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Found 8 results

  1. The Mystery behind Key Change

    For the pipe organ an open valve will trigger the sound of the pipe. The key of a song tells us which valves we can open safely to stay in harmony. Singers have a comfort zone All singers have a comfort zone, a range of notes that sound best and can be performed effortless. Despite of the ability to expand the vocal range through training, every singer has an individual physical quality which is responsible for the position of the comfort zone within the vocal spectrum. We may not consciously observe this, but the habit of speaking is already giving us a clue about this range. In classic musical education we classify this range by defining voice types, though this method is mostly a helpful convergence to reality. For the singer it is therefore essential to spend some effort on song choice, especially to ensure that a song lies within his or her vocal abilities. Of course that is not the only consideration during song choice, and if you are interested we invite you to read our article "Improve Your Song Choice" to find out more. Another possibility is to simply change the range of notes to be performed by changing the key of the song. The original key Every song was written in an original key. The key we know for any of these songs could be the one it was written in, or it could be the key used when the recording we know was produced. We still refer to it as original key. Original keys are usually relatively easy to access. They may be documented in sheet music, or available in databases, per example for DJ's that research harmonic mixing, among other sources. It also can be determined by examining the chords and notes of the song. It is to mention that a key can and oftentimes does change within a song. The key a song is regarded to be in is most often starting in the key and at one point returning to the same key before the end. Find out what exactly a key is, and how keys are transitioned in our article "Musical Keys and the Key Change". Here is an example. A song written or performed in a G Major key is based on the tonic note of G, and includes a system of notes defined by the major scale that is also based on the tonic note. The chord progressions used in the song will to a great extent lie within the scale, with the tonic chord being the foundation of those progressions. What happens between the use of G Major may be harmonic movement and/or modulation. Lead Vocals and original keys Here at Lead Vocals we consider our practice section as a tool to quickly review and learn the melody, timing, phrasing, and mood of a performance. In addition we think that the tool enables vocalists to study other artists by paying close attention to ingredients like dialect and pronunciation in language, the choice of placing words or phrases within rhythm and beats, any habits, and style and musical influences. Unlike other existing tools like per example some karaoke platforms we do not offer access to the same performance in multiple keys. But just recently we have introduced additional helpful information about many of the songs available here within the tagging system. At present we offer selection by tonic pitch, musical key, and scale information which can be helpful to explore new music. We think that from an educational point of view the choice of the tonic pitch is most interesting, because many melodies in songs may start or end with the tonic note. If a vocalist can deliver that note in a rich, strong, and compelling tonal quality that makes the audience want to hear more, then the song choice by tonic pitch may lead to the discovery of suitable songs for the singer. You may give this a try by selecting a song to practice by tonic pitch. Continue solving the mystery Find out why vocalists change the key of a song and how they approach the key change. In an attempt to solve the mystery behind the musical key we define what a key is, and explain the background of harmonic movement, chord progressions, and modulation. We also include the consideration of emotional characteristics for all keys based on the major and minor scale, that may play an additional role in the selection process for the vocalist. Further we're taking a brief look at common practice in recording sessions. Continue reading about this topic in our article "Musical Keys and the Key Change" at http://www.leadvocals.ca/background/musical-keys-and-the-key-change Additional Information Our Practice Section at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/practice Try to Sing Along at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/lyrics/songs What is Lead Vocals? Lead Vocals is a free of charge online resource for aspiring vocalists, who are learning the craft of singing and who practice their art by singing along to playback recordings and to other selected musical performances on video. All recordings are hand selected and the lyrics are spot on matching to the performance of the lead vocalist. The tool allows for quick access to practice specific parts within a song. We especially took care in avoiding clutter and disruptive advertising. Follow us on Social Media https://facebook.com/leadvocals.ca https://plus.google.com/+LeadvocalsCa https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadvocals https://www.twitter.com/leadvocalsca https://www.youtube.com/LeadvocalsCa
  2. An example for the use of music is its distribution to people through a sound system. If a singer, instrumentalist or a band wants to record, use, or perform music that is owned or controlled by somebody else, it is very likely that a license has to be obtained to do this on legal ground. Find out what kind of licenses control the use and recreation of music compositions, audio recordings, the use of music in public, the reproduction of sheet music, and the performance of theatrical productions. At Lead Vocals we also offer links and services to help you obtaining licenses for cover songs. The purpose of licensing The purpose of music licensing is to make sure that the people and companies involved in the creation process of music, like per example the composer, the record label, the performing artist, and the publisher will get paid for the work and effort they have put into a piece of music. Allowing somebody to use a piece of music either as a composition, or as a recording, can be understood like a trade between the creator and the licensee. Per example, if an artist is recording a cover song of another artist and is then distributing and selling that song on his or her own album release, he or she must ensure that the original composer of that song gets a share in form of a royalty. A royalty is a sum of money paid to the rights holder for each copy of a work sold, or for each public performance of a work. In common practice such royalties are most often calculated and collected in advance during the phase of producing the copies. Types of music licenses It is to mention that we in general distinguish between different kinds of uses for music, its recordings, and its production. Here is an overview with examples for the most common types of music licenses: In general a license is necessary when the task is done by someone, who did not create the work. The overview shows a common example, but is in no way a complete reference. If you are interested in reading deeper into the topic please continue reading our article at - http://www.leadvocals.ca/background/music-licensing Additional Information License a Cover Song http://www.leadvocals.ca/resources/license-a-cover-song Our Practice Section at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/practice Try to Sing Along at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/lyrics/songs What is Lead Vocals? Lead Vocals is a free of charge online resource for aspiring vocalists, who are learning the craft of singing and who practice their art by singing along to playback recordings and to other selected musical performances on video. All recordings are hand selected and the lyrics are spot on matching to the performance of the lead vocalist. The tool allows for quick access to practice specific parts within a song. We especially took care in avoiding clutter and disruptive advertising. Follow us on Social Media https://facebook.com/leadvocals.ca https://plus.google.com/+LeadvocalsCa https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadvocals https://www.twitter.com/leadvocalsca https://www.youtube.com/LeadvocalsCa
  3. Really would like to get some helpful criticism on my first song I have on the radio in order to improve my vocal performance. The song is "Love Like You" All the songs on Early Mornings, Late Nights, and Long Roads were written and composed by me and were produced by Joel Kazmi--who’s worked with artists like The Tea Party, Rush, N’sync, Sum 41, and Anne Murray. If you don't want to listen that is absolutely cool and if you can recommend some new music or mention any great shows you've seen lately, that would be great. Cheers! edit by moderator: link removed
  4. Proper Breathing for Vocalists

    Proper Breathing for Vocalists Breath is the motor of our voice. Knowing how to breathe correctly and being able to control it is one of the most important skills a singer can have. A proper breathing technique will enable us to sound great and to improve the tone of our voice. Our ability to sustain notes will increase and we will master to sing longer phrases more effortless. Breathing is a natural process of our body and therefore a good breathing technique comes natural and unforced. Methods of Breathing The human body knows several different ways of breathing which are called costal or chest breathing, clavicular breathing, abdominal or belly breathing, and diapragmatic breathing. The latter two are to prefer when it comes to singing, though only the diapragmatic method allows for full breath with maximum control. The diaphragm by the way is a muscle system that is located in the abdominal region right under the lungs. It controls the air flow by contracting when we breathe in and relaxing when we breathe out. Breath Support As a singer you want to learn slowing down the relaxation of the diaphragm to gain extra volume used for sustaining notes and sing longer phrases. This is called "breath support" and can be achieved in two different ways, either by adding a bit of muscle force during exhalation and while using your voice, or through lowering the muscle force used during inhalation. While the first method allows for an increased volume the latter will result in less air pressure in the lungs which in turn will slow down the exhalation process to the extent that you can sing longer. The second method is popular through the "Italian School" of singing, also known as Appoggio, which includes resonance factors in form of phonation alongside the breath management. Exercises to improve breathing Understanding the theory behind how the body masters the task of breathing builds the base for the vocalist to improve upon his or her own breathing technique, however the singer also needs to build an understanding on an experimental level. For this reason it is well worth to experiment with a few exercises to gain an additional understanding. At Lead Vocals we have collected a number of exercises to get you started. Continue reading about the topic and these exercises at - http://www.leadvocals.ca/improve/breathing Additional Information Our Practice Section at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/practice Try to Sing Along at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/lyrics/songs What is Lead Vocals? Lead Vocals is a free of charge online resource for aspiring vocalists, who are learning the craft of singing and who practice their art by singing along to playback recordings and to other selected musical performances on video. All recordings are hand selected and the lyrics are spot on matching to the performance of the lead vocalist. The tool allows for quick access to practice specific parts within a song. We especially took care in avoiding clutter and disruptive advertising. Follow us on Social Media https://facebook.com/leadvocals.ca https://plus.google.com/+LeadvocalsCa https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadvocals https://www.twitter.com/leadvocalsca https://www.youtube.com/LeadvocalsCa
  5. Hi! I'm new here so I'm sorry if I've done anything wrong. Either way, I just did a vocal range thing, and I went from C3 to a C6, but I managed to come up to E6+ but my voice got very squeaky. Many people have commented that I sing very high, and I really don't know what voice type I have. I have some trouble with singing very low, considering that my normal talking voice is low, but when singing high notes I don't have any problem at all, afterall, I prefer to do that. I'd like to do whistle tones, but I think it's better that I know what voice type I have before I do so so I won't damage my voice. What do you think?
  6. Hi TMV, Today I had to upload a few videos for an audition. Basically I sang for a few hours to get the takes just right, and it was more singing than I've been doing lately. Some of it was in the upper parts of my range. Long story short, after finishing everything, I tried hitting my upper notes a few minutes ago and I couldn't do it, I didn't have control over it, and it sounded really raspy, and not in a controlled way. I sound fine while speaking and I can sing lower down, and in the middle of my voice. There is no pain, and aside from the rough sound in the upper notes, there's no hoarseness. Could I have done permanent damage to my voice or is this just from tiredness and improper use of my voice? I admit I don't have perfect technique, and I chose a song that had a few parts that were too high for me. However now I'm worried I have nodules or something. Please do let me know what you think. I'm gonna go to a doctor in maybe 2-3 days if this doesn't change, but for now I'm trying not to panic, because it might not be anything serious.
  7. (Blues, Jazz singer Cheryl Hodge - author, is currently nominated for BEST BLUES SONG, 2011, at the Hollywood Music In Media Awards) People are always asking me about what my secrets have been for getting ahead in the music biz. It's almost like they think there is some magic answer that will help them move up the ladder. Well, in a funny way, maybe there is one. But you might not like the answer. There are basically three rules that I live by and have for 30 years. In order to succeed in the music biz (the simple answer), you need three basic ingredients. In time you will find that all three ingredients are inner-related, and that one hand scratches the other. You must have: 1.) A great musical product (it doesn't have to be original - but if you are going to do a cover, do it nothing like the original... avoid comparisons.) The first 20 seconds of the production have to be both innovative, infectious, and flawless. This has to be music so catchy that if you, yourself, had only enough money to buy one CD a year, this would be the one you would buy. Put yourself in the consumer's seat. Remember, we are presently in a devastating recession. Talk is cheap (there are lots of sales pitches out there), and money is dear. For someone to buy your music, they need to be really moved by you, in a way that no one else has. 2.) Relentless drive (unending belief in yourself). 99% of the artists who are successful did not "make it" over night. They knew, at the start, that they would most likely be in for a "long haul" before the public would become aware of them. The chances of being a huge success in the selling market are actually less than that of being kidnapped, believe it or not. When people see those odds, they tend to become daunted. The sooner you get started, the better. Look at former mouseketeers, Britney Spears, Justin Timberlake and Christine Aguilera. Starting early certainly gave them a "leg up" in the business. However, having said all this, it is truly never too late. At 56 years old, I am starting to be discovered in the biz. Why? Because I didn't give up. I believed in my music; I believed in myself. I knew my niche, as it were. I realized my market. The great Lou Rawls once said at a seminar that his golden rule for success was, "Never change your music to suit the public, and current trends. Do what YOU believe in. If you believe in your music, then sooner or later the public will, too." 3.) Business savvy. This is the one that some artists absolutely hate to acknowledge. Many believe that the words "business" and "artist" are polar opposites. Every year, a few songwriters approach me by saying that they feel that being a business-minded musician is the equivalent of "selling out". Interesting premise, but I beg to differ. Songs are a communication. If you believe in your art, then you will admit that you believe in communicating the message of the song with the most listeners you can possibly relay the song to. And now we get to the ultimate goal: exposure. You'll need to learn all about agents and managers. You will need to schedule out at least an hour per day of web work. You will need to know about tax shelters. You will need an office that includes: a computer, possibly (probably) a home studio, a phone/fax machine, a scanner, a filing cabinet, and a few absolutely great books about the music business. One of my personal favorites is Hal Galper's book, "The Touring Musician". The best way to find out what you like is to talk to some of the most successful people whom you have already made acquaintances with in the music business. Questions? Feel free to contact me at one of the following places: cherylhodge.com ,jazzboulevard.com, reverbnation.com, Jazz & Blues Artist, Cheryl Hodge (facebook) .
  8. (Blues, Jazz singer Cheryl Hodge - author, is currently nominated for BEST BLUES SONG, 2011, at the Hollywood Music In Media Awards) People are always asking me about what my secrets have been for getting ahead in the music biz. It's almost like they think there is some magic answer that will help them move up the ladder. Well, in a funny way, maybe there is one. But you might not like the answer. There are basically three rules that I live by and have for 30 years. In order to succeed in the music biz (the simple answer), you need three basic ingredients. In time you will find that all three ingredients are inner-related, and that one hand scratches the other. You must have: 1.) A great musical product (it doesn't have to be original - but if you are going to do a cover, do it nothing like the original... avoid comparisons.) The first 20 seconds of the production have to be both innovative, infectious, and flawless. This has to be music so catchy that if you, yourself, had only enough money to buy one CD a year, this would be the one you would buy. Put yourself in the consumer's seat. Remember, we are presently in a devastating recession. Talk is cheap (there are lots of sales pitches out there), and money is dear. For someone to buy your music, they need to be really moved by you, in a way that no one else has. 2.) Relentless drive (unending belief in yourself). 99% of the artists who are successful did not "make it" over night. They knew, at the start, that they would most likely be in for a "long haul" before the public would become aware of them. The chances of being a huge success in the selling market are actually less than that of being kidnapped, believe it or not. When people see those odds, they tend to become daunted. The sooner you get started, the better. Look at former mouseketeers, Britney Spears, Justin Timberlake and Christine Aguilera. Starting early certainly gave them a "leg up" in the business. However, having said all this, it is truly never too late. At 56 years old, I am starting to be discovered in the biz. Why? Because I didn't give up. I believed in my music; I believed in myself. I knew my niche, as it were. I realized my market. The great Lou Rawls once said at a seminar that his golden rule for success was, "Never change your music to suit the public, and current trends. Do what YOU believe in. If you believe in your music, then sooner or later the public will, too." 3.) Business savvy. This is the one that some artists absolutely hate to acknowledge. Many believe that the words "business" and "artist" are polar opposites. Every year, a few songwriters approach me by saying that they feel that being a business-minded musician is the equivalent of "selling out". Interesting premise, but I beg to differ. Songs are a communication. If you believe in your art, then you will admit that you believe in communicating the message of the song with the most listeners you can possibly relay the song to. And now we get to the ultimate goal: exposure. You'll need to learn all about agents and managers. You will need to schedule out at least an hour per day of web work. You will need to know about tax shelters. You will need an office that includes: a computer, possibly (probably) a home studio, a phone/fax machine, a scanner, a filing cabinet, and a few absolutely great books about the music business. One of my personal favorites is Hal Galper's book, "The Touring Musician". The best way to find out what you like is to talk to some of the most successful people whom you have already made acquaintances with in the music business. Questions? Feel free to contact me at one of the following places: cherylhodge.com ,jazzboulevard.com, reverbnation.com, Jazz & Blues Artist, Cheryl Hodge (facebook) . View full articles