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Found 23 results

  1. Hi everyone, new member here. I am a female singer who has been diagnosed with a severe underbite and TMJ with neck stiffness. This diagnosis has been pretty devastating to my confidence, given that I am not a trained singer and have only been doing this for about 3 years (I'm 20). I have recorded quite a bit of music, mostly originals in the style of punk rock, and I can't help but think that my severe underbite coupled with the loud style of singing that I have grown accustomed to is to blame for my TMJ. At the moment, I am seeking treatment to correct my bite via jaw surgery, but it will not be completely fixed for another year to 2 years. Until then, I need some tips on how to overcome this problem so that I can start gigging live and avoid the pain/burning sensation that I get when I sing. Has anyone had a similar experience?
  2. We're working with one of the best independent UK Dance labels and currently looking for a vocalist for an exciting new release. We need a singer with a vocal tone very similar to Marvin Gaye to record a topline on a dance track. You must either be able to travel to London to record or have access to recording equipment to record the vocals.Once accepted through to the workspace we'll request you to record a short vocal demo which we will submit to our client for them to make the final decision. If you are then chosen for this project, we'll provide you with the full brief for you to be able to record the topline. The budget is £250/£300 for recording the vocal topline. See http://www.themodernvocalistworld.com/forum/15-seeking-vocalist-vocalist-available/
  3. For the pipe organ an open valve will trigger the sound of the pipe. The key of a song tells us which valves we can open safely to stay in harmony. Singers have a comfort zone All singers have a comfort zone, a range of notes that sound best and can be performed effortless. Despite of the ability to expand the vocal range through training, every singer has an individual physical quality which is responsible for the position of the comfort zone within the vocal spectrum. We may not consciously observe this, but the habit of speaking is already giving us a clue about this range. In classic musical education we classify this range by defining voice types, though this method is mostly a helpful convergence to reality. For the singer it is therefore essential to spend some effort on song choice, especially to ensure that a song lies within his or her vocal abilities. Of course that is not the only consideration during song choice, and if you are interested we invite you to read our article "Improve Your Song Choice" to find out more. Another possibility is to simply change the range of notes to be performed by changing the key of the song. The original key Every song was written in an original key. The key we know for any of these songs could be the one it was written in, or it could be the key used when the recording we know was produced. We still refer to it as original key. Original keys are usually relatively easy to access. They may be documented in sheet music, or available in databases, per example for DJ's that research harmonic mixing, among other sources. It also can be determined by examining the chords and notes of the song. It is to mention that a key can and oftentimes does change within a song. The key a song is regarded to be in is most often starting in the key and at one point returning to the same key before the end. Find out what exactly a key is, and how keys are transitioned in our article "Musical Keys and the Key Change". Here is an example. A song written or performed in a G Major key is based on the tonic note of G, and includes a system of notes defined by the major scale that is also based on the tonic note. The chord progressions used in the song will to a great extent lie within the scale, with the tonic chord being the foundation of those progressions. What happens between the use of G Major may be harmonic movement and/or modulation. Lead Vocals and original keys Here at Lead Vocals we consider our practice section as a tool to quickly review and learn the melody, timing, phrasing, and mood of a performance. In addition we think that the tool enables vocalists to study other artists by paying close attention to ingredients like dialect and pronunciation in language, the choice of placing words or phrases within rhythm and beats, any habits, and style and musical influences. Unlike other existing tools like per example some karaoke platforms we do not offer access to the same performance in multiple keys. But just recently we have introduced additional helpful information about many of the songs available here within the tagging system. At present we offer selection by tonic pitch, musical key, and scale information which can be helpful to explore new music. We think that from an educational point of view the choice of the tonic pitch is most interesting, because many melodies in songs may start or end with the tonic note. If a vocalist can deliver that note in a rich, strong, and compelling tonal quality that makes the audience want to hear more, then the song choice by tonic pitch may lead to the discovery of suitable songs for the singer. You may give this a try by selecting a song to practice by tonic pitch. Continue solving the mystery Find out why vocalists change the key of a song and how they approach the key change. In an attempt to solve the mystery behind the musical key we define what a key is, and explain the background of harmonic movement, chord progressions, and modulation. We also include the consideration of emotional characteristics for all keys based on the major and minor scale, that may play an additional role in the selection process for the vocalist. Further we're taking a brief look at common practice in recording sessions. Continue reading about this topic in our article "Musical Keys and the Key Change" at http://www.leadvocals.ca/background/musical-keys-and-the-key-change Additional Information Our Practice Section at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/practice Try to Sing Along at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/lyrics/songs What is Lead Vocals? Lead Vocals is a free of charge online resource for aspiring vocalists, who are learning the craft of singing and who practice their art by singing along to playback recordings and to other selected musical performances on video. All recordings are hand selected and the lyrics are spot on matching to the performance of the lead vocalist. The tool allows for quick access to practice specific parts within a song. We especially took care in avoiding clutter and disruptive advertising. Follow us on Social Media https://facebook.com/leadvocals.ca https://plus.google.com/+LeadvocalsCa https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadvocals https://www.twitter.com/leadvocalsca https://www.youtube.com/LeadvocalsCa
  4. An example for the use of music is its distribution to people through a sound system. If a singer, instrumentalist or a band wants to record, use, or perform music that is owned or controlled by somebody else, it is very likely that a license has to be obtained to do this on legal ground. Find out what kind of licenses control the use and recreation of music compositions, audio recordings, the use of music in public, the reproduction of sheet music, and the performance of theatrical productions. At Lead Vocals we also offer links and services to help you obtaining licenses for cover songs. The purpose of licensing The purpose of music licensing is to make sure that the people and companies involved in the creation process of music, like per example the composer, the record label, the performing artist, and the publisher will get paid for the work and effort they have put into a piece of music. Allowing somebody to use a piece of music either as a composition, or as a recording, can be understood like a trade between the creator and the licensee. Per example, if an artist is recording a cover song of another artist and is then distributing and selling that song on his or her own album release, he or she must ensure that the original composer of that song gets a share in form of a royalty. A royalty is a sum of money paid to the rights holder for each copy of a work sold, or for each public performance of a work. In common practice such royalties are most often calculated and collected in advance during the phase of producing the copies. Types of music licenses It is to mention that we in general distinguish between different kinds of uses for music, its recordings, and its production. Here is an overview with examples for the most common types of music licenses: In general a license is necessary when the task is done by someone, who did not create the work. The overview shows a common example, but is in no way a complete reference. If you are interested in reading deeper into the topic please continue reading our article at - http://www.leadvocals.ca/background/music-licensing Additional Information License a Cover Song http://www.leadvocals.ca/resources/license-a-cover-song Our Practice Section at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/practice Try to Sing Along at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/lyrics/songs What is Lead Vocals? Lead Vocals is a free of charge online resource for aspiring vocalists, who are learning the craft of singing and who practice their art by singing along to playback recordings and to other selected musical performances on video. All recordings are hand selected and the lyrics are spot on matching to the performance of the lead vocalist. The tool allows for quick access to practice specific parts within a song. We especially took care in avoiding clutter and disruptive advertising. Follow us on Social Media https://facebook.com/leadvocals.ca https://plus.google.com/+LeadvocalsCa https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadvocals https://www.twitter.com/leadvocalsca https://www.youtube.com/LeadvocalsCa
  5. Gorgeous Singing Here! Such a talent for dynamics and expression. Nice work Carmel who is a student at The Vocalist Studio performs the classic "Crazy" from Patsy Cline on the RODE K2.
  6. Gorgeous Singing Here! Such a talent for dynamics and expression. Nice work Carmel who is a student at The Vocalist Studio performs the classic "Crazy" from Patsy Cline on the RODE K2. View full articles
  7. Hello Robert and Hello to all! I just ordered the TVS program and am excited to start working on my singing. Quick bio. 48 Y.O. male from southside Virginia. I have played lead guitar since 1988. After taking many years away from home recording, I got back into it about 18 months ago and had to learn the new DAWs etc from scratch. To make a long story short, I have about 50 "songs" on my hard drive that need vox. I also have quite a few lyrics written without any music etc. It has been difficult (impossible) for me to find any singers to work with so the next logical step is to just develop my own singing voice more. Hopefully it is not too late. Besides which, I love to sing even if I am not very technically aware at this moment. As far as singing, I want to sing rock, classic rock, 80-90s rock, grunge, bluesy styles etc. In my songs I generally find myself in sort of the style of VH, Rainbow, Whitesnake, LedZep....sort of melodic and bluesy stuff. (at least thats the aim, hehe) My fave singers in no order. Ann Wilson, David Coverdale, Goran Edman, John Sykes, Glenn Hughes, Mark Slaughter, Marq Torien, Barry Gibb, Layne Staley and many others. I am not fixated on copying anyone though, I just want to develop my own innate abilities. My dream song might be "Love Kills" by Mark Slaughter when he was with Vinnie Vincent, but again, its not a fixation. (Im aware Mark had a pretty high voice lol) My current estimation of my singing abilities? I have potential to have a nice voice etc but am pretty clueless technically and totally untrained lol. Just from browsing vids etc I think I have a good understanding of some of the terminology....chest voice, head voice, falsetto, bridging etc. I understand the concept of vowel modification but have never tried to practice it myself. I am probably like a lot of other untrained people. If the song happens to "fit" my current capabilities, then I sound decent. But if it doesn't, I sound like a frog that spent the previous day hollering at a sports event. Sometimes I can sing along with the verse to a song but when it goes into the higher chorus part I cant hit that.....or I can hit it but I have to jump up to head voice with no bridging going on lol. I think my head voice is developed to some degree but there is a no mans land between my chest voice and head voice. If I work on a song I tend to get into a lot of pushing/straining/choking lol. No bridging currently happening. On occasion I also like to throw in some BeeGees falsetto. Anyway, I am excited to get to work and am looking forward to some nice progress. I am throwing in this link to a "before" song where I sang and played guitar over an existing rhythm track. This was in Jan 2014. Pretty sure all the vox are doubled. (manually sang twice) Im pretty good at doubling...since I have never thought my voice was good enough to stand on its own yet lol. Any feedback on the singing is welcome. Id be interested as to what my natural range is. I understand it isnt going to be that impressive as it is an untrained voice but maybe we can get an idea of what we are working with and what potential for range and style I might have etc Thanks a lot for any feedback! https://clyp.it/egudjvlp Peace, JonJon
  8. I want to record a high-quality song in the studio. I don't want it to sound pretty good or just nice. I want a professional radio-ready, tv ready sound. What do I need to do and how do I do it? Do I just buy recording time and they will do the rest or do I have to buy mixers and masters and all of the fancy people I don't know the names for? What are the steps and how do I start to make a pro recording of a song? I am not worried about how much the recording costs. I am only worried about the quality and the quality alone. Important information I have never done any work in a professional studio as far as I know, I do not know anyone personaly who has made a radio ready recording in a studio I do not have a drum set nor do I know how to play one if I did. Although I have had some experience with drum samples and thought they sounded pretty good at times Bass, Guitar, Vocals, and piano are all instruments That can be played professionally either by my self or others I know.
  9. In my quest for the perfect recording setup, I was pleased to discover an audio recording solution that minimizes the amount of gear I require to produce my YouTube content. I create educational videos on an almost daily basis and having a simple and effective audio recording setup is essential to my workflow. That's why I'm pleased to have discovered the RODE NT-USB microphone. The NT-USB is a Condenser Microphone which means that it's capable of recording the human voice with far clearer quality compared to something like a lavalier or headset mic which contain a Dynamic Microphone.) There's nothing worse than listening to poor quality voice narration, so I'm a big fan of using a condenser for all of my videos. This microphone can be purchased at The Vocal Gear Store. To connect a condenser microphone to a computer requires a USB or Firewire audio interface or a soundcard that can receive an XLR microphone cable. Typically, the interface will also need to support Phantom Power for a condenser microphone to work properly. In my previous recording setup, I was using an M-Audio Firewire Audio Interface connected to an AudioTechnica AT2020 Condenser Mic. While this setup certainly does the trick, it has a lot of cables and individual parts. This Summer, I found myself doing a lot of recording outside my studio. In an attempt to keep my gear to a minimum, I tried recording ambient audio with my camera microphones. To my disappointment, all I got was a lot of noise from wind and not much ambient audio. My goal for my outdoor videos is to paint a landscape, but also to capture nature sounds like birds and leaves rustling. It was apparent that if I wanted to get a good audio recording outdoors, I would need to start bringing a condenser mic with me on my recording sessions. On each trip, I would have to carry my drawing tablet, easel, tripods, cameras, supplies and sometimes a camping chair. I didn't want the burden of transporting, assembling and disassembling a Firewire interface, so I was relieved to discover the RODE NT-USB which doesn't require an audio interface. It simply plugs in and is powered through USB. As far as the specs, it's a studio-quality microphone which means that you can use it not only for voice narration and podcasts, but also for recording vocals and instruments. As with most condenser mics, the polar pattern is Cardioid. The NT-USB's frequency range is 20Hz ~ 20kHz so it going to do a marvelous job of capturing a natural sounding human voice with clarity. It's dynamic range is 96dB and its Max SPL is 110dB. As I mentioned before, it's powered by USB 5V DC and its weight is 520g, which is a little on the heavy side, but not uncommon for a condenser microphone. The NT-USB is very well built using high quality electronic components. Its metal case feels rugged, but as with all condenser mics, their internal parts are delicate, so I recommend taking caution with this type of mic. You certainly can't toss it around like you would a handheld Dynamic mic. The kind you typically see performers singing into. Aside from a computer and recording software like Garageband, the NT-USB comes with everything you need to setup and record. It even works with the iPad as long as you have the USB Camera Connection Kit. Included in the box are a tabletop tripod microphone stand, a 20” long USB cable and a Pop Shield. I appreciate the inclusion of these accessories because having a stand eliminates the need fo r a mic stand which takes up a lot of space. The long USB cable reaches pretty far as USB cables go. And the Pop Shield is especially useful for protecting your recordings from being ruined by plosives which are the loud pop sounds you get when you accidentally breathe too hard on the microphone. Condenser mics are particularly sensitive to plosives, so a Pop Shield is essential. I must admit, everything is so nice and compact once you get it assembled. It's super portable and it takes a lot of the hassle out o f setting up to record audio. Now let's talk about some of the pros and cons of the NT-USB. I don't have much that's negative to say about the NT-USB so I'll start there. While RODE states that the NT-USB is pre-set to an optimal recording gain, I have to disagree. Not all recording setups are the same and in my studio, there is some fan noise from my computer which means I need to set my gain lower to get a good recording. The NT-USB does not have a volume gain knob, so I have to set the recording gain by opening the recording properties on my computer and setting the levels there. While that does work, it's kind of a hassle compared to just turning a knob. Why this knob was left out, I don't know, but I sure do wish it were there. As far as the pros, there are several. First, there is a handy on-board headphone monitoring feature which allows you to adjust the balance between your voice and the background audio while recording. What this means is that while singing or narrating, you can make the background music louder or quieter to make it easier to hear your own voice in the mix. As I mentioned earlier, the NT-USB is USB powered, so it only requires a USB cable to connect to your computer and record audio. No preamp, audio input box, phantom power or XLR cable required. Less gear means less time setting up to record and I like that. So if you're a YouTuber, Vlogger, Podcaster or Vocal Artist who is in the market for a great all-in-one recording device that's ultra compact and portable, but doesn't compromise on voice quality, the RODE NT-USB is a great option for you. If you'd like to learn more about the RODE NT-USB please visit RODE's website at www.rodemic.com. - - - - - - - - - - - - - If you want to be part of the world's largest online community for singing where great professionalists will review your singing, don't miss the chance and use the 50% Discount Code for "Review my singing" Forum: TMVWorld50
  10. In my quest for the perfect recording setup, I was pleased to discover an audio recording solution that minimizes the amount of gear I require to produce my YouTube content. I create educational videos on an almost daily basis and having a simple and effective audio recording setup is essential to my workflow. That's why I'm pleased to have discovered the RODE NT-USB microphone. The NT-USB is a Condenser Microphone which means that it's capable of recording the human voice with far clearer quality compared to something like a lavalier or headset mic which contain a Dynamic Microphone.) There's nothing worse than listening to poor quality voice narration, so I'm a big fan of using a condenser for all of my videos. This microphone can be purchased at The Vocal Gear Store. To connect a condenser microphone to a computer requires a USB or Firewire audio interface or a soundcard that can receive an XLR microphone cable. Typically, the interface will also need to support Phantom Power for a condenser microphone to work properly. In my previous recording setup, I was using an M-Audio Firewire Audio Interface connected to an AudioTechnica AT2020 Condenser Mic. While this setup certainly does the trick, it has a lot of cables and individual parts. This Summer, I found myself doing a lot of recording outside my studio. In an attempt to keep my gear to a minimum, I tried recording ambient audio with my camera microphones. To my disappointment, all I got was a lot of noise from wind and not much ambient audio. My goal for my outdoor videos is to paint a landscape, but also to capture nature sounds like birds and leaves rustling. It was apparent that if I wanted to get a good audio recording outdoors, I would need to start bringing a condenser mic with me on my recording sessions. On each trip, I would have to carry my drawing tablet, easel, tripods, cameras, supplies and sometimes a camping chair. I didn't want the burden of transporting, assembling and disassembling a Firewire interface, so I was relieved to discover the RODE NT-USB which doesn't require an audio interface. It simply plugs in and is powered through USB. As far as the specs, it's a studio-quality microphone which means that you can use it not only for voice narration and podcasts, but also for recording vocals and instruments. As with most condenser mics, the polar pattern is Cardioid. The NT-USB's frequency range is 20Hz ~ 20kHz so it going to do a marvelous job of capturing a natural sounding human voice with clarity. It's dynamic range is 96dB and its Max SPL is 110dB. As I mentioned before, it's powered by USB 5V DC and its weight is 520g, which is a little on the heavy side, but not uncommon for a condenser microphone. The NT-USB is very well built using high quality electronic components. Its metal case feels rugged, but as with all condenser mics, their internal parts are delicate, so I recommend taking caution with this type of mic. You certainly can't toss it around like you would a handheld Dynamic mic. The kind you typically see performers singing into. Aside from a computer and recording software like Garageband, the NT-USB comes with everything you need to setup and record. It even works with the iPad as long as you have the USB Camera Connection Kit. Included in the box are a tabletop tripod microphone stand, a 20” long USB cable and a Pop Shield. I appreciate the inclusion of these accessories because having a stand eliminates the need fo r a mic stand which takes up a lot of space. The long USB cable reaches pretty far as USB cables go. And the Pop Shield is especially useful for protecting your recordings from being ruined by plosives which are the loud pop sounds you get when you accidentally breathe too hard on the microphone. Condenser mics are particularly sensitive to plosives, so a Pop Shield is essential. I must admit, everything is so nice and compact once you get it assembled. It's super portable and it takes a lot of the hassle out o f setting up to record audio. Now let's talk about some of the pros and cons of the NT-USB. I don't have much that's negative to say about the NT-USB so I'll start there. While RODE states that the NT-USB is pre-set to an optimal recording gain, I have to disagree. Not all recording setups are the same and in my studio, there is some fan noise from my computer which means I need to set my gain lower to get a good recording. The NT-USB does not have a volume gain knob, so I have to set the recording gain by opening the recording properties on my computer and setting the levels there. While that does work, it's kind of a hassle compared to just turning a knob. Why this knob was left out, I don't know, but I sure do wish it were there. As far as the pros, there are several. First, there is a handy on-board headphone monitoring feature which allows you to adjust the balance between your voice and the background audio while recording. What this means is that while singing or narrating, you can make the background music louder or quieter to make it easier to hear your own voice in the mix. As I mentioned earlier, the NT-USB is USB powered, so it only requires a USB cable to connect to your computer and record audio. No preamp, audio input box, phantom power or XLR cable required. Less gear means less time setting up to record and I like that. So if you're a YouTuber, Vlogger, Podcaster or Vocal Artist who is in the market for a great all-in-one recording device that's ultra compact and portable, but doesn't compromise on voice quality, the RODE NT-USB is a great option for you. If you'd like to learn more about the RODE NT-USB please visit RODE's website at www.rodemic.com. - - - - - - - - - - - - - If you want to be part of the world's largest online community for singing where great professionalists will review your singing, don't miss the chance and use the 50% Discount Code for "Review my singing" Forum: TMVWorld50 View full articles
  11. Recording plugins are some of the most essential and fun additions for any home recording. The quality and variety of recording plugins available today is simply miraculous. With the right choice of plugins, and a little bit of skill at home recording, an experienced home recording engineer can produce recordings that sound very professional! Plugins are not just for vocal effects. They are also available to simulate vintage preamps, compressors and even recording consoles like the famed SSL console system. In the world of plugins for digital audio work stations, (DAWs), there is no company that does a better job then waves. Visit www.waves.com and learn more about how you can make your home recordings sound professional! TOP RECOMMENDED WAVES PLUGINS FOR RECORDING VOCALS! CLICK HERE TO VISIT WAVES RECOMMENDED VOCAL PLUGINS AT WAVES: CLA VOCALS * JJP VOCALS * EDDIE KRAMER VOCAL CHANNEL MASARATI VX1 * BUTCH VIG VOCALS * VOCAL RIDER * HR REVERB HR ECHO REAL ADT APHEX VINTAGE AURAL EXCITER WAVES TUNE WAVES TUNE LT DOUBLER * DEBREATH DeEsser VITAMIN * RENAISSANCE VOX THE KING'S MICROPHONES AND A LOT MORE...! * Honorable Mentions... essential! Other Vocal Gear Required for a Complete Home Recording Include The Following Recommendations: A digital Audio Workstation - DAWs: LogicProX, Reaper, ProTools. A digital audio interface: We recommend the Scarlett digital audio interfaces from focusrite. A recording, condenser microphone: RODE Microphones: NT1, K2 Pearlman Microphones See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. Headphones: Extreme Isolation x-29s. See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. A Reflextion Fliter: SE Electronics Reflexion Filter Pro Ambience. A Pop Filter: See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions.
  12. Recording plugins are some of the most essential and fun additions for any home recording. The quality and variety of recording plugins available today is simply miraculous. With the right choice of plugins, and a little bit of skill at home recording, an experienced home recording engineer can produce recordings that sound very professional! Plugins are not just for vocal effects. They are also available to simulate vintage preamps, compressors and even recording consoles like the famed SSL console system. In the world of plugins for digital audio work stations, (DAWs), there is no company that does a better job then waves. Visit www.waves.com and learn more about how you can make your home recordings sound professional! Recording plugins are some of the most essential and fun additions for any home recording. The quality and variety of recording plugins available today is simply miraculous. With the right choice of plugins, and a little bit of skill at home recording, an experienced home recording engineer can produce recordings that sound very professional! Plugins are not just for vocal effects. They are also available to simulate vintage preamps, compressors and even recording consoles like the famed SSL console system. In the world of plugins for digital audio work stations, (DAWs), there is no company that does a better job then waves. Visit www.waves.com and learn more about how you can make your home recordings sound professional! TOP RECOMMENDED WAVES PLUGINS FOR RECORDING VOCALS! CLICK HERE TO VISIT WAVES RECOMMENDED VOCAL PLUGINS AT WAVES: CLA VOCALS * JJP VOCALS * EDDIE KRAMER VOCAL CHANNEL MASARATI VX1 * BUTCH VIG VOCALS * VOCAL RIDER * HR REVERB HR ECHO REAL ADT APHEX VINTAGE AURAL EXCITER WAVES TUNE WAVES TUNE LT DOUBLER * DEBREATH DeEsser VITAMIN * RENAISSANCE VOX THE KING'S MICROPHONES AND A LOT MORE...! * Honorable Mentions... essential! Other Vocal Gear Required for a Complete Home Recording Include The Following Recommendations: A digital Audio Workstation - DAWs: LogicProX, Reaper, ProTools. A digital audio interface: We recommend the Scarlett digital audio interfaces from focusrite. A recording, condenser microphone: RODE Microphones: NT1, K2 Pearlman Microphones See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. Headphones: Extreme Isolation x-29s. See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. A Reflextion Fliter: SE Electronics Reflexion Filter Pro Ambience. A Pop Filter: See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. View full articles
  13. If you have any questions about these products, please feel free to contact me on The Modern Vocalist or send me an email at robert@thevocaliststudio.com and we can talk your specific application. THE VOCALIST GIG BAG TOOLS & TECHNOLOGY FOR SINGERS: FROM ROBERT LUNTE & THE VOCALIST STUDIO: CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD TVS VOCALIST'S GIG BAG VIDEO OR WATCH BELOW! Microphones: - RODE M1 - RODE M2 http://www.rode.com/ - Electro-Voice 767a http://www.electrovoice.com - HEIL PR-35 http://www.heilsound.com - Telefunken M-80 http://www.telefunken-elektroakustik.com - Sennheiser 935 http://www.sennheiserusa.com - TC-Helicon MP-75 http://www.tc-helicon.com - AKG D7 http://www.akg.com Processing: TC-Helicon VoiceTone Pedals http://www.tc-helicon.com/voicetone-create-xt.asp - Create (EFX) - Doubler (simulates studio doubling) - Correct (compression) - Singles Pedals Wireless Microphone Solution - Samson Airline 77 http://www.samsontech.com/products/productpage.cfm?prodID=2018 Check That Mic Sanitary Wipes for Microphones http://www.checkthatmic.com VocoPro (HERO – RV) For Practicing and Writing: http://www.vocopro.com/products/product_info.php?ID=649 Extreme Isolation Headphones – X-29s: http://www.extremeheadphones.com/ex-29.html Vishudda Singer's Tea: http://aromatherapyinhaler.net/product/vishudda-singers-tea-kit-2/ Olympus Hand held Digital Recorder (The WS Series): http://www.olympusamerica.com/cpg_section/cpg_voicerecorders.asp Etymotic Ear Protection for Singers http://www.etymotic.com Hercules Mic Stand: http://www.herculesstands.com/mics/micstands.html PocketTone Pitch Pipe: www.PocketTones.com *Add this code to save $1. Special TVS Deal! (TMV08pt) Lyric Writing Software: www.masterwriter.com *Add this code to save $20. Special TVS Deal! (3059) Pen & Paper: Binder with all your bed tracks & lyrics:
  14. If you have any questions about these products, please feel free to contact me on The Modern Vocalist or send me an email at robert@thevocaliststudio.com and we can talk your specific application. THE VOCALIST GIG BAG TOOLS & TECHNOLOGY FOR SINGERS: FROM ROBERT LUNTE & THE VOCALIST STUDIO: CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD TVS VOCALIST'S GIG BAG VIDEO OR WATCH BELOW! Microphones: - RODE M1 - RODE M2 http://www.rode.com/ - Electro-Voice 767a http://www.electrovoice.com - HEIL PR-35 http://www.heilsound.com - Telefunken M-80 http://www.telefunken-elektroakustik.com - Sennheiser 935 http://www.sennheiserusa.com - TC-Helicon MP-75 http://www.tc-helicon.com - AKG D7 http://www.akg.com Processing: TC-Helicon VoiceTone Pedals http://www.tc-helicon.com/voicetone-create-xt.asp - Create (EFX) - Doubler (simulates studio doubling) - Correct (compression) - Singles Pedals Wireless Microphone Solution - Samson Airline 77 http://www.samsontech.com/products/productpage.cfm?prodID=2018 Check That Mic Sanitary Wipes for Microphones http://www.checkthatmic.com VocoPro (HERO – RV) For Practicing and Writing: http://www.vocopro.com/products/product_info.php?ID=649 Extreme Isolation Headphones – X-29s: http://www.extremeheadphones.com/ex-29.html Vishudda Singer's Tea: http://aromatherapyinhaler.net/product/vishudda-singers-tea-kit-2/ Olympus Hand held Digital Recorder (The WS Series): http://www.olympusamerica.com/cpg_section/cpg_voicerecorders.asp Etymotic Ear Protection for Singers http://www.etymotic.com Hercules Mic Stand: http://www.herculesstands.com/mics/micstands.html PocketTone Pitch Pipe: www.PocketTones.com *Add this code to save $1. Special TVS Deal! (TMV08pt) Lyric Writing Software: www.masterwriter.com *Add this code to save $20. Special TVS Deal! (3059) Pen & Paper: Binder with all your bed tracks & lyrics: View full articles
  15. The TMV World Vocal Gear Recommendations! This forum is designed to capture recommendations from the members of The Modern Vocalist World regarding vocal gear. Please share with the community your top recommendations regarding microphones, vocal effects, vocal pedals, home recording gear, DAWs, vocal health products and any other products and services that would be of interest for this singing community. Recommendations from the community will then be added to the customer built, TMV Vocal Gear Store. The Vocal Gear Store will save you time because all the products have been tried and tested by the TMV World Membership. Those that post and share their recommendations, we thank you for your time and contributions. Visit The Vocal Gear Store!
  16. Version

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    John Gresko is the founder of Direct Sound and inventor of Extreme Isolation Headphones. The best isolation headphones available to singers in the world. John Gresko www.ExtremeHeadphones.com

    Free

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    Bob Heil is an American sound and radio engineer most well known for creating the template for modern rock sound systems. He founded the company Heil Sound in 1966, which went on to create unique touring sound systems for bands such as The Grateful Dead and The Who. He invented the Heil Talk Box in 1973, which was frequently used by musicians such as Peter Frampton, Joe Walsh and Richie Sambora, and is still in use today. Heil has been an innovator in the field of amateur radio, manufacturing microphones and satellite dishes for broadcasters and live sound engineers. In the late 1980s Heil Sound became one of the first American companies to create and install Home Theaters, and Heil has lectured at major electronic conventions and taught classes at various institutions. He has won multiple awards and honors, and in 2007 he was to be invited to exhibit at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Enjoy this exclusive interview from TMV World. Bob Heil www.HEILSound.com

    Free

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    Peter Freedman is the founder of RØDE Microphones, an Australian-based designer and manufacturer of microphones, related accessories and audio software. Its products are used in studio and location sound recording as well as live sound reinforcement. Peter Freedman www.RODEMicrophones.com

    Free

  19. Version

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    Dave Pearlman builds custom microphones for the studio. Enjoy this discussion regarding his process and views on recording microphones. Dave Pearlman www.PearlmanMicrophones.com

    Free

  20. A large part of vocal training involves learning vocal control. Without vocal control, any vocal recording will suffer dreadfully. With it, you can do things you can only dream about without it. Another problem with lack of control is that if you are singing with any degree of power, you are going to experience a lot more vocal fatigue and risk damage to your instrument if you sing too long. With it, you can sing all day and not experience vocal strain. Yes, it's true! And a lack of control will cause you and your recording team frustration, or you'll just give up and settle for the best you and they think you can do. Usually, it's a huge waste of time and resources. Live performances are more forgiving of slight control issues, but studio singing requires surgically accurate control. So what am I talking about? For a great recording, you need vocal technique skills that will enable you to: Control volume. (Without it, your engineer will have to use excessive compression to even out volume, control distortion and bring soft sounds up so they can be heard. Some degree of "riding the faders" and compression is normal and usual, but the less the better. The less your vocals need to be compressed, the richer the resulting sound.) Control vocal lics and embellishments. (Without it, you will not be able to sing some vocal lics you attempt; "scats" or phrasing nuances will not "turn" well or flow evenly.) Control vibrato. (Without it, your vibrato will be too much, too little, uneven or inappropriately applied.) Control tone color. (Without it, the tone color of your voice will be too "covered", "hooty", "edgy", harsh, numb and boring or just plain wrong for the message. Your choices of tone of voice will be seriously limited, and your voice will sound small and/or unpleasant.) Control articulation. (Without it, you will over-, or more usually, under- pronounce the lyrics. There are differing degrees of articulation appropriate for different genres and tempos and types of lyrics. Singers must be able to know and apply the proper way to form words for their songs. For instance, blues music is pronounced more slurry. Hip- hop generally has sharper attacks. Pop is usually articulated clearer. Musical theater diction usually needs to be very crisp, but if you try to use this kind of diction in a pop song you will sound fake. But all songs should be understood, or the connection to the audience is not going to be made well.) Control sibilance. (Without this, recording your vocal can be a nightmare because too much sibilance hurts the listener's ears! And fixing excessive "s" sounds with de-"ss'ers always limits the quality of sound. A related problem is the popping of "p"s and other consonants. You must be able to control your consonants even while you clearly form them.) Control dynamic expression. (Without it, you will over-express and sound fake, under-express and bore the listener out of their minds, or bring too many changing emotional levels to the song to sound authentic and really move the heart of your listener. You have to know how to express the emotion of the lyric like a great actor delivering lines that invite an emotional response to the message.) Control the beginnings and ends of each phrase. (Without it, you will have trouble getting the beginning of the line right. You will drop off the ends of your sentences, robbing the listener of the complete thought. You will also find yourself with a lack of other kinds of control of initiating and ending lines, because you didn't set yourself up properly before entering the phrase or you've dropped your controlling support too early.) Control rhythm. (Without it, you will not be singing with the groove. You will be too early, too late or have inappropriate placement of lyrics via the beat. Again, different genres ask for different places the lyric should fit with the beat, but you have to know what your genre norms are and have the ability to sing with the beat that way. For instance, hip-hop usually has the lyric slightly behind the beat, pop usually right on top of it, gospel and big band "Sinatra" types are flexibly in and around the beat, but you really have to sing with a lot of the masters to get this authentically right.) Control pitch. (Without it, your engineer will have to tune the vocal too much, resulting in a mechanistic, artificial sound. You may be so inconsistent and inaccurate that tuning becomes almost impossible, because the tuner "grabs" the wrong pitch or can't draw the lic well enough to sound natural. Your bended notes may be so far off there is no way to make them sound in tune. Fact: The less you have to tune a vocal, the better. Don't get complacent here and think you can just have your engineer fix it in the mix. You'll be unpleasantly surprised.) Can you think of other types of control issues you've found in the studio? Which of these would you like to know more about? This essay first published September 21, 2009 on The Modern Vocalist.com the Internet's #1 community for vocal professionals, voice health practitioners and pro-audio companies worldwide since November 2008.
  21. A large part of vocal training involves learning vocal control. Without vocal control, any vocal recording will suffer dreadfully. With it, you can do things you can only dream about without it. Another problem with lack of control is that if you are singing with any degree of power, you are going to experience a lot more vocal fatigue and risk damage to your instrument if you sing too long. With it, you can sing all day and not experience vocal strain. Yes, it's true! And a lack of control will cause you and your recording team frustration, or you'll just give up and settle for the best you and they think you can do. Usually, it's a huge waste of time and resources. Live performances are more forgiving of slight control issues, but studio singing requires surgically accurate control. So what am I talking about? For a great recording, you need vocal technique skills that will enable you to: Control volume. (Without it, your engineer will have to use excessive compression to even out volume, control distortion and bring soft sounds up so they can be heard. Some degree of "riding the faders" and compression is normal and usual, but the less the better. The less your vocals need to be compressed, the richer the resulting sound.) Control vocal lics and embellishments. (Without it, you will not be able to sing some vocal lics you attempt; "scats" or phrasing nuances will not "turn" well or flow evenly.) Control vibrato. (Without it, your vibrato will be too much, too little, uneven or inappropriately applied.) Control tone color. (Without it, the tone color of your voice will be too "covered", "hooty", "edgy", harsh, numb and boring or just plain wrong for the message. Your choices of tone of voice will be seriously limited, and your voice will sound small and/or unpleasant.) Control articulation. (Without it, you will over-, or more usually, under- pronounce the lyrics. There are differing degrees of articulation appropriate for different genres and tempos and types of lyrics. Singers must be able to know and apply the proper way to form words for their songs. For instance, blues music is pronounced more slurry. Hip- hop generally has sharper attacks. Pop is usually articulated clearer. Musical theater diction usually needs to be very crisp, but if you try to use this kind of diction in a pop song you will sound fake. But all songs should be understood, or the connection to the audience is not going to be made well.) Control sibilance. (Without this, recording your vocal can be a nightmare because too much sibilance hurts the listener's ears! And fixing excessive "s" sounds with de-"ss'ers always limits the quality of sound. A related problem is the popping of "p"s and other consonants. You must be able to control your consonants even while you clearly form them.) Control dynamic expression. (Without it, you will over-express and sound fake, under-express and bore the listener out of their minds, or bring too many changing emotional levels to the song to sound authentic and really move the heart of your listener. You have to know how to express the emotion of the lyric like a great actor delivering lines that invite an emotional response to the message.) Control the beginnings and ends of each phrase. (Without it, you will have trouble getting the beginning of the line right. You will drop off the ends of your sentences, robbing the listener of the complete thought. You will also find yourself with a lack of other kinds of control of initiating and ending lines, because you didn't set yourself up properly before entering the phrase or you've dropped your controlling support too early.) Control rhythm. (Without it, you will not be singing with the groove. You will be too early, too late or have inappropriate placement of lyrics via the beat. Again, different genres ask for different places the lyric should fit with the beat, but you have to know what your genre norms are and have the ability to sing with the beat that way. For instance, hip-hop usually has the lyric slightly behind the beat, pop usually right on top of it, gospel and big band "Sinatra" types are flexibly in and around the beat, but you really have to sing with a lot of the masters to get this authentically right.) Control pitch. (Without it, your engineer will have to tune the vocal too much, resulting in a mechanistic, artificial sound. You may be so inconsistent and inaccurate that tuning becomes almost impossible, because the tuner "grabs" the wrong pitch or can't draw the lic well enough to sound natural. Your bended notes may be so far off there is no way to make them sound in tune. Fact: The less you have to tune a vocal, the better. Don't get complacent here and think you can just have your engineer fix it in the mix. You'll be unpleasantly surprised.) Can you think of other types of control issues you've found in the studio? Which of these would you like to know more about? This essay first published September 21, 2009 on The Modern Vocalist.com the Internet's #1 community for vocal professionals, voice health practitioners and pro-audio companies worldwide since November 2008. View full articles