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Found 28 results

  1. I've been having throatiness problems recently. Like, it hurts and I find myself pushing sometimes, when I sing in head voice, or belt too high. It used to not hurt, even when I sing at the end of my range. But now it's hurting. It might be from doing too much vocal slides. Because I've been doing that a lot recently. I used to do it a lot before too. Back then when I started doing it, I started having throat problems too, and I just assumed vocal slides were causing it and I just stopped. And I returned to normal. Also when I went to voice lesson and warmed up, I didn't do any vocal slides and it didn't hurt to sing at the end of my range. But when I went to practice my head voice at home, I did vocal slides, and my voice started hurting again. Any advice on how to cure this? Thanks.
  2. Hey new to the forum here. I am a developing singer(male baritone) and I have noticed how much a stuffy or half-stuffy/runny nose can impact my range. It is nearly impossible for me to get into my mask/nasal resonance when my nostrils are somewhat swollen due to cold weather. My chest voice would sound almost normal, but as I start to place the air into my nasal region, that stuffiness somewhat pushes the air back down, making me push more air through the chest, thus making it very easy to have unpredictable breaks in the voice as opposed to a day when my nose is clear. Ive had this almost all my life and it actually made me talk more out of my mouth with strain during normal conversation. I was wondering if anyone here had procedures done to reduce the size of the turbinates in your nose(removing parts of the membrane or bone) so the passageway is much wider at all times, or if there is another permanant solution? And if anyone had this surgery, how much did it change your singing voice? Thanks!
  3. I've been training with the foundation building routine religiously for the past week and I'm phonating really great sirens with Embuchore and larynx dampening. But during the sirens there seems to be two routes my voice can take as it rises in frequency. One route is into an airy falsetto, the other is a more stable chesty/twangy sound that I'm now able to carry up to b#4. My question is which route do I take? Am I pulling chest? Is that bad?
  4. I doubt that this has anything to do with training the voice but there is the possibility. I am a small skinny guy 130 pounds tops all my life. I have not been training aggressively but using more support more twang and cord closure. The issue is this, I have noticed that the soft tissue around my neck is swollen, also under my armpits. Normally my armpits are concave and there was a dip between the collar bones and sides of my neck. These areas are now puffy and convex. Earlier in life while working out with shoulder shrugs(holding weights) and other exercises meant to strengthen the neck and shoulder muscles this also happened. That was expected and looked for. Can just using more aggressive singing and stronger support cause these issues?
  5. "White Rabbit" Tribute! I am proud to share a performance and production of Jefferson Airplane's classic, "White Rabbit". SaraEllen has been training with TVS for about two years. Excellent job SaraEllen! LOVE the curbing vowel resonance, steady embouchure, and "snappy" glottal attacks on the vowels, apart from the interpretation that captures the nuances we coached and discussed. Sounds great, looks great, a kick ass production and worthy achievement! Coach.
  6. It started couple of days ago when I tried to sing notes that I sing fine. Those notes became an awful voice... I can't say how it sounded like even on my own language. It was like silent voice mixed with a bit scream. I don't know how my voice damaged or changed in one day. At that day when it happened I was having a little sore throat from the morning to evening after I coughed several times. I think that even if I have caught a cold it can't be the cause of my problem because I it never happened when I had caught a cold(not including times when I had my throat messed up). I'm 18 year old guy and I'm a smoker, I smoke over 1 year what I regret most of all. Also I sing in a band, So guys what do you think will my voice come back in the future? Or please tell me what caused this problem if you can... Thanks in advance.
  7. ( *Laryngoscopy result of my vocal folds Hello fellas out there! This is my first post in this modernvocalistworld forum and as a singer,im really proud to find this kind of forum where i can ask or share something regarding vocas. My name is Rolando and im 17 y/o singer living in Indonesia.I've been singing for many times and i'm really enjoyed it.I was part of a band that have regular concert schedule. So lets get to the point, 6 or 7 months ago,i had a full schedule of concert in one day,so from the morning until the evening i did sing without quality vocal rest,then next morning after that concert,i wake up and i realized that my voice already became breathy and hoarse.I thought it will only occur for 5 days or 7 days but i've been experiencing this damage for 6 or 7 months and i already went to the best ENT doctor on my town and i did a checkup to my vocal cords and that is the result.(on the picture i attached with this post upside) I knew it was all of my fault not to warming up properly and just sing without taking care of my vocal folds,but i'm really stressed to see that my voice is not yet recovered for many months. I already gargled with salt water and did many things as my ENT doctor instructed but it still the same,it breaks my heart. So what is the problem with me? What should i do ? Or is it a permanent and major vocal damage that has no medicine? If singer tea can fix this i will try to buy one. Thanks ^^ Note: I still can speak loud and sing but my singing quality is degradated so much,now i cant hold a note for a long time and my vocal pliabilty has gone aswell,though my vibrato is still clean and good.
  8. I've been teaching a lot of new students lately, so haven't had time to dive into the course as much lately. Granted, I've been teaching the onsets in more of a TVS way now, and have noticed a big improvement on helping my student's get results even faster than before, not just that but pinpoint issues extremely fast too. For myself, it has given me a lot more control over my voice as well, but in ways I didn't know were even an issue. This is exactly the type of program I've been looking for, since I feel I'm already pretty advanced in my singing. I'm writing this just to say thank you for one thing in particular. After learning the lift up/pull back technique, using TVS coordination onsets, and even contract & release (although I overused it at first, ouch, lol!), my opened up my voice more than I thought possible. Before, I could easily sing a C5, even up to an E5 while belting, but only for about 30 minutes before feeling some fatigue. I could even belt up to a G#5 for a very short period. With the fatigue, I figured I was pushing too hard, but didn't know another way. So, with the new album being written, I simply started writing and altering my songs to stay lower in pitch than that. After practicing TVS methodology, I quickly realized just how much a belt is truly just head voice with TA being added. With this realization, I could suddenly control the volume and pressure of my belting much more than before. I can belt the E5 for hours now. To be clear, I know the difference in sensation and sound from a true belt vs. falsetto with twang or added harshness. I haven't ventured much above that, since I currently still fight the urge to push. The last time I belted the G#5, I was teaching a soprano a certain song, and didn't realize how high I was singing until it started hurting 15 minutes in. Then it was too late, I had pulled a muscle and it took me 3 months to recover. Needless to say, I'm overly cautious about belting above the E5 now. Not that I normally sing anything that calls for anything higher than that anyway. I'm very excited about this discovery, and I'm looking forward to the lesson on belting to refine it even more. Thank you for taking the pressure off my upper belt range. This will be extremely important as The Silent Still begins to tour our Rock Circus Masquerade production at the end of this year.
  9. I think I speak really inefficiently. My voice goes, mainly my mix, and my tone completely goes. All the weight comes back in my voice. I really have no idea how to fix this. Lip rolls etc help in the short-term but I think I need to change the way I speak. It's almost as if all the training goes as soon as I start speaking Anyone have any tips?
  10. Hey Rob ! Howzitgoin' ? I'm practicing ( not as much as I would want : Work + daughter and stuff ...) During our lesson, we was reaching an E4 and then came the time to do vowel modifications We went obviously from Eh to a Ah or Uh and you said : Ah is your Trebble knob, Uh is your Bass Knob and said that formants are this : Multiple sound colours at the same time Is that to say that we can have simultaneously Eh+AH+Uh vowels blended together ? or is it just EH+AH or EH+ Uh Simply put : Can we have more than 2 vowels blended together ? If yes, how many of them then ? Question might sound silly, but I was wondering Let me know Thanx
  11. Three and half years ago I decided I wanted to have a deeper voice. I did some research and found an article that suggested saying your ABC's in a deeper voice everyday until your voice became that pitch. THIS WAS A HUGE MISTAKE. It has massively hurt my communication skills and left me sounding very unnatural and unpleasant . After years of trying to correct it by speaking my way back to my naturally voice, going through phases of pain and scratchiness, I think it's as good as it can be without some help from people who know what their doing. I'm coming to this great community for advice on how to get back to my original voice and get on sounding the way I was meant to sound! Sincerely- RecoveringFromTheDeep
  12. belting

    HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. Hey Rob, So I noticed that there is a difference in definitions between TVS and Ken Tamplin's program. Ken Tamplin refers to head voice as a mode; basically a strong reinforced falsetto. WELL, ... IN REGARDS TO THE TRUE DEFINITION OF VOCAL MODES, THAT IS NOT A DEFINITION THAT IS AS ACCURATE AS IT NEEDS TO BE. IF WE ARE GOING TO TALK ABOUT MODES, IT IS BEST TO REFER TO THE ORIGINATORS OF PHYSICAL MODES, THE ESTILLIANS… WHICH IS MORE OR LESS WHAT THE TVS PHYSICAL MODES ARE INSPIRED BY. FALSETTO IS A PHYSICAL MODE, HEAD VOICE IS NOTHING MORE THEN A METAPHOR FOR THE UPPER REGISTER… HEAD VOICE ACTUALLY DOESN’T MEAN ANYTHING, IF YOU WANT TO BE STRICT ABOUT IT. IT IS A “PICTURE WORD” TO REFER TO THE UPPER VOICE SENSATION WE ALL HAVE… TO CALL IT A VOCAL MODE, IS TO CLAIM THAT IT IS A PHYSICAL AND TANGIBLE THING, WHICH IT ISN’T. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS ‘REINFORCED FALSETTO’. THERE IS ONLY A PHYSICAL MODE CALLED FALSETTO AND IT IS CHARACTERIZED BY A WINDY, OPEN GLOTTIS THAT ESCAPES RESPIRATION. IF THE PHONATION DOES NOT HAVE WIND, IT IS NOT FALSETTO. IF YOU “REINFORCE” A PHONATION ON A HIGH NOTE ABOVE THE BRIDGE, IT IS MORE ACCURATELY GOING TO BE VOCAL TWANG… WHICH IS ANOTHER PHYSICAL MODE. In TVS falsetto is a mode, but the head voice is just what you call notes that resonate from the head, in whatever mode you are singing. WELL DONE, THAT IS MORE OR LESS CORRECT. HOWEVER, NOTE THAT THIS DEFINITION OF MODES IS NOT JUST THE WAY TVS SEES IT. IT IS ALSO THE WAY ESTILLIANS AND CVI SEES IT. ESTILL ARE THE ORIGINATORS OF VOCAL MODES, SO PEOPLE THAT CARE TO BE ACCURATE ABOUT VOCAL MODES, TEND TO FOLLOW THEIR ORIGINAL FOUNDATION ON THE TOPIC, WHICH TVS PHYSICAL MODES DO. I prefer the TVS definition. However, I think that makes the whole bridging late vs bridging early debate between the two systems inconsistent. IS THERE A DEBATE? ... OH YA, KTVA WOULD LIKE CONSUMERS TO BELIEVE THERE IS… THERE IS NO DEBATE. TVS HAS BOTH BOTTOM UP AND TOP DOWN TECHNIQUES. THIS IS A TIRED, OLD IDEA THAT STARTED ABOUT FOUR YEARS AGO THAT HAS BEEN PROPAGATED TO CREATE CONFUSION IN THE MARKET ABOUT WHAT TVS STANDS FOR... KTVA HAS GOT A LOT OF MILEAGE OUT OF PROPAGATING THIS MISINFORMATION. IT IS COMPLETELY STUPID AND I HAVE CREATED NO LESS THEN FOUR VIDEOS TO COMBAT THE CONFUSION. Ken's criticism of what he calls late bridging seems more apt to describing some classical voice teachers who teach bridging to a falsetto mode instead of a twang mode, or metal screamers who rely on a distorted reinforced falsetto. His criticism being that early bridging over time breaks down the "mid voice," of which he doesn't define. HE TALKS A GOOD GAME AND CERTAINLY SINGS A GOOD GAME… BUT WITH ALL DUE RESPECT, IN MY OPINION AND FROM FEEDBACK FROM HIS CUSTOMERS, HE DOESN’T ALWAYS DEFINE OR EXPLAIN A GOOD GAME. IN REGARDS TO EARLY BRIDGING AND VOCAL ATROPHY… ON THIS POINT, I AGREE WITH KEN. THE LACK OF BOTTOM UP TRAINING WILL RESULT IN WEAK TA MUSCLE STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE. BOTTOM TRAINING IS ESSENTIAL TO BELTING, BUT ALSO JUST TO BASIC VOCAL HEALTH. THIS IS WHY THE NEW 4PILLARS SYSTEM HAS AN EXTENSIVE BOTTOM-UP AND BELT TRAINING EXPLANATIONS AND ROUTINES. With the TVS definition, I'd say I mostly bridge early. But it's not such a big difference it seems. I can still bring a bigger boomier sound up higher, but from learning early bridging techniques, I'm not stuck to an overly heavy phonation with constriction. It's dynamic and free. PRECISELY!!!!!!!!!!! YOU NEED BOTH APPROACHES! DIFFERENT PEOPLE NEED DIFFERENT APPROACHES BASED ON THEIR NEEDS. YOU DESCRIBED THOSE NEEDS NICELY. I TOTALLY AGREE. KNOW THIS… THE REASON ANY COACH WOULD BE LIGHT ON TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES IS SIMPLY BECAUSE TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES ARE MORE COMPLICATED TO UNDERSTAND AND TEACH. IT IS A LOT EASIER TO TEACH BOTTOM-UP TECHNIQUES. TOP-DOWN TECHNIQUES REQUIRE MORE PRECISION AND MORE UNDERSTANDING OF THE MUSCULATURE AND OTHER DETAILS. "PUSH FROM THE BOTTOM UP ON AN AH VOWEL"... IS A FAR EASIER STORY TO TELL, THEN BUILDING FROM INSIDE THE HEAD VOICE. I think part of the confusion also stems from the SLS / singing success terms, where the mixed voice is their term for twang, and head voice is defined as a strong falsetto. WHICH IS AN AWFUL DEFINITION OF TWANG… AND PAINFULLY INCORRECT. AGAIN, IF ANY OF THESE PEOPLE, WOULD BOTHER TO STUDY VOCAL MODES AS I HAVE, THEY WOULD NOT BE TALKING INACCURACIES TO CONSUMERS. SLS AND SS SEEM LIKE THE LEAST INFORMED TEACHERS SOMETIMES. TO BE SURE, THEY ARE NOT TRAINED IN VOCAL MODES AND ARE WAY OF COURSE WHEN IT COMES TO BELTING. VERY FEW PEOPLE WILL EVER BUILD A STRONG TOP REGISTER BELT WITH "SING LIKE YOU SPEAK" TYPE METHODS. It's kind of silly considering the actually mixed resonance we feel is only from around c4 to E4. Mixed voice is just a bad term. YEP… THAT IS WHY I KILLED IT IN MY “MIXED VOICE IS DEAD!” VIDEO… IT IS A TERM THAT SOME TEACHERS USE TO KEEP THEIR STUDENTS CONFUSED. THE MORE YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STUDENTS CONFUSED, THE LESS YOU HAVE TO REALLY UNDERSTAND YOUR SUBJECT MATTER AND BE ABLE TO REALLY EXPLAIN THINGS AS A TEACHER. Am I understanding this right? TOM, I THINK YOU HAVE A LOT OF THIS PRETTY SQUARED AWAY. IT SEEMS THE TVS CONTENT IS HELPING YOU TO SORT THIS ALL OUT, WHICH IS GREAT. Tom
  13. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. Hey Rob, So I noticed that there is a difference in definitions between TVS and Ken Tamplin's program. Ken Tamplin refers to head voice as a mode; basically a strong reinforced falsetto. WELL, ... IN REGARDS TO THE TRUE DEFINITION OF VOCAL MODES, THAT IS NOT A DEFINITION THAT IS AS ACCURATE AS IT NEEDS TO BE. IF WE ARE GOING TO TALK ABOUT MODES, IT IS BEST TO REFER TO THE ORIGINATORS OF PHYSICAL MODES, THE ESTILLIANS… WHICH IS MORE OR LESS WHAT THE TVS PHYSICAL MODES ARE INSPIRED BY. FALSETTO IS A PHYSICAL MODE, HEAD VOICE IS NOTHING MORE THEN A METAPHOR FOR THE UPPER REGISTER… HEAD VOICE ACTUALLY DOESN’T MEAN ANYTHING, IF YOU WANT TO BE STRICT ABOUT IT. IT IS A “PICTURE WORD” TO REFER TO THE UPPER VOICE SENSATION WE ALL HAVE… TO CALL IT A VOCAL MODE, IS TO CLAIM THAT IT IS A PHYSICAL AND TANGIBLE THING, WHICH IT ISN’T. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS ‘REINFORCED FALSETTO’. THERE IS ONLY A PHYSICAL MODE CALLED FALSETTO AND IT IS CHARACTERIZED BY A WINDY, OPEN GLOTTIS THAT ESCAPES RESPIRATION. IF THE PHONATION DOES NOT HAVE WIND, IT IS NOT FALSETTO. IF YOU “REINFORCE” A PHONATION ON A HIGH NOTE ABOVE THE BRIDGE, IT IS MORE ACCURATELY GOING TO BE VOCAL TWANG… WHICH IS ANOTHER PHYSICAL MODE. In TVS falsetto is a mode, but the head voice is just what you call notes that resonate from the head, in whatever mode you are singing. WELL DONE, THAT IS MORE OR LESS CORRECT. HOWEVER, NOTE THAT THIS DEFINITION OF MODES IS NOT JUST THE WAY TVS SEES IT. IT IS ALSO THE WAY ESTILLIANS AND CVI SEES IT. ESTILL ARE THE ORIGINATORS OF VOCAL MODES, SO PEOPLE THAT CARE TO BE ACCURATE ABOUT VOCAL MODES, TEND TO FOLLOW THEIR ORIGINAL FOUNDATION ON THE TOPIC, WHICH TVS PHYSICAL MODES DO. I prefer the TVS definition. However, I think that makes the whole bridging late vs bridging early debate between the two systems inconsistent. IS THERE A DEBATE? ... OH YA, KTVA WOULD LIKE CONSUMERS TO BELIEVE THERE IS… THERE IS NO DEBATE. TVS HAS BOTH BOTTOM UP AND TOP DOWN TECHNIQUES. THIS IS A TIRED, OLD IDEA THAT STARTED ABOUT FOUR YEARS AGO THAT HAS BEEN PROPAGATED TO CREATE CONFUSION IN THE MARKET ABOUT WHAT TVS STANDS FOR... KTVA HAS GOT A LOT OF MILEAGE OUT OF PROPAGATING THIS MISINFORMATION. IT IS COMPLETELY STUPID AND I HAVE CREATED NO LESS THEN FOUR VIDEOS TO COMBAT THE CONFUSION. Ken's criticism of what he calls late bridging seems more apt to describing some classical voice teachers who teach bridging to a falsetto mode instead of a twang mode, or metal screamers who rely on a distorted reinforced falsetto. His criticism being that early bridging over time breaks down the "mid voice," of which he doesn't define. HE TALKS A GOOD GAME AND CERTAINLY SINGS A GOOD GAME… BUT WITH ALL DUE RESPECT, IN MY OPINION AND FROM FEEDBACK FROM HIS CUSTOMERS, HE DOESN’T ALWAYS DEFINE OR EXPLAIN A GOOD GAME. IN REGARDS TO EARLY BRIDGING AND VOCAL ATROPHY… ON THIS POINT, I AGREE WITH KEN. THE LACK OF BOTTOM UP TRAINING WILL RESULT IN WEAK TA MUSCLE STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE. BOTTOM TRAINING IS ESSENTIAL TO BELTING, BUT ALSO JUST TO BASIC VOCAL HEALTH. THIS IS WHY THE NEW 4PILLARS SYSTEM HAS AN EXTENSIVE BOTTOM-UP AND BELT TRAINING EXPLANATIONS AND ROUTINES. With the TVS definition, I'd say I mostly bridge early. But it's not such a big difference it seems. I can still bring a bigger boomier sound up higher, but from learning early bridging techniques, I'm not stuck to an overly heavy phonation with constriction. It's dynamic and free. PRECISELY!!!!!!!!!!! YOU NEED BOTH APPROACHES! DIFFERENT PEOPLE NEED DIFFERENT APPROACHES BASED ON THEIR NEEDS. YOU DESCRIBED THOSE NEEDS NICELY. I TOTALLY AGREE. KNOW THIS… THE REASON ANY COACH WOULD BE LIGHT ON TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES IS SIMPLY BECAUSE TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES ARE MORE COMPLICATED TO UNDERSTAND AND TEACH. IT IS A LOT EASIER TO TEACH BOTTOM-UP TECHNIQUES. TOP-DOWN TECHNIQUES REQUIRE MORE PRECISION AND MORE UNDERSTANDING OF THE MUSCULATURE AND OTHER DETAILS. "PUSH FROM THE BOTTOM UP ON AN AH VOWEL"... IS A FAR EASIER STORY TO TELL, THEN BUILDING FROM INSIDE THE HEAD VOICE. I think part of the confusion also stems from the SLS / singing success terms, where the mixed voice is their term for twang, and head voice is defined as a strong falsetto. WHICH IS AN AWFUL DEFINITION OF TWANG… AND PAINFULLY INCORRECT. AGAIN, IF ANY OF THESE PEOPLE, WOULD BOTHER TO STUDY VOCAL MODES AS I HAVE, THEY WOULD NOT BE TALKING INACCURACIES TO CONSUMERS. SLS AND SS SEEM LIKE THE LEAST INFORMED TEACHERS SOMETIMES. TO BE SURE, THEY ARE NOT TRAINED IN VOCAL MODES AND ARE WAY OF COURSE WHEN IT COMES TO BELTING. VERY FEW PEOPLE WILL EVER BUILD A STRONG TOP REGISTER BELT WITH "SING LIKE YOU SPEAK" TYPE METHODS. It's kind of silly considering the actually mixed resonance we feel is only from around c4 to E4. Mixed voice is just a bad term. YEP… THAT IS WHY I KILLED IT IN MY “MIXED VOICE IS DEAD!” VIDEO… IT IS A TERM THAT SOME TEACHERS USE TO KEEP THEIR STUDENTS CONFUSED. THE MORE YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STUDENTS CONFUSED, THE LESS YOU HAVE TO REALLY UNDERSTAND YOUR SUBJECT MATTER AND BE ABLE TO REALLY EXPLAIN THINGS AS A TEACHER. Am I understanding this right? TOM, I THINK YOU HAVE A LOT OF THIS PRETTY SQUARED AWAY. IT SEEMS THE TVS CONTENT IS HELPING YOU TO SORT THIS ALL OUT, WHICH IS GREAT. Tom View full articles
  14. falsetto

    Hello, I recently got cast in the role of Katisha in the Mikado. The fun part? I'm a baritone. I found out when auditions were happening that I could hit the F5 required for the part in falsetto, so I tried out and was cast in the role. However, as rehearsals have gone on, my falsetto has gotten weaker and weaker, and in fact my range in chest voice has suffered as well. I think I might be straining my voice too much, though when I'm fully warmed up and singing it feels fine. Today, I can't sing any falsetto at all. I don't know if I just need to rest my voice for a while, or if I need to drop the part. I'm not experiencing any pain, but I'm really worried that I might be damaging my voice, because I definitely have much less stamina in falsetto.
  15. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>>
  16. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>> View full articles
  17. Introduction In the male voice lower and mid ranges, (what has been traditionally called the "chest voice"), the harmonic structure of the sung tone contains many partials - harmonics, which fit nicely into the pattern of resonances for any particular vowel chosen. Throughout this range, the strong, lower harmonics are reinforced by the first vowel resonance corresponding with Formant 1, (F1), midrange harmonics are reinforced by the second vowel resonance from Formant 2 (F2), and higher harmonics are emphasized by the higher "twang" or "singer's" formant resonances. The combination of multiple, powerful low, midrange, and high harmonics present in all vowels is a distinctive characteristic of this section of the male voice. In contrast with this, in the male high range, (what has been traditionally called the 'head voice'), the harmonics produced by the voice are higher in frequency and more widely spaced. Here, few of the harmonics fit into the vowel resonance pattern. For one particular span of notes in the head voice, there is no significant resonance available to amplify the lowest two harmonics produced. To achieve vocal power and consistency of tone in the high voice, the male singer uses what he has available, "twang" (singer's formant) and the resonance from F2 strengthening harmonic 3 or 4, depending on vowel. Between these two resonance strategies is a region of transition, too high for the 'chest voice' strategy, and too low for the F2 alignments of the 'head voice' strategy. This transition region is the passaggio. Acoustics of the rising fundamental Throughout the voice, as the fundamental frequency moves, the alignment of harmonics and resonances for a vowel changes. On an upward-moving scale or leap, the fundamental and all the overtones rise in frequency. Since the harmonics are spaced at multiples of the fundamental, the harmonics also get farther apart, too. For most of the chest voice range, this is not an issue, as the resonance from F1 covers a wide frequency range, and midrange harmonics are close enough together for at least 2 or 3 of them to get some benefit from F2. These conditions apply to all the vowels. However, in an upward pitch pattern, as the voice passes middle C (C-F, depending on voice type) eventually the scale reaches a region in the voice where the alignment of harmonics to formants is no longer advantageous. Overall vocal power and tone quality will be lost if an adjustment is not made. The particular point in the male voice where this occurs is as the 2nd harmonic passes F1. Visualizing harmonics and the /e/ vowel in a spectragraph As illustration of this, what follows is a series of spectragraphs made with different fundamentals sung to the vowel /e/ (ay), made using my own, baritone, voice. As representative of a lower chest voice tone, the first is of the A natural just a bit more than an octave below middle C , also known as A2. Each vertical blue line represents the intensity of a particular harmonic, where 'up' = louder. Low frequency harmonics start on the left side. The leftmost peak is from the fundamental, and if you look at each peak to the right of that (increasing frequency of harmonic), you can see that the 4th harmonic is the very tallest, and then the peaks become successively shorter. This peak volume for the 4th harmonic, and the emphasis of those surrounding it, is the result of Formant 1, F1 in its position for /e/ in my voice. Harmonics to the 'left' of the formant center get progressively louder as they get nearer to it, and those to the 'right' of the formant center get softer. Proceeding to the right is a section of quite harmonics, not so tall in the display, and then there is another build up to the 13th harmonic. This is the area amplified as a result of the location of Formant 2, F2. The spacing of F1 and F2 is what makes this vowel sound like 'ay' to the listener. After another gap, there are two more areas of emphasis, which are the result of F3 and F4, clustered together. These formants move very little vowel-to-vowel, and form the high frequency 'brightness' resonances of the singer's formant. The reason we start with this: for any given vowel pronunciation, (like /e/) the formants stay at the same locations even while the fundamental (and the associated harmonics) are moved during the production of different notes. Especially important in the understanding of the male passaggio is the relationship of F1, F2 and how the harmonics align with them. A2 on /e/ vowel. Harmonic spacing As mentioned earlier, for any given sung note, harmonics are always the same frequency distance apart. That frequency spacing is the same frequency as the fundamental... the note being sung. So, if a fundamental is 110 cycles per second (like that A2,) all the harmonics will be 110 cycles apart from their neighboring harmonics. You can see this equal spacing in the picture above. Because of the closeness of the harmonic spacing, you are able to see pretty well the 'shape' of the formant regions. Up an Octave The next picture is of the same /e/ vowel, but singing the A up one octave, the A just below middle C, A3, which is 220 cycles per second. Notice that the peaks are farther from each other than in the prior picture... now they are 220 cycles per second apart. Looking at the peaks for a moment, you can see that the amplification effects of F1 and F2 are still in the same place (left to right), but now different numbered harmonics are boosted, and fewer harmonics are affected by each individual formant. In the case of F1, the 3rd harmonic is now the most emphasized, with the 2nd harmonic also getting some help, while F2 is emphasizing the 7th harmonic tremendously, but not much else. This excellent alignment of F2 with a harmonic makes it really ring distinctively, and is an example of 2nd-formant tuning, which will get discussed later. Finding the exact location of F1 for /e/ Are you curious about the exact location of F1? Look at the bottom of this next picture, right beween harmonics 2 and 3. See the blips? All voices have some soft, non-harmonic noise. When that noise falls under a formant, it gets amplified enough to measure. These low blips on the spectragraph are the giveaway to the location of the formant. A3 on /e/ vowel Continuing the scale upward As I continue up the scale from A3, three things happen due to the musical intervals represented by the harmonics: 1) My 2nd harmonic gets closer and closer to F1, strengthing that harmonic. This makes the warmth of the voice 'bloom' in this region, and the resonance makes it possible to oversing some and still get away with it. 2) My 3rd harmonic gets higher above F1, and so it gets progressively softer. In combination with #1, this changes the tone quality somewhat. 3) F2 tunes to successively lower harmonics. These three trends are very important in understanding the male passaggio. More on 'What happens when a harmonic rises above a formant'? As a particular harmonic rises above a formant center, it rapidly decreases in intensity. In this next picture, now singing Bb3 (up just one half step from the A), you can see the effect on the 3rd harmonic. It is quite softer now when compared to the 2nd harmonic. For this note, the principal power of the vowel is being carried by the 2nd harmonic. You may also note that the F2 tuning is emphasizing harmonics 6 and 7 more or less equally. That is because F2 is between them. Harmonic 7 is no longer in the 'ringing' position, and harmonic 6 is not yet high enough to be there. Bb3 /e/ vowel The male upper chest voice My voice is now in the 'fattest' part of the upper chest voice, where most of the vowel power is coming from the 2nd harmonic. This range is just about a perfect 5th wide, because that is the spacing of the 2nd and 3rd harmonics. The region begins as the 3rd harmonic passes F1, and ends as the 2nd harmonic passes F1, in other words, for my /e/ vowel, from the Ab below middle C, to the Eb above middle C. This is what makes my voice a 'low baritone' quality. (Note, you can still see the noise blip.. its getting closer to the 2nd harmonic the higher I sing) Now, the Db in the following picture. Notice that there are little noise blips on each side of the 2nd harmonic. This indicates optimum alignment of the harmonic with F1, the place where the 2nd harmonic is exactly aligned with F1. Db4 /e/ vowel The effects of strong resonance on ease-of-singing Through the entire compass of my voice, up to this point, lower harmonics have been boosted by F1, which has provided for some cushioning effect for the vocal bands. That situation is about to change significantly as the fundamental rises past this point. A very important challenge to the singer as this happens is to resist the temptation to maintain vocal power via pushing. And now to the Eb. The 2nd harmonic has just past F1. Its still very strong, but will lose ground very rapidly as I proceed upward. This is the beginning of the tricky section of the passaggio, where the resonance provided to the 2nd harmonic decreases rapidly, and I must, to retain vocal power and tone quality, find another way to shape the vowel. Eb4 /e/ vowel My next post, 'Male voice passaggio 102' will discuss the various strategies that can be used to retain resonance through the passaggio.
  18. Introduction In the male voice lower and mid ranges, (what has been traditionally called the "chest voice"), the harmonic structure of the sung tone contains many partials - harmonics, which fit nicely into the pattern of resonances for any particular vowel chosen. Throughout this range, the strong, lower harmonics are reinforced by the first vowel resonance corresponding with Formant 1, (F1), midrange harmonics are reinforced by the second vowel resonance from Formant 2 (F2), and higher harmonics are emphasized by the higher "twang" or "singer's" formant resonances. The combination of multiple, powerful low, midrange, and high harmonics present in all vowels is a distinctive characteristic of this section of the male voice. In contrast with this, in the male high range, (what has been traditionally called the 'head voice'), the harmonics produced by the voice are higher in frequency and more widely spaced. Here, few of the harmonics fit into the vowel resonance pattern. For one particular span of notes in the head voice, there is no significant resonance available to amplify the lowest two harmonics produced. To achieve vocal power and consistency of tone in the high voice, the male singer uses what he has available, "twang" (singer's formant) and the resonance from F2 strengthening harmonic 3 or 4, depending on vowel. Between these two resonance strategies is a region of transition, too high for the 'chest voice' strategy, and too low for the F2 alignments of the 'head voice' strategy. This transition region is the passaggio. Acoustics of the rising fundamental Throughout the voice, as the fundamental frequency moves, the alignment of harmonics and resonances for a vowel changes. On an upward-moving scale or leap, the fundamental and all the overtones rise in frequency. Since the harmonics are spaced at multiples of the fundamental, the harmonics also get farther apart, too. For most of the chest voice range, this is not an issue, as the resonance from F1 covers a wide frequency range, and midrange harmonics are close enough together for at least 2 or 3 of them to get some benefit from F2. These conditions apply to all the vowels. However, in an upward pitch pattern, as the voice passes middle C (C-F, depending on voice type) eventually the scale reaches a region in the voice where the alignment of harmonics to formants is no longer advantageous. Overall vocal power and tone quality will be lost if an adjustment is not made. The particular point in the male voice where this occurs is as the 2nd harmonic passes F1. Visualizing harmonics and the /e/ vowel in a spectragraph As illustration of this, what follows is a series of spectragraphs made with different fundamentals sung to the vowel /e/ (ay), made using my own, baritone, voice. As representative of a lower chest voice tone, the first is of the A natural just a bit more than an octave below middle C , also known as A2. Each vertical blue line represents the intensity of a particular harmonic, where 'up' = louder. Low frequency harmonics start on the left side. The leftmost peak is from the fundamental, and if you look at each peak to the right of that (increasing frequency of harmonic), you can see that the 4th harmonic is the very tallest, and then the peaks become successively shorter. This peak volume for the 4th harmonic, and the emphasis of those surrounding it, is the result of Formant 1, F1 in its position for /e/ in my voice. Harmonics to the 'left' of the formant center get progressively louder as they get nearer to it, and those to the 'right' of the formant center get softer. Proceeding to the right is a section of quite harmonics, not so tall in the display, and then there is another build up to the 13th harmonic. This is the area amplified as a result of the location of Formant 2, F2. The spacing of F1 and F2 is what makes this vowel sound like 'ay' to the listener. After another gap, there are two more areas of emphasis, which are the result of F3 and F4, clustered together. These formants move very little vowel-to-vowel, and form the high frequency 'brightness' resonances of the singer's formant. The reason we start with this: for any given vowel pronunciation, (like /e/) the formants stay at the same locations even while the fundamental (and the associated harmonics) are moved during the production of different notes. Especially important in the understanding of the male passaggio is the relationship of F1, F2 and how the harmonics align with them. A2 on /e/ vowel. Harmonic spacing As mentioned earlier, for any given sung note, harmonics are always the same frequency distance apart. That frequency spacing is the same frequency as the fundamental... the note being sung. So, if a fundamental is 110 cycles per second (like that A2,) all the harmonics will be 110 cycles apart from their neighboring harmonics. You can see this equal spacing in the picture above. Because of the closeness of the harmonic spacing, you are able to see pretty well the 'shape' of the formant regions. Up an Octave The next picture is of the same /e/ vowel, but singing the A up one octave, the A just below middle C, A3, which is 220 cycles per second. Notice that the peaks are farther from each other than in the prior picture... now they are 220 cycles per second apart. Looking at the peaks for a moment, you can see that the amplification effects of F1 and F2 are still in the same place (left to right), but now different numbered harmonics are boosted, and fewer harmonics are affected by each individual formant. In the case of F1, the 3rd harmonic is now the most emphasized, with the 2nd harmonic also getting some help, while F2 is emphasizing the 7th harmonic tremendously, but not much else. This excellent alignment of F2 with a harmonic makes it really ring distinctively, and is an example of 2nd-formant tuning, which will get discussed later. Finding the exact location of F1 for /e/ Are you curious about the exact location of F1? Look at the bottom of this next picture, right beween harmonics 2 and 3. See the blips? All voices have some soft, non-harmonic noise. When that noise falls under a formant, it gets amplified enough to measure. These low blips on the spectragraph are the giveaway to the location of the formant. A3 on /e/ vowel Continuing the scale upward As I continue up the scale from A3, three things happen due to the musical intervals represented by the harmonics: 1) My 2nd harmonic gets closer and closer to F1, strengthing that harmonic. This makes the warmth of the voice 'bloom' in this region, and the resonance makes it possible to oversing some and still get away with it. 2) My 3rd harmonic gets higher above F1, and so it gets progressively softer. In combination with #1, this changes the tone quality somewhat. 3) F2 tunes to successively lower harmonics. These three trends are very important in understanding the male passaggio. More on 'What happens when a harmonic rises above a formant'? As a particular harmonic rises above a formant center, it rapidly decreases in intensity. In this next picture, now singing Bb3 (up just one half step from the A), you can see the effect on the 3rd harmonic. It is quite softer now when compared to the 2nd harmonic. For this note, the principal power of the vowel is being carried by the 2nd harmonic. You may also note that the F2 tuning is emphasizing harmonics 6 and 7 more or less equally. That is because F2 is between them. Harmonic 7 is no longer in the 'ringing' position, and harmonic 6 is not yet high enough to be there. Bb3 /e/ vowel The male upper chest voice My voice is now in the 'fattest' part of the upper chest voice, where most of the vowel power is coming from the 2nd harmonic. This range is just about a perfect 5th wide, because that is the spacing of the 2nd and 3rd harmonics. The region begins as the 3rd harmonic passes F1, and ends as the 2nd harmonic passes F1, in other words, for my /e/ vowel, from the Ab below middle C, to the Eb above middle C. This is what makes my voice a 'low baritone' quality. (Note, you can still see the noise blip.. its getting closer to the 2nd harmonic the higher I sing) Now, the Db in the following picture. Notice that there are little noise blips on each side of the 2nd harmonic. This indicates optimum alignment of the harmonic with F1, the place where the 2nd harmonic is exactly aligned with F1. Db4 /e/ vowel The effects of strong resonance on ease-of-singing Through the entire compass of my voice, up to this point, lower harmonics have been boosted by F1, which has provided for some cushioning effect for the vocal bands. That situation is about to change significantly as the fundamental rises past this point. A very important challenge to the singer as this happens is to resist the temptation to maintain vocal power via pushing. And now to the Eb. The 2nd harmonic has just past F1. Its still very strong, but will lose ground very rapidly as I proceed upward. This is the beginning of the tricky section of the passaggio, where the resonance provided to the 2nd harmonic decreases rapidly, and I must, to retain vocal power and tone quality, find another way to shape the vowel. Eb4 /e/ vowel My next post, 'Male voice passaggio 102' will discuss the various strategies that can be used to retain resonance through the passaggio. View full articles
  19. If you can, you will be able to use your voice, by design, and think on a parallel track and in synchronicity with your speaking or singing. Nevertheless, this is an invaluable skill to have. The fact is that the majority of people do not possess that skill, as they are simply out-of-balance and out of alignment. Some of them think long and hard before producing the speaking or singing sounds and thus, evidently, “missing the boat”. The others, opposite; they speak and sing without boarders and think, if at all, after the fact. It is especially crucial for those who have been undergoing a non-surgical voice repair ordeal. In fact, the above-described imbalance was also a contributing factor to their voice disorder in the first place. The human being who is, in fact, in balance, is most likely able to think and act on a parallel track, which means that his/her subconscious mind and conscious mind are aligned and thus, work on a parallel track with each other. The subconscious mind is responsible for the thinking and the conscious mind plays the role of the driving force. If they are in agreement with each other, the voice should come out as the outcome of the above equation. If the synchronicity between the subconscious and conscious mind is disrupted, the person will not be able to produce any sound upon design and will get stagnated with their thinking and no action, or with the action, which is not supported by any structural thinking. In this case, the singer most likely will be going out of tune and out of timing and, no doubts, sooner or later, will end up with some kind of voice disorder. The regular speaking person, who is very loud in an everyday basis, screaming and shouting at all given times and without boarders, also will end up with some kind of voice damage down the road. As these people have no understanding of any kind that their voice is also one of their organs and if abused, it will lose its functionality, just like a liver will give up its functions for the alcoholics. To conclude – The balance is everything, and so is the knowledge. Stop yelling and screaming before, during and after the voice repair work. Speak in moderation and be always on guard that the voice is a fragile human organ and could snap and become damaged at any given time. For singers - don’t push your voice to the extreme high or low notes without knowledge how to approach and access it. Please learn how to hear yourself thinking and act accordingly and timely.
  20. Hey guys, Figured I'd start with my own thread like Anthony to show what I've been up to regarding training. Here are some sound samples from today: simple onsets and a couple of songs. One is Bleeding Heart and the other is Carry On, both by Angra. I recorded everything with my phone and nothing was a formal sit-down practice... I was just doing this throughout the day and in the car (limited practice time). In the Carry On sample, I definitely need more fold closure... not enough edging / front placed vowels. There is a lot of falsetto there. The Bleeding Heart sample is mostly chest voice, very relaxed and light, with a couple of belts here and there. Any input / feedback would be welcome! Rock on!
  21. Hi Friends , This is my first post on themodernvocalistworld forum, I am very excited to view and share the experience with the voice professional. I am a high school student and part time singer, although I am still considering myself as a beginner in the singing world but I have sung since last 5 year. Now I want a standpoint in the music world. I usually go for singing auditions & short time performance on a live show for getting the fame. But sometimes I am feeling bad due to hesitance, on the auditions I lost my rhythm completely. I am taking green tea and some other herbs to make voice perfect. My friend suggests me 'Throat Saver Spray', really I don't know much about it. I found SuperiorVocalHealth selling this herb product. Did anybody used it before, please share experience with me . Thanks in Advance
  22. Lately, we are hearing more and more about people’s vocal tragediesSome of them have been suffering for years with the loss of their regular voice, speaking and/or singing. Majority of them went to all kinds of doctors and specialists and have been diagnosed with all kinds of health problems related or, most of the times, not related to their vocal performance. The loss of their original speaking and/or singing voice had been blamed on all kinds of the person’s internal health. Yes, granted some of the internal health problems may be related to the quality of the voice. For example: If the person practicing an unhealthy diet i.e. consumes a lot of dairy products, that person most likely will possess a lot of mucus everywhere in the body, vocal anatomy included. If the person eats a lot of acidic products like tomatoes, oranges, red meats and others, no doubts this person will suffer from acid reflux. That said, if they do have a problem with their range and projection of their voice, naturally, their voice is drawn to the lower position, thus it is prone to meet the gastric acid which, in turn, will begin to burn the vocal cords. That said, the inner health and outer fitness would definitely help with whichever vocal problems and/or issues the person may experience. The cleaner and more fit the physical body is, the stronger and more vibrant the persons’ mind will be also. The Vocal Science ™ method requires the lift of the voice to the set of the facial muscles/cavities to release the pressure of the sound from the vocal box and vocal cords, per say. If you visualize a ballerina trying to jump taking off of a thick carpet, you can imagine that not only she, most likely, will injure her ankle or knee, but also would never acquire a needed height to accomplish the pas de deux. That said, if the vocal cords are covered with mucus and the bottom of the throat is full of gastric acid, to lift the sound off of “that ground” could become quite difficult. For that, I am using natural herbs and remedies to clean up the surface of the vocal box to be able to achieve the lift of the voice with the support by the abdominal muscles. So the flora of the throat becomes clean and begins its healing. The doctors usually “bombard” their clients with a whole bunch of scary sounding definitions and diagnosis. The clients usually tell me that they have no idea how to read, let alone understand their medical transcriptions/reports. It is usually extremely over-exaggerated and, for the longest time, I could not understand why. One of my new clients reports suggesting that he has had preoperative and postoperative care. In reality, the person never had undergone any vocal surgery whatsoever. In the not so very distant past, I had a person who worked as a medical assistant and she advised me that every move the doctor makes has a special code. For example: If the doctor checks your blood pressure, he charges the insurance, (here in Canada), $200.00. I am, sure the ENT specialists are charging for all of their checkups, scopes, and etc.. So my assumption is that the more the doctor writes, the more he is able to charge either the insurance or the person individually. This is just my general subjective opinion. Take it for what it is. Sometimes, in fact, “they are right on the money” and they produce the right diagnosis, but they still do not offer, or even suggest, any meaningful help to the sufferer. In majority of cases, the problem is mechanical, but very often coupled with the physical and emotional state of the individual. So my duty is to dissect the problem into pieces and work on each piece individually and collectively. That’s what I call forensic analysis and expertise, and yes, it is very applicable to any voice issues.
  23. I had resolved that I would not post gratuitous high-pitched screams on here until I had some more practical and sensible performance to seek advice and comment on. However I can't help myself. I was going through the Foundation Building Routine and whereas I normally* run out of steam at C5, I was able to maintain some control and closure up to D#5. My control is really lacking on the way back down the octave compared to on the way up. There is plenty to critique in this (and I'm certainly interested to hear anything anyone has to say) but my main purpose is to share this bit of progress in controlling my wayward vocal tract. * By 'normally' I mean after having worked with Pillars for some time. Before Pillars B4, maybe even A4, was out of reach except as pure falsetto. Greg
  24. Robert Lunte tracking "Nocturne" at Synergy Productions during pre-production of a new EP. This music has not been mastered yet and there will be one final production to near future, but I decided to just turn on my iPhone yesterday. Here you go... "Behind The Scenes" video ... hope some of you find this interesting and entertaining. Take voice training for the purpose of finding YOUR voice, your unique sound colors and your strengths as a singer, not to "sing like" someone else. "Nocturne" was written and produced by Robert Lunte & Engineered by Jason Shavey.
  25. YOUR INSTRUMENT - UNDERSTANDING THE WHOLE VOICE: A 4-PART SERIES Co-authored by Dena Murray & Hilary Canto The series is presented as downloadable pdf files below so that you can easily print them. We'd love you to have a discussion thread here in the comments section. Please add any questions/comments below. We hope you enjoy the series! Thank you Dena & Hilary Left-Click here to download Part 1 Left-Click here to download Part 2 Left-Click here to download Part 3 Left-Click here to download Part 4 Dena Murray teaches in- home and online beginners as well as professionals with her own style technique for correct placement of the voice as well the art of breathing. Books available are: Vocal Technique: Finding your Real Voice (Hal Leonard Corp. 2002), a beginner's book separating the voice before teaching how to bridge the passaggio. Advanced Vocal Technique: Middle Voice, Placement & Styles co-authored with Tita Hutchison (Hal Leonard Publishing 2007) focuses strictly on placement and a unique technical approach to bridging the passaggio. Vocal Strength and Power: Boost Your Singing with Proper Technique and Breathing to be published By Hal Leonard Publishing, end 2009. You can find her on the TMV Directory Of Experts. www.denamurray.com Hilary Canto teaches in-home and online and developed the TRUE VOICE COURSE specially for allowing the voice to flow freely from the heart and to teach healthy vocal technique for performance singing. The course is available as mp3 files with written sheets to download. You can purchase it through and see her training videos to accompany the course on her TMV, youtube and myspace pages. You can find her on the TMV Directory of Experts.