Kevin Richards

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Kevin Richards last won the day on February 12

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About Kevin Richards

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    Subject Matter Expert & Review Specialist
  • Birthday June 14

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    http://www.rpmvocalstudio.com

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  1. If you noticed I used the words "for now". Its not needed right away, it can come later. Getting a good visualization of the sound in the mind's eye is the first step. Knowing what "TA involvement" means isn't going to help anyone since you cannot see, nor directly control those muscles; they are controlled through reproducing a sound that activates them. You then experiment with the sound. The nomenclature is OK to learn later on, but in the early stages its more about sound and feel; as that is what we as humans are most familiar with.
  2. Robert, That is why I used the words "help you achieve the End Result now. " (now being the key word) We've had this discussion before privately, but I'll repeat it for our viewers at home. I'm NOT against learning terminology or the physical process, but in my experience throwing terms like "tuning the formant" or "semi-occluded phonation" at someone carries no relevance if they haven't come close to feeling the sensation of the movement first. Learning the refined process of the coordination will help them focus and control the coordination later on. Gross Motor Control precedes Fine Motor Control in the learning process of the brain. (Stand>Walk>Run) "Wax On, Wax Off" from 'The Karate Kid' is a great example of learning the gross movement first. That is all. Signing off from beautiful Uptown New York City.
  3. The idea now is balance. Now that you know the two extremes - very forward, overly bright "Masky" sound and the more "droopy" or dopey sound - you can find the midway point. The forward bright sound gets the range to go up but it lacks compression or cord closure. The dopey sound has the compression from the dampened larynx but it carries too much weight or lower resonance. Strike a balance between the two by using the exercise word "Law". The "aw" sound strikes a good balance of edgy resonance and dampened compression by combining the properties of both the "ah" and "uh" sounds. If you feel its too "heavy", tilt the resonance forward to open the sound more toward "ah"; if its too bright and/or lacks compression - tilt the sound back toward the "uh" feeling. With experimentation you'll find the right balance for your abilities at this stage of development. As the coordination becomes stronger, you can lean on the "uh" feeling more and add some depth to your upper mix area (F4-Bb4).
  4. I will chime in here. I would say, for now, forget all the terminology (TA musculature, formant tuning, semi occluded phonation) and concentrate on the sound you want. Your "End Result". Knowing all the physiology or terms IS NOT going to help you achieve the End Result now. Knowing how to manipulate the sound and feeling of your voice WILL. Listening to recordings can be VERY deceiving. You are listening to a voice that has been recorded through a $3,000 microphone, into expensive pre-amps, compressed, EQ'd, aural excited etc. Its a very different vocal than what came out of the mouth. What you hear as "loud" may not have been originally. Its been processed to sound big. A good example is "Happy" by Pharrell Williams. That's an extremely weak vocal that's been processed in the studio to sound full. With that being said, you can pick up some clues as to what singers are doing if you know what to listen for. The singer in question is singing in a light, heady mixed voice with good closure. He is blending nicely between lower mix and upper mix without his tone changing much. (A good indicator that his closure/compression is consistent). What some are describing as a "chesty" tone is just a good mixing of both mouth and nasal resonances (the upper 2/3rds of your pharynx/throat), without losing compression. The "trick" is developing balanced compression without adding or pulling too much throat resonance as you go from your lower range to the mid and upper portions. Someone suggested SS/SLS exercises. I agree, as this is the very type of "light mix" singing is what that method is designed to produce. Exercises like a "Mum" or "Nah" on a 5 tone scale - ascending or descending. I also like "Yuh" or "Vah" or "Nuh" on that as it keeps your resonance out of the throat and more "Masky". If you like visual examples, I have a YouTube playlist on Mixed Voice https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNvaKcRmv_1ShEEu86hIuKO74E9pYr0RL Keep us informed of your progress. It will take some time to get this light coordination fairly good, so let it. Kevin Richards http://www.rpmvocalstudio.com 5-tone-scale.mp3
  5. Technically your entire vocal range is a mix of resonances at all times. This is what confuses people about the term "mix voice". Most people refer to it as just that area between their speaking vocal range and head resonance. And there lies the issue. Segmenting the voice into parts is what gets 99% of singers into trouble. They create false areas of transition, false registers, false modes. The voice is a constant mix of three resonances - throat, mouth and sinus. The lower you sing, the more throat resonance is heard, the "higher" you sing, the more sinus resonance is heard in the sound. Mixing is a way to blend your voice seamlessly between these three main resonance shifts. I heard some chest pulling on a few notes here and there, but when you did the improvised "ow" you're closer to a better upper mix sound than when you're singing the song. You're in the ballpark through of mixing/blending your resonance in the right proportions to get the result you want.
  6. Agree on most points brought up here. Before approaching the F4 and anything above that - make sure your notes below that (C4-E4) are clean, solid, have a core and feel relaxed in the throat. You should be most of the engagement from the mid body area, not the neck. Your issue is thinking you need more air to sing higher - nope. It takes less air to sing higher, but the air is more refined/targeted because the smaller glottal opening producing the tone. Pay attention to how much compression you use on the D4 and apply that to the notes above. Tweak ONLY if it needs it. Makes sure your face looks relaxed. A distorted face is a telltale sign of a poorly executed phonation. If lessening the air causes distortion, hold back the sound more. Think in the opposite direction of the sound. This will create more glottal compression and reduce the rasp. But be cheap with the throttling back - too much and you'll choke off the sound. Experiment. Most of voice training is discovery through trial and error.
  7. 1. Show ME where I am confused on falsetto and head voice. Show me. Do it. Because I'm not. 2. The video you reference was me in the recording studio singing AC/DC (not my own song) and its a reference vocal for the band not the final take AND you're hearing my voice in a dead environment and without the musical reference to what I'm singing. Get your facts straight. 3. I've appeared on numerous radio jingles, sang to over 50,000 in the Summer of 1996 on a tour of Asia and Europe opening for "Royal Hunt", have sung on numerous Grammy producers demos - and none of them have ever caught on that I sing tense, have problems with melody, intonation or tonality. Strange isn't it? My critique and further comments for Joe were fair. Some may be uncomfortable for others to read but I'm being 100% honest in my assessment and in the end trying to help Joe and protect my industry. But your assessment of the song was correct. It did sound like Joe did not know the song very well.
  8. Joe, your site and course have been known to coaches for a while. Long before your post. Remember, its OUR business so we are constantly seeking out any and all new competition. I just helped Robert squash a coach in Singapore for saying they could teach his TVS methodology when they had no permission to do so. If coaches are out there online, I find them. I'm quite good at it being that I was in IT for close to 10 years before teaching voice.
  9. Joe - "Methinks thou protest too much". Your VERY long answer is a perfect indication you're not as sure footed as you'd want us to all believe. Your long list of supposed accomplishments You see Joe, I DO know what you teach as I bought your course under another name. I have every vocal course on the market. Why? No the competition. I have a pretty good idea what you know in terms of depth of knowledge on the subject. How you sing is also a glaring indication of your overall abilities. The choices you made artistically show me a lot. Understand that this is our livelihood and we are constantly having to answer for people like yourself who feel they can just put out product because they can. If you're going to step in our ballpark, be prepared to play against heavy hitters. Robert and I were both teachers for many years before deciding to create courses for the public. We spent a long time learning the craft of teaching, creating a methodology and gaining experience with people. I don't see that from you. So you took a couple of courses and have read some books. And...? How many students have you taught consistently for at least 2-3 years? What is your methodology? Your pedagogy on voice? You see, Robert and I are trying to raise the bar on training singers but someone with your inexperience trying to step into our profession raises huge red flags. You don't understand the business, and it is a business. You're not comprehending what you're doing to the profession overall. Robert and myself commenting the way we are is not personal. It's business. Our business. Any new kind on the block is going to scrutinized and forced to prove they have the muster. Frankly, I don't see it. Yet. You should stay below the radar, teaching students regularly for a few years, gaining experience, gaining insight - before going anywhere near trying to teach the public. Having taken a few courses and having read some books simply isn't enough. Myself and Robert were students of voice for at least 20 years before putting out product. You're jumping in water way over your head at this point Take a step back and reassess.
  10. I am disappointed that Robert deleted that portion of my comment that dealt with you having a vocal course because it's an important point that I made. Your intentions to offer a lower priced alternative to more expensive courses may be noble, but in the end you hurt the business overall by offering a sort of "Made in China" knockoff. It lessens the market value for more qualified teachers and more comprehensive courses. It also makes people less likely to buy courses from myself, Robert, Ken, Brett etc. because they see a lower price. They get the course, realize it's not out together by a professional teacher and they become disillusioned about buying vocal courses from anyone else. Cheaper doesn't equal better - just as more expensive doesn't equal quality. To offer a course for money, one MUST be an expert in that chosen field - be good at it and able to demonstrate it effectively. Interpretation is fine and actually necessary for a singer to grow. As an example; Frank Sinatra was the King of interpretation in terms of his phrasing, and arrangements of songs but the overall emotional intent of the song always remained. If you wanted to really interpret "Silent Lucidity" differently, you have to use different music. Singing some wild interpretation over a karaoke track of the original song simply makes it too opposite.
  11. I was just sent the link to this thread and have given said track a listen. This is not about interpretation - this is flat out amateur in too manyways. I'm sorry if you expected me to coddle Joe; the truth has to be said here. The song performance of this is below average. If a singing student sent this to me for review I would say the same thing. Your idea of pitch, melody, rhythm, emotional conveyance need A LOT OF WORK. Its not interpretive, its being somewhat clueless in how to sing a song properly given its subject matter and emotional intent. Needs more work Joe...
  12. View File Vocal Fire Warm Up Vocal Fire Warm UpA proper vocal warm up is essential to maintaining your singing and speaking voice over the course of your lifetime. Professional singers and public speakers have known for hundreds of years that properly preparing the voice before a performance is the only way to inspire confidence and reach a true emotional connection with an audience. Vocal Fire also includes a special cool down routine to help prevent hoarseness and soothe a tired voice. Easy to do "on the go" exercises that effortlessly warm up up your voice without needing vocal scales.How to develop very strong and even breath support - essential for a healthy, balanced voice.Understand the reasons why a proper vocal warm up - done everyday - helps promote a healthy body.Discover voice balancing techniques that clear your voice of bumps and cracks in just minutes.Includes an exclusive 35 minute video with more vocal warm up tips.vocalfire_sample2.mp3 vocalfire_sample1.mp3 Submitter Kevin Richards Submitted 07/11/2015 Category TMV World Teacher Workouts
  13. Version 1.0.0

    7 downloads

    Vocal Fire Warm UpA proper vocal warm up is essential to maintaining your singing and speaking voice over the course of your lifetime. Professional singers and public speakers have known for hundreds of years that properly preparing the voice before a performance is the only way to inspire confidence and reach a true emotional connection with an audience. Vocal Fire also includes a special cool down routine to help prevent hoarseness and soothe a tired voice. Easy to do "on the go" exercises that effortlessly warm up up your voice without needing vocal scales.How to develop very strong and even breath support - essential for a healthy, balanced voice.Understand the reasons why a proper vocal warm up - done everyday - helps promote a healthy body.Discover voice balancing techniques that clear your voice of bumps and cracks in just minutes.Includes an exclusive 35 minute video with more vocal warm up tips.vocalfire_sample2.mp3 vocalfire_sample1.mp3

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  14. Ken studied in Italy for 3 months so I guess he figures that allows him to talk about Bel Canto. Kind of like "I stayed in a Holiday Inn Express" last night.
  15. Yes. If you want to see the worst of humanity... or at least 2nd worst to ISIS... go to YouTube and read some of the comments I DON'T approve some day... about one out of 10 people is nothing but a mean, bitter, nasty individual that is not giving their opinion... they are just making a post to be mean and insulting. I don't approve them. These kinds of posts are not published with me. Its because of the anonymity of YouTube/Twitter etc. People will write the most horrible things they would never say to someone's face because they're cowards. You also have a certain subset of asperger types who can't let that one little mistake go and will relentlessly harp on it. Then you have the jealous who will cut you down because they can't do what you can do. In any event, you can't win with some people.