Willise

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About Willise

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  1. http://www.newyorkvocalcoaching.com/ Justin Stoney has a studio in NYC - seems to focus on SLS type singing. He also has many youtube videos.
  2. Murray Head is a very hard act to follow, especially in this iconic song. I think you did a good job! My only critique would be the emotion of the song seemed to be lacking compared to the original. I could never sing that song, so take what I say as a grain of salt!:)
  3. I had lessons with Eli - great guy! His method is a lot like Jaime Venderra's. No hesitation in recommending him at all. Phil Moufarrege is also a great coach which you may want to consider.
  4. This seems to give some insight on the straw exercise.
  5. I also take lessons from Phil, but I do it for a different reason that a lot of people I read posts from on the forum, so my perspective may be different. I am almost 46 and have worked for 25 years in a very busy ATC unit doing shift work the whole time. My sleeping pattern is terrible LOL. I am not looking to be a great lead singer and go on tour. I play 7 instruments in my band and just want to sing for the fun of it, but I want to sound good. I find that real, quality practice does take a lot of time. I try to do the exercises every day, but it is near impossible. Then when I do them, I sometimes get frustrated because I can't do a stacatto AH past F4 without cracking. It is hard to stay motivated when that is happening. But I find the absolute best thing for me is what Owen mentioned. I forget the exercises for a few days and just sing songs that are within my range, but trying to keep the bright sound that Phil does in his lessons. For me, the mundane lesson is replaced with a very enjoyable experience, while still receiving some of the lesson benefit. As for feeling like you aren't improving big time, I see this all the time in my trainees at work. They work their ass off to get where they are, then they plateau. They hit a wall in their training and they just can't get over the next hurdle. I believe this happens in every type of training. Singing is no different. And just like my trainees, you will get over the hurdle. Don't expect too much too quickly and it will come. Sorry if I rambled LOL - it's in the wee morning hours and I'm getting ready to go to work :)
  6. That series of New York Vocal Coaching are really great.
  7. Of course. When you said "CD player" in your original post, the old school in me thought of an actual CD player not a CD drive. :lol:
  8. Why not just rip the CD's using Itunes into MP3 files for your computer?
  9. I always record my Skype lessons. I find it helpful to go over them in between sessions.
  10. I was thinking the same thing while reading this thread. Even SLS describes correct breathing technique as "When you breathe in, the diaphragm descends and the belly extends. When you exhale, the diaphragm raises and the belly falls back into place". Is that not the essence of "correct" breathing in a nutshell? All the other terms like "taking a dump", "power push", "bear down" just seem to confuse me. To do any of those sensations, one must strain, which we always read is not a good thing. I bought a PTD-1, which has helped me immensely to get the correct breathing technique, but the release of the breath correctly continues to be elusive to me.
  11. I am going to commit myself to performing a song in public this year! I've been on stage hundreds of times performing, but never singing. It's terrifying as hell for some reason, but I'm going to do it. Anyone else with a crazy resolution for the new year? Back to my breathing exercises....
  12. That was amazing! Here is a video of a good friend of mine doing the same song. She is classically trained and we grew up together. She took to the vocals while I took to instruments. Now I'm trying to catch up to her! LOL It's from facebook so I hope you can access it.
  13. While searching around for information on the Goo, Gee, and Hung exercise, I came across this ebook called "Resonance in Singing and Speaking" It is an older book, but I found it to be an interesting read nonetheless. Here is the link in case anyone wants to check it out http://www.gutenberg.org/files/19138/19138-h/19138-h.htm#PREFACE I think it is available in epub and kindle format as well, but the full book is online at the link above.
  14. Love that term - it is so accurate. Unfortunately, mine is even lower than that - F4-C5. But I'll get there someday - no rush.
  15. I've been sick with pneumonia for the last week or so, so in my quest to understand all I can about technique, I downloaded the SATA book. It's a fascinating read. I've read it through, quickly, twice and now I'm rereading it slower and trying some of the exercises. It is really unfortunate that the CD audio files are no longer available. Anyway, my question with respect to retraction is the issue of tension. I can do the retraction quite easily if I concentrate on it, but it does take some effort to hold that position. Is that counterproductive to the generally accepted notion of having the throat tension free? To put it in perspective, the tension I am talking about is not like a clenched fist, but more like the tension of a finger snap - fairly minimal. Secondly, once you have the retraction accomplished, how do you maintain compression on the true folds? Do they naturally stay together and compression is totally dependent on air flow pressure? Thanks everyone - can't wait to get back to lessons!!