of your singing is FREE.   A guaranteed review requires a reasonable fee of $20.  Here is the link for a guaranteed review.  http://www.themodernvocalistworld.com/store/product/12-review-my-singing/    Respectfully, Adolph
    • Welcome, Atlanta  The opportunity to request a review of your singing is FREE.   A guaranteed review requires a reasonable fee of $20.  Here is the link for a guaranteed review.  http://www.themodernvocalistworld.com/store/product/12-review-my-singing/    Respectfully, Adolph
    • I'm not really having any vocal issues but I do have issues performing it at live shows due to drummers not knowing how to play the song on the drums and people not able to sing the backing vocals. I've thought about using a minus track but that might seem to cheesy.
    • Like we've said before, you have a VERY particular style. Very unique and pretty damn cool. On the top end, your voice is reminiscent of Robert Smith. Is there something in particular you feel you're struggling with in this song, or something about your voice you would like to work on?
    • Your pitch is great! That's 90% of singing! Your technique is fine for choir, but I'm not sure it's where you want it for contemporary singing. You have a lot of great potential, and I'm really looking forward to what you're able to do with your voice as you keep training. I like the little nuances in your voice that set you apart, such as some of your pronunctiation choices. You have a long way to go, but this is an incredible start. I also don't know more than the very basics of vocal fach, since it doesn't really apply to contemporary voice, and thus dosn't apply to my students. I wish I could help more on that side of things. There are some here who can. On your technique: Are you currently training? Like I said, your pitch is on, which gets you most of the way there. However, your breath support, anchoring, resonant placement, etc, are not stable. They move constantly, most falling back to a more "singing from the throat" that I've seen with a lot of my students who took lessons in their teens from teachers who either didn't know at all what they were teaching, or didn't know how to teach contemporary singing. You really need to be training, if you're truly serious about your voice. I highly recommend checking out The Four Pillars of Singing, linked to in the footer of this forum. One thing you can do, in order to start getting better resonant placement in general, is to starting tracking (humming and buzzing the lips) all the time. And I mean ALL THE TIME. It will help you engage the constrictors better and get you used to a better esonant placement. I also often have students hold a finger on their bottom lip and try to sing up and over it, to experience a similar resonant placement. The idea is to lift the voice out of the throat and onto the soft palate (perhaps edged toward the hard palate), much like what happens when you smile. And speaking of smiling, another thing that helps lift the voice is your embouchure (mouth piece or shape of your mouth). When you open vertically, especially wide, it puts a lot of pressure on your vocal folds, which you compensate for by modifying your vowel further back, and your resonance ends up falling out of place. If you focus more on opening horizontally instead, baring your teeth, you'll keep the voice lifted and anchor things down better. Like I said, great start! A lot of unique qualities to your voice! Keep it up!    
    • I'm, unsurprisingly, 100% in agreement with Robert. I adore your voice. Absolutely incredible. For those low notes, it might be worth attempting a few things to stabilize: Bring the voice more forward, edging, harsher, and then open to more air, which naturally modifies to a more curbing position. Dampen the larynx a bit more to taste, while adding slightly more breath support and locking down on the diaphragm. Do tuning exercises downward. This has been incredbly helpful with my female students who want to sing lower.  Start with tuning slides E4 to A3, working your way down in half steps (D#4 to G#3, D4 to G3, etc). The main point is tuning as your voice and pitch moves. By tuning, I mean paying very close attention to a well balanced placement, musculature, support, and anchoring. For the higher notes, do you feel relaxed or like you're pushing? It sounds great, but I know that sound can be produced by either pushing a LOT of air/volume, or by relaxing completely and adjusting tiny things (like vocal twang and jaw placement) to get the same sound color. I've blown out my voice before from pushing too hard. I would hate to see that happen to you.