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Found 22 results

  1. Hi, so just recorded this clip (No rain)(sorry for the quality, im traveling right now) but I want to know if im using the right technique, and if this is any closer to a good mix voice. Of course, a lot of things to work on regarding the song, but I'd like to know if im on the right track and what should I improve or work on for those high notes. At the end of the clip I also did a small comparison between a very nasal tone and a cleaner tone. Im not sure if this nasal tone is the right way (+ diaphram compression) to get a good distortion for heavier songs? Finally i also attached another clip (Paradise city) which is basically me playing around with this nasal tone quality to see if i get a good result. Thank you very much! cant wait to be singing these songs live:D
  2. https://app.box.com/s/hipoe5h4ahmj0f3f2n58hvkgkmy4du15 Here's a clip of me singing the chorus to "Lay Me Down" by Sam Smith. The highest note I'm hitting is an A4 (I'm singing it a half step higher than the original). As a comparison, here's a guy singing it on "The Voice": https://youtu.be/zAaVoMLblDY?t=34s To me, his sound is so much meatier and much more chesty. To me, my voice sounds like Barry Gibb from the Bee Gees or an Axl Rose. Nothing wrong with either of them, but not the effect I'm going for. Basically, my question is: If I continue to do meowing exercises / sirens / slides, will my tone eventually darken? Or am I doing something completely wrong to generate this tone? Other sub questions: Should I be enunciating these vowels more with the "ng" sound to try to resonate it more in my nose? Or should it feel more like a "ha" sound to try to bring up my chest more into the mix? Lastly, here's another sample of me singing high notes with a more "bottom to top" approach up to G4 (Wise men(G4) say..). My problem is, I feel like I'm definitely "pulling up" my chest voice to hit the G4 with that tone is pitchy and strained. The A4 I'm hitting in Lay Me Down doesn't strain me at all but it doesn't have the same timbre quality as this G4.
  3. I've been having throatiness problems recently. Like, it hurts and I find myself pushing sometimes, when I sing in head voice, or belt too high. It used to not hurt, even when I sing at the end of my range. But now it's hurting. It might be from doing too much vocal slides. Because I've been doing that a lot recently. I used to do it a lot before too. Back then when I started doing it, I started having throat problems too, and I just assumed vocal slides were causing it and I just stopped. And I returned to normal. Also when I went to voice lesson and warmed up, I didn't do any vocal slides and it didn't hurt to sing at the end of my range. But when I went to practice my head voice at home, I did vocal slides, and my voice started hurting again. Any advice on how to cure this? Thanks.
  4. I have the best edge and easiest mix in my voice in the morning, then on the afternoon I loose the edge and the mix often becomes forced. Even after a long warmup, I still don't find the same edge as in the morning. I don't talk a lot during the days, mostly working in front of a computer. One thing I have noticed earlier was that while working in front of a computer, when I got tired/dry in my eyes my I would lean my head upwards to be able to keep my eyes a little bit more closed. This stretched position of my throat caused a tired voice. Also swallowing and clearing my throat during the day seems to be a big no no. Even though I follow these rules, my voice is still tired in the afternoon.. any more ideas?
  5. Okay I've been training with Brett Manning's programs for about 3 years now. Got better but I'm frustrated with my vocal range. A vocal range upto A#4 is all I want for my singing. I'm a Tenor. So I've been hearing these concepts related to high notes. What I've realized is that people refer to the same thing by saying stuff like yawn, lift soft palate, cry and support. Also is the 'cry' necessary to hit the high notes in full voice cuz it sounds weird to me when I keep a cry on my notes. What are they doing? Singing in mix? Belting? Also would that be more towards SLS or classical typa technique. 2nd Thanks!
  6. Hi! I'm new to this forum! I have a question but don't know any one to ask! I'm practicing the mixed voice recently. But when I sing, record and listen again, I think it's so weird! I have no idea it is a mixed voice or something else. Some people said that it is a falsetto, some said that it is a light (or heady) mixed voice. So it makes me so confused! Please help me guys! Because I have been warned not to continue singing in that way Thanks for reading my topic!
  7. I tried to sing "let's Marvin Gaye and Get it on" by Charlie Puth but when the chorus comes He sing like this Charlie Puth - Marvin Gaye (Live) and I sing like this Let's Marvin Gaye and Get it On (cover). His voice sounds like the chest voice while my voice sounds like head voice What am i doing wrong? And how can i fix it?
  8. can someone critique my cover of "Rolling in the Deep" please? I'm practicing vocal runs/falsetto and would love any advice I can get please. A few things, At "We could've had it alllllll" my falsetto wavers every single time I try this. It's very low in my falsetto range but I can't switch to mixed voice that quickly. What is a god exercise that will help me transition quickly? I'm 20, male, and have been singing for about two years on and off. I think my breathing is okay at this point but I had some trouble breathing around the halfway point of this song until "We could've had it all". Thanks!
  9. "Je T'aime" : is a romantic French-pop ballad of Lara Fabian, included in the album “Pure” (1996), Lara Fabian is a multilingual Belgian, Canadian lyric soprano had sung songs in French, Italian, Spanish, and English, Portuguese, Hebrew and Greek.The song expresses the love and pain that a woman feels for her beloved!I Hope you enjoy it!Official Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ChryssanthemisModern Music Arts Facebook Page: :https://www.facebook.com/modernmusicartsModern Music Studios Facebook Page:https://www.facebook.com/modernmusica...Composition - Lyrics: Lara Fabian & Rick AlisonVideo Editing: Modern Music StudiosElectric Guitar: Steve SovoDrums: Fotis YiannopoulosBass Guitar: Dimitris VerginisPiano: Aikaterini DeliyiannidouKeyboards: Kleanthis Konstantinidis
  10. Hello! I want to share with you my Official Cover of the song At Last. Is a song of Etta James which is one of my biggest influences in jazz singing. The song’s lyrics refer to the love of a young woman that’s finally fulfilled. This song encapsulates the youth spirit of 1960’s. First Official Release: November 15,1960 by Etta James.The song was originally written by Mack Gordon and Harry Warren for the musical film Orchestra Wives (1941), starring George Montgomery and Ann Rutherford.I Hope you enjoy it!Recorded - Produced & Mastered at Modern Music Studios Official Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ChryssanthemisModern Music Arts Facebook Page: :https://www.facebook.com/modernmusicartsModern Music Studios Facebook Page:https://www.facebook.com/modernmusica...www.modernmusicstudios.comby:Chryssanthemis (Chrysanthi Papanikolaou) &Steve Sovolos Video Production: at Modern Music Studios.
  11. Just sang this today. What do you think? https://app.box.com/s/75h89q3s2sa5uxjnvld9z8rc5jfhzxzy -Ozzy
  12. To challenge myself to work on balancing my high mixed register [lightening it] I picked this song since the second half, even when taken down three steps, is freaking high for me. There's a bunch of Bb4's and B4's in here in what I would define as a heady mix, but I could be wrong. This was hard as hell, but I think I made some progress with not pulling up too much weight and choking on the sound past A4. Since there is literally an ascending "no" open vowel section in the song, it was advantageous to work on that and other phrases repeatedly with a slight laryngeal tilt but with something more like NAHs. Any and all feedback is welcome. https://app.box.com/s/tvxc0jf0o2yekadof0q54luqp6ojnxp4
  13. Phew!  This is one tough song.... This is a lesson in phrasing and vowel modification..    I think my mix has become stronger, so I thought I should give this song another go..  This is one take(except the chorus, which took multiple turns!).  I can't seem to get the first "Run to the hills" correctly.  To me, the "Run for your lives" which is the D5, sounds better...    This is the song with music...  https://app.box.com/s/zjry7z5yiyhshfnei0hs6dd9bo6fjvp3   and this is the raw vocals...  https://app.box.com/s/jjib0u9g3v70d6dj303qil87232fg2ug      
  14. Good singers are often described as having a unique personal style, a special way of expressing a song. But in the larger picture of singing, let's talk about vocal styles in general. First off, you want to be clear on which style you sing the most. Pop, rock, jazz, country, blues, R&B, classical, folk, gospel, Broadway belting or perhaps a combination of one or more of these styles? I frequently encounter singers who think they're singing in a pop style but are actually singing in a classical style because of prior training. It can sound quite strange and disorienting to the listener to hear someone sing in a wrong style. The conventions and techniques of classical singing are so different from popular, commercial styles that classical voice training can become a disability to the budding pop singer. Every vocal style is a recipe using only certain ingredients. Like a cook who knows the difference between braising and grilling, you should have an acquaintance with the recipe for your desired style. Let's start by comparing classical and non-classical styles: simply put, non-classical sounds like speaking or yelling and classical singing doesn't. If you've ever heard an opera singer speak then sing, you might be shocked to notice how different these two modes of vocal production are. Whether you sing classically or in a commercial vein, your choice of ingredients will determine if you're nailing your style or not. What are some of the ingredients of vocal style? Laryngeal Height - Your larynx (voice-box) can easily move up and down. Which vertical position you choose, regular, raised or lowered, will affect your sound. You might lower it for classical or soulful R&B and jazz, keep it regular for pop or legit Broadway singing, or raise it for rock and country. Airflow - How much air should you have in your sound? In country, there's typically not a lot of air coming through the vocal folds, but when singing sultry R&B or jazz, you may allow the folds to open more. Resonator Shape - What is the shape of your throat and mouth? For country, I recommend constricting the pharynx slightly under the jawline (never constrict the vocal folds themselves), while in classical or R&B I recommend widening that area to give me a more open sound. Shape decisions also include how open your mouth should be and if you're mostly smiling or pursing your lips. Nasality - Air which is routed through your nose creates the buzzy sound of nasality. Listen carefully to your favorite singers to see if you can discern how much nasality you hear. This important resonance is a must in rock and country, less so in pop and jazz, and not desirable in classical production. Dialect - Can you imagine hearing a country singer with a Russian accent? Or a blues singer with a French accent? Might sound strange. Consider a Southern accent for R&B and country, a standard American accent for pop and Broadway singing, perhaps even an English accent for classical. Stance - Ever notice how classical singers seem like they're leaning forward but some R&B singers may be leaning back on their heels? Subtle stance differences can make a difference in vocal production and are interesting to watch for. Volume - In sultry jazz singing, you may hear singers shift their volumes suddenly from loud to soft and back again, while in opera the vocal dynamics mostly range from loud to louder. Pop is often soft to medium loud, never getting very loud. When country, which is fairly soft to medium loud, gets louder, it then enters the world of country-rock. So volume can be a determining factor when combining styles. Stylisms - Each vocal style has particular stylisms which act as style hallmarks. For example, vocal fry can be heard in pop, jazz, and rock, which cry is common in country. Yodel can be heard in country and alternative pop, while stops are only heard in Broadway belting. There are different slides and swoops used and using the wrong swoop can get you into big stylistic trouble. Ornamental riffs such as R&B runs are important to master as well as classical ornamental runs called melisma or coloratura. Emotions - No one style has a monopoly on the human experience. For dignified and regal, no style comes closer than classical. If you want to express sensuality or ecstasy, look no further than R&B. Pop is sincere. alternative pop is quirky, rock is anti-social and powerful. You get the idea. A fun way to hone your style discernment skills is to sit at the ole radio tuner and go from station to station. See how quickly you come to a conclusion on the vocal style(s) you hear. It's not easy sometimes. Are you hearing country, pop-country, rock-country or R&B-country? Can you identify WHY you came to your conclusion? Remember that like in cooking (Thai, French, etc), each vocal style has conventions; rules that have developed over time. These conventions arise out of the particular culture and history which are the roots of a style. Listen and watch your favorite singers. Everything you see or hear helps to determine style choices. Styles are not accidents- make sure your style choices are well thought-out. Your next step? Pick a style, listen to the greats, observe everything, imitate, THEN play around to creative your own unique expressive masterpiece. Stay true to your style before you venture forth into uncharted territory. Lisa Popeil - Voiceworks Method - www.popeil.com 818-906-7229
  15. Good singers are often described as having a unique personal style, a special way of expressing a song. But in the larger picture of singing, let's talk about vocal styles in general. First off, you want to be clear on which style you sing the most. Pop, rock, jazz, country, blues, R&B, classical, folk, gospel, Broadway belting or perhaps a combination of one or more of these styles? I frequently encounter singers who think they're singing in a pop style but are actually singing in a classical style because of prior training. It can sound quite strange and disorienting to the listener to hear someone sing in a wrong style. The conventions and techniques of classical singing are so different from popular, commercial styles that classical voice training can become a disability to the budding pop singer. Every vocal style is a recipe using only certain ingredients. Like a cook who knows the difference between braising and grilling, you should have an acquaintance with the recipe for your desired style. Let's start by comparing classical and non-classical styles: simply put, non-classical sounds like speaking or yelling and classical singing doesn't. If you've ever heard an opera singer speak then sing, you might be shocked to notice how different these two modes of vocal production are. Whether you sing classically or in a commercial vein, your choice of ingredients will determine if you're nailing your style or not. What are some of the ingredients of vocal style? Laryngeal Height - Your larynx (voice-box) can easily move up and down. Which vertical position you choose, regular, raised or lowered, will affect your sound. You might lower it for classical or soulful R&B and jazz, keep it regular for pop or legit Broadway singing, or raise it for rock and country. Airflow - How much air should you have in your sound? In country, there's typically not a lot of air coming through the vocal folds, but when singing sultry R&B or jazz, you may allow the folds to open more. Resonator Shape - What is the shape of your throat and mouth? For country, I recommend constricting the pharynx slightly under the jawline (never constrict the vocal folds themselves), while in classical or R&B I recommend widening that area to give me a more open sound. Shape decisions also include how open your mouth should be and if you're mostly smiling or pursing your lips. Nasality - Air which is routed through your nose creates the buzzy sound of nasality. Listen carefully to your favorite singers to see if you can discern how much nasality you hear. This important resonance is a must in rock and country, less so in pop and jazz, and not desirable in classical production. Dialect - Can you imagine hearing a country singer with a Russian accent? Or a blues singer with a French accent? Might sound strange. Consider a Southern accent for R&B and country, a standard American accent for pop and Broadway singing, perhaps even an English accent for classical. Stance - Ever notice how classical singers seem like they're leaning forward but some R&B singers may be leaning back on their heels? Subtle stance differences can make a difference in vocal production and are interesting to watch for. Volume - In sultry jazz singing, you may hear singers shift their volumes suddenly from loud to soft and back again, while in opera the vocal dynamics mostly range from loud to louder. Pop is often soft to medium loud, never getting very loud. When country, which is fairly soft to medium loud, gets louder, it then enters the world of country-rock. So volume can be a determining factor when combining styles. Stylisms - Each vocal style has particular stylisms which act as style hallmarks. For example, vocal fry can be heard in pop, jazz, and rock, which cry is common in country. Yodel can be heard in country and alternative pop, while stops are only heard in Broadway belting. There are different slides and swoops used and using the wrong swoop can get you into big stylistic trouble. Ornamental riffs such as R&B runs are important to master as well as classical ornamental runs called melisma or coloratura. Emotions - No one style has a monopoly on the human experience. For dignified and regal, no style comes closer than classical. If you want to express sensuality or ecstasy, look no further than R&B. Pop is sincere. alternative pop is quirky, rock is anti-social and powerful. You get the idea. A fun way to hone your style discernment skills is to sit at the ole radio tuner and go from station to station. See how quickly you come to a conclusion on the vocal style(s) you hear. It's not easy sometimes. Are you hearing country, pop-country, rock-country or R&B-country? Can you identify WHY you came to your conclusion? Remember that like in cooking (Thai, French, etc), each vocal style has conventions; rules that have developed over time. These conventions arise out of the particular culture and history which are the roots of a style. Listen and watch your favorite singers. Everything you see or hear helps to determine style choices. Styles are not accidents- make sure your style choices are well thought-out. Your next step? Pick a style, listen to the greats, observe everything, imitate, THEN play around to creative your own unique expressive masterpiece. Stay true to your style before you venture forth into uncharted territory. Lisa Popeil - Voiceworks Method - www.popeil.com 818-906-7229 View full articles
  16. Do you feel trapped and anxious about your career? If so cut yourself some slack. It's completely normal to have anxiety when you feel like a victim to your situation. It's also common to think that your opportunities will come from outside of you. It's not unusual to think that someone else will come along and make you successful and that without this opportunity you are destined to live a life in the shadows never realizing your dream. While it's true that we need other people to help us grow our careers, and sometimes they offer opportunities that help us a great deal, it's you who creates them even if it doesn't seem that way. The common denominator in your experience is YOU. It is always YOU at the helm. The problem that has existed in the music business for a long while is that because it used to be SO expensive to record (still is but it's more accessible than it used to be) artists needed a company to support them even in start up. You couldn't record a record without a label. Now with the advent of technology making it less expensive to record, artists are able to fund their own records, eliminating the need for a label. However, just because you can put out a record, doesn't mean you have the budget to promote it and this is where most indie artists fall short. The other issue is that artists live more in their right brain. They are often accused of not having organizational or business skills. This is, for the most part absolutely true. That's why you are an artist: your tremendous artistic talent in the right hemisphere. But, more and more artists are learning how to use both sides of their brains and are integrating business skills as a part of their everyday tasks. So that concept is falling away as it should. Artists are capable of business and to integrate both. But it's tricky. Particularly if you are resisting it. The next piece of the puzzle is the sensitive nature of artists and the natural tendency to want to be recognized or rescued. Given that most artists are wounded, the narcissistic injury sets up a natural do you love me, need me, want me? need for approval which is the perfect setup for the starving-artist-someone-please-come-rescue-me syndrome. How do I know? Cause I have it too. The difference is recognizing it, owning it and not falling prey to its deception. It's the process of reclaiming your power and renouncing victim-hood working on the inner dialogue and doing the work, learning how to center yourself and staying at cause for your universe. Once you realize that regardless of circumstances past, that in current reality, the ball is in your court entirely, you start to free yourself from the prison of the past. Once you accept the past and forgive it, you can get on the road to helping yourself and eventually winning your dream life. How do I know? Cause I did-the-work-and-made-a-successful-life I've been right where you are and I made it! Here's my: 2013 Soul-based, Free + Independently Wealthy Music Artist Mindset Checklist I take full responsibility for the creation of my world. No one or nothing is to blame for the contents of my life but me. Wherever I am on the Evolutionary Line of my career is absolutely perfect and essential for me to grow to the next level. I embrace exactly where I am so I can keep moving forward. I know that sometimes I am limited in what I believe to be possible for my life and music. I ask that those limits grow and expand beyond where I can imagine right now, every day. I also take full responsibility for the way that I see things. It is up to me to grow and change to fit who I want to become. It's not up to anyone else but me. I seek out opportunities to grow and improve my mindset. I realize that sometimes circumstances outside of my control seem to set me back, but I will accept that life has curve balls that force me to grow. Stress is a sign that I am growing. My success is completely dependent upon the way that I think and perceive. I can only perceive what I already have inside of me. I ask that my consciousness expand to encompass elevated ways of thinking and perceiving so that I can attract the life I desire. I am committed to growing and becoming a better person, musician, and someone who contributes to others. I am dedicated to the evolution of myself and our beautiful planet in the larger universe. I am capable of all that I desire let it start today. Print and post these on your bulletin board or wall. Make a note to uplevel your mindset with these new thought patterns or as Gabrielle Bernstein would say your Miracle Mindset. You are the captain of your future course correct every day until it becomes habit to think with a miracle mindset. Here's to a mind-blowing 2013!! ©2013 Cari Cole, Vocal Mag, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  17. Do you feel trapped and anxious about your career? If so cut yourself some slack. It's completely normal to have anxiety when you feel like a victim to your situation. It's also common to think that your opportunities will come from outside of you. It's not unusual to think that someone else will come along and make you successful and that without this opportunity you are destined to live a life in the shadows never realizing your dream. While it's true that we need other people to help us grow our careers, and sometimes they offer opportunities that help us a great deal, it's you who creates them even if it doesn't seem that way. The common denominator in your experience is YOU. It is always YOU at the helm. The problem that has existed in the music business for a long while is that because it used to be SO expensive to record (still is but it's more accessible than it used to be) artists needed a company to support them even in start up. You couldn't record a record without a label. Now with the advent of technology making it less expensive to record, artists are able to fund their own records, eliminating the need for a label. However, just because you can put out a record, doesn't mean you have the budget to promote it and this is where most indie artists fall short. The other issue is that artists live more in their right brain. They are often accused of not having organizational or business skills. This is, for the most part absolutely true. That's why you are an artist: your tremendous artistic talent in the right hemisphere. But, more and more artists are learning how to use both sides of their brains and are integrating business skills as a part of their everyday tasks. So that concept is falling away as it should. Artists are capable of business and to integrate both. But it's tricky. Particularly if you are resisting it. The next piece of the puzzle is the sensitive nature of artists and the natural tendency to want to be recognized or rescued. Given that most artists are wounded, the narcissistic injury sets up a natural do you love me, need me, want me? need for approval which is the perfect setup for the starving-artist-someone-please-come-rescue-me syndrome. How do I know? Cause I have it too. The difference is recognizing it, owning it and not falling prey to its deception. It's the process of reclaiming your power and renouncing victim-hood working on the inner dialogue and doing the work, learning how to center yourself and staying at cause for your universe. Once you realize that regardless of circumstances past, that in current reality, the ball is in your court entirely, you start to free yourself from the prison of the past. Once you accept the past and forgive it, you can get on the road to helping yourself and eventually winning your dream life. How do I know? Cause I did-the-work-and-made-a-successful-life I've been right where you are and I made it! Here's my: 2013 Soul-based, Free + Independently Wealthy Music Artist Mindset Checklist I take full responsibility for the creation of my world. No one or nothing is to blame for the contents of my life but me. Wherever I am on the Evolutionary Line of my career is absolutely perfect and essential for me to grow to the next level. I embrace exactly where I am so I can keep moving forward. I know that sometimes I am limited in what I believe to be possible for my life and music. I ask that those limits grow and expand beyond where I can imagine right now, every day. I also take full responsibility for the way that I see things. It is up to me to grow and change to fit who I want to become. It's not up to anyone else but me. I seek out opportunities to grow and improve my mindset. I realize that sometimes circumstances outside of my control seem to set me back, but I will accept that life has curve balls that force me to grow. Stress is a sign that I am growing. My success is completely dependent upon the way that I think and perceive. I can only perceive what I already have inside of me. I ask that my consciousness expand to encompass elevated ways of thinking and perceiving so that I can attract the life I desire. I am committed to growing and becoming a better person, musician, and someone who contributes to others. I am dedicated to the evolution of myself and our beautiful planet in the larger universe. I am capable of all that I desire let it start today. Print and post these on your bulletin board or wall. Make a note to uplevel your mindset with these new thought patterns or as Gabrielle Bernstein would say your Miracle Mindset. You are the captain of your future course correct every day until it becomes habit to think with a miracle mindset. Here's to a mind-blowing 2013!! ©2013 Cari Cole, Vocal Mag, Inc. All Rights Reserved. View full articles
  18. My microphone is having some troubles today but I decided to this doors cover anyway.  Might do some tweaks later but here it is: http://picosong.com/LuR5/