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  1. Please go visit my channel and view a few videos .pleassse Watch "Payton Sells Music" on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/user/sellsh
  2. Please go visit my channel and view a few videos. https://www.youtube.com/user/sellsh
  3. Please go and visited my channel and view some videos www.paytonsellsmusic.com
  4. European company JZ Microphones is amongst many manufacturers that offer a modern take on vintage sound. Their Vintage 11 (V11) is said to produce very smooth sounding top end, and in theory, should be very good for voice-over work. But the concept of “modern vintage” still sounds a bit vague and lacking explanation to some. Needless to say, we got our hands on one of these mics to see what it does. When it comes to striking visual design characteristic of JZ Microphones, the V11 is no exception. This thing looks like it belongs in the interior of an expensive luxury car, perhaps as an ashtray or a compartment for your diamond encrusted smartphone. A modern take on a vintage sound The V11 is a high-performance cardioid condenser microphone with a one-inch gold sputtered capsule (JZ Microphones patented GDC capsule making technology). JZ Microphones claims that while the microphone is quite versatile it works best on acoustic guitar, vocals, and wind instruments. The frequency graph of V11 shows a noticeable bump in the lower end and suggests it is designed to deliver smooth, rich, and warm sounds. The V11 has a large diaphragm 27 mm (1,06") capsule, extra low self-noise level (6,5 dB (A)) maximum sound pressure level (SPL) of 134,5 dB, class-A discrete electronics, and gold-plated output contacts. It comes with an external specially designed shock-mount and, just like all other mics that JZ Microphones produces, is handcrafted. Noticeably above the similarly priced competition Opinions about microphones are subjective, but it has to be mentioned that V11 has caught the attention of award-winning producer Rafa Sardina (Lady Gaga, Beyoncé, Stevie Wonder). Sardina has repeatedly stated that he loves many JZ Microphones products and judging from the interviews, the V11 is one of his favorites. We tested it on both male and female singers, trying out a number of singing styles and settings.6 Other “Vintage” series mics (V47, V67) are supposedly made to bring back the sound of all time classics but with the V11 (11 stands for 2011 – the year in which the mic was launched) the company’s founder and designer Juris Zarins hoped to create a microphone that would give you a vintage vibe, but with quite a bit of modern mic-making tradition present in design and during production. The sound, however, shows why JZ Microphones is confident enough to call it the “next classic” on more than one occasion. It proved to be a true gem when it came to spoken word performances. This microphone doesn’t look the part, but it is indeed an excellent tool for radio and performs exceptionally well as a voiceover microphone. Minimal to no EQ intervention is needed, in my opinion. When it comes to singing, it is quite warm yet does not lose clarity. Also, if the bass lift is not welcome at all, you can deal with it easily. The built-in shock-mount is very simple, easy to use, and actually works. The V11’s price tag makes it fair to compare it to all other work-horses that are used for spoken word and broadcasting, and the V11 stands out with a more refined, classy sound. You can just feel that it wasn’t designed as a budget microphone meant to overwhelm the market. They’ve obviously put serious thought into it. I can’t find any problems with construction or sound. I’m going to guess that the reason for this is that the company mainly produces expensive “premium” class microphones and hasn’t really optimized the V11’s production to fit the mid-range price tag. I am pretty sure that most if not all of the high-grade components they use for their most expensive mics are in the V11 as well. After all, are there many other mid-priced microphones that have impressed the likes of Rafa Sardina? In conclusion All in all, what strikes me is the big picture. From what’s written in brochures, the big claims and peculiar marketing strategy might make some buyers confused. I’m still not sure why the whole “modern yet vintage” concept was chosen. In reality, it is simply a very good, very well built, warm-sounding studio microphone with an attractive price tag (and from what I can see, they have generous discounts very often). Someone who is operating on a budget looking for that hi-end studio sound should consider the V11. Accomplished pros have no reason to shy away from it, too. Granted, it is not made to compete with and function like more expensive studio classics, but it is so much more (I can’t stress this enough) than the price tag suggests. Find out more about JZ Microphones products.
  5. For about ten years, a European company called JZ Microphones has made its flagship Black Hole 2 (BH2) studio microphone, supposedly a versatile, visually stunning, and beautifully sounding mic that “easily finds its place among celebrated all-time classics”. It seems that up until now critics have showered this piece of technology with one favorable review after another (to the point where it almost gets a bit ridiculous), so we thought we’d give it a try and see if it really deserves such generosity. The looks JZ Microphones present their BH2 as a “premium”, “high-end” studio microphone, but I’m sure most of you will agree that it does not really look the part. First of all, there’s a hole in the middle. The microphone seems to be rather small and thin, and it doesn’t look like it will fit in a standard spider shock-mount. It leaves you with quite a few questions when you unpack it for the first time, but let’s take a look at some important facts in the brochure. The tech BH2 is a fixed cardioid, large diaphragm 1,06" (27mm) condenser microphone with one large, true electrostatic capsule inside the compact head. Qualities that make it stand out amongst the rest of the herd are JZ Microphones’ patented capsule making technology, Golden Drop Capsule (GDC). Once this technology is implemented, it gives the microphone extra low self-noise level of 7,5 dB (A), discrete class-A electronics, maximum Sound Pressure Level (SPL) of 134,5 dB, and a unique reverberation-canceling shape. It also comes with a specially designed shock-mount and is made by hand. The sound When we decided to test the BH2 we came up with quite an obstacle course: we would use it in all sorts of vocal applications with numerous singers and different types of voices. Upon playing back the very first takes, it became clear how unfair it was to judge this microphone by its looks. The recorded voice sang to us with almost no coloration yet the sound was very flattering (especially for male vocals, as it later became clear) and seemed polished. BH2 presented itself to us in a very primal way. It was like being approached by a large wild animal: you feel its presence instantly. There was no need to analyze the sound or compare it to something else. It was clear right then and there that this mic should not be disregarded. It produces very crisp, detailed voice recordings and would probably do an amazing job with rap vocals. It performs very well both close up and from a considerable distance and captures clear recordings of multiple singers at once. Sure, it gave off U87 and C414 vibes (as often mentioned in reviews), but the amazing part that there’s a very large, dominating chunk of its own personality in there. It delivers the actual sound of whatever it is you’re recording with no apparent noise and features ridiculously low, yet beautiful coloration. This microphone is made for professionals and should be used in high-class studios. To a seasoned recording engineer, it will deliver the pristine sound that is expected of such a specialist. To a singer, it will bring out the very best characteristics of your voice. To someone who is not yet ready, it will tell it to you straight and emphasize your shortcomings. There is no disputing that putting “premium”, “high-end” (or any other fancy English words that the BH2’s European engineers can think of) on to the box of this microphone is completely justified. Although the unusual shape and origins of this microphone can leave you perplexed at first, it soon becomes clear that back in 2007 when JZ Microphones created the BH2, they came up with a whole new design for technology that recently celebrated its 100th birthday. Find out more about JZ Microphones products.
  6. The Carbonphone by Placid Audio is a very unique microphone for anyone who is interested in experimenting with sound. Its military grade carbon granule element captures sound and creates a "lofi" sound that is naturally distorted. Creating sounds similar to scratchy vinyl or an old military radio, this microphone is perfect for anyone looking to recreate a more vintage tone or anyone looking to create something new altogether. Included with the microphone is the Tone Box which provides the current which is needed to power the microphone. While the microphone can be powered by any standard 9 volt power supply, the Tone Box can also shape the sound through a variable five position filter circuit. Each selection on the control knob offers a different frequency response, allowing the Carbonphone to be used on a broad range instruments and for various applications. Because the sound of Carbonphone has a character unlike many other traditional mics, it makes a great addition to any recording enthusiast’s arsenal of microphones. It can be used as an all out obvious ‘effect’ on it’s own or it can be paired with other traditional microphones for infinite blending possibilities. The Carbonphone is a perfect microphone for any person looking to update their studio with new sounds but it is also usable for live performances and with its high durability and great resistance to high pressure sound levels. FEATURES Military grade carbon granule capsule Fully balanced output Quality Hammond output transformer Rugged copper housing and components Powered 5 position variable filter Tone Box Tone Box doubles as a phantom power source Tone Box can be used with other microphones 9 volt power supply for Tone Box High quality Nuetrik 3 pin XLR connectors Handcrafted in the U.S.A Lifetime operational warranty Adjustable aircraft aluminum mounting bracket to fit North American style stands (will fit European style stands with common threaded adapter) SPECS Type: Carbon Polar Pattern: Cardioid Frequency Response: 100Hz ­- 10kHz Impedance: 600 ohms Output: 120 +/­ 2dB SPL @ 1 kHz Mic Dimensions: 1.75 x 5.5 inches Tone Box Dimensions: 5.25 x 4.25 x 2.25 inches Mic Weight: 1 lbs. Tone Box Weight 0.70 lbs. *The Modern Vocalist World is brought to you by The Vocalist Studio, course and training for singers.
  7. The Chantelle Microphone by Ear Trumpet Labs is created to be the best live vocal microphone, bringing the clarity and warmth of a large diaphragm capsule to a low-profile body. In addition to a smooth high end with no harsh tones and an upper-midrange emphasis, included is also a full foam pop filter for even greater sound control.With exceptional feedback rejection, the can be used on even the loudest of stages.The microphone comes specifically tuned to handle any stage and still provide excellent feedback rejection. Chosen by performers in diverse genres, from R&B (Andra Day) to indie folk (Rachel Sermanni) to roots (Dustbowl Revival), Chantelle has a beautiful copper body and distinctive aesthetic that will inspire singers to give their best performance. Chantelle is an end-address large-diaphragm condenser with a flexible pivoting body, excellent for vocals live, in studio, and in videos. This microphone is perfect for any vocalist wanting a diverse sound with a great amount of control over feedback and tone. With a great design and a very slick aesthetic, this microphone is sure to be a great addition for any singer's arsenal. FEATURES Hand-made microphone with unique appearance Side or end address, using pivoting bracket Capsule and electronics tuned for close vocal use on the loudest of stages with excellent feedback rejection Internal shock dampers for minimal handling noise Integral silk and mesh pop filter, for effective control of plosives without loss of clarity Transformerless FET fully balanced electronics Highest quality hand-wired electronic components - film caps, precision resistors, hand tested and matched transistors, with component values tuned for the individual circuit. TECHNICAL SPECS: Transducer Type: Condenser, large (26 mm) diaphragm Polar Pattern: Cardioid Frequency Response: 20 - 15K hz (-3dB) Sensitivity: -49dB (4 mV/Pa) Output Impedance: <50 Ohm Noise Level(A-weighted): <17 dBA Power Requirement: +48V phantom power Weight: 1 lb (4 lbs cased) Dimensions: 8” x 2” x 2”; head is 2” in diameter Sku: ETL-CHANTELLE Hear The Chantelle *The Modern Vocalist World is brought to you by The Vocalist Studio, course and training for singers.
  8. We're working with one of the best independent UK Dance labels and currently looking for a vocalist for an exciting new release. We need a singer with a vocal tone very similar to Marvin Gaye to record a topline on a dance track. You must either be able to travel to London to record or have access to recording equipment to record the vocals.Once accepted through to the workspace we'll request you to record a short vocal demo which we will submit to our client for them to make the final decision. If you are then chosen for this project, we'll provide you with the full brief for you to be able to record the topline. The budget is £250/£300 for recording the vocal topline. See http://www.themodernvocalistworld.com/forum/15-seeking-vocalist-vocalist-available/
  9. Lead Vocals

    The Mystery behind Key Change

    For the pipe organ an open valve will trigger the sound of the pipe. The key of a song tells us which valves we can open safely to stay in harmony. Singers have a comfort zone All singers have a comfort zone, a range of notes that sound best and can be performed effortless. Despite of the ability to expand the vocal range through training, every singer has an individual physical quality which is responsible for the position of the comfort zone within the vocal spectrum. We may not consciously observe this, but the habit of speaking is already giving us a clue about this range. In classic musical education we classify this range by defining voice types, though this method is mostly a helpful convergence to reality. For the singer it is therefore essential to spend some effort on song choice, especially to ensure that a song lies within his or her vocal abilities. Of course that is not the only consideration during song choice, and if you are interested we invite you to read our article "Improve Your Song Choice" to find out more. Another possibility is to simply change the range of notes to be performed by changing the key of the song. The original key Every song was written in an original key. The key we know for any of these songs could be the one it was written in, or it could be the key used when the recording we know was produced. We still refer to it as original key. Original keys are usually relatively easy to access. They may be documented in sheet music, or available in databases, per example for DJ's that research harmonic mixing, among other sources. It also can be determined by examining the chords and notes of the song. It is to mention that a key can and oftentimes does change within a song. The key a song is regarded to be in is most often starting in the key and at one point returning to the same key before the end. Find out what exactly a key is, and how keys are transitioned in our article "Musical Keys and the Key Change". Here is an example. A song written or performed in a G Major key is based on the tonic note of G, and includes a system of notes defined by the major scale that is also based on the tonic note. The chord progressions used in the song will to a great extent lie within the scale, with the tonic chord being the foundation of those progressions. What happens between the use of G Major may be harmonic movement and/or modulation. Lead Vocals and original keys Here at Lead Vocals we consider our practice section as a tool to quickly review and learn the melody, timing, phrasing, and mood of a performance. In addition we think that the tool enables vocalists to study other artists by paying close attention to ingredients like dialect and pronunciation in language, the choice of placing words or phrases within rhythm and beats, any habits, and style and musical influences. Unlike other existing tools like per example some karaoke platforms we do not offer access to the same performance in multiple keys. But just recently we have introduced additional helpful information about many of the songs available here within the tagging system. At present we offer selection by tonic pitch, musical key, and scale information which can be helpful to explore new music. We think that from an educational point of view the choice of the tonic pitch is most interesting, because many melodies in songs may start or end with the tonic note. If a vocalist can deliver that note in a rich, strong, and compelling tonal quality that makes the audience want to hear more, then the song choice by tonic pitch may lead to the discovery of suitable songs for the singer. You may give this a try by selecting a song to practice by tonic pitch. Continue solving the mystery Find out why vocalists change the key of a song and how they approach the key change. In an attempt to solve the mystery behind the musical key we define what a key is, and explain the background of harmonic movement, chord progressions, and modulation. We also include the consideration of emotional characteristics for all keys based on the major and minor scale, that may play an additional role in the selection process for the vocalist. Further we're taking a brief look at common practice in recording sessions. Continue reading about this topic in our article "Musical Keys and the Key Change" at http://www.leadvocals.ca/background/musical-keys-and-the-key-change Additional Information Our Practice Section at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/practice Try to Sing Along at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/lyrics/songs What is Lead Vocals? Lead Vocals is a free of charge online resource for aspiring vocalists, who are learning the craft of singing and who practice their art by singing along to playback recordings and to other selected musical performances on video. All recordings are hand selected and the lyrics are spot on matching to the performance of the lead vocalist. The tool allows for quick access to practice specific parts within a song. We especially took care in avoiding clutter and disruptive advertising. Follow us on Social Media https://facebook.com/leadvocals.ca https://plus.google.com/+LeadvocalsCa https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadvocals https://www.twitter.com/leadvocalsca https://www.youtube.com/LeadvocalsCa
  10. An example for the use of music is its distribution to people through a sound system. If a singer, instrumentalist or a band wants to record, use, or perform music that is owned or controlled by somebody else, it is very likely that a license has to be obtained to do this on legal ground. Find out what kind of licenses control the use and recreation of music compositions, audio recordings, the use of music in public, the reproduction of sheet music, and the performance of theatrical productions. At Lead Vocals we also offer links and services to help you obtaining licenses for cover songs. The purpose of licensing The purpose of music licensing is to make sure that the people and companies involved in the creation process of music, like per example the composer, the record label, the performing artist, and the publisher will get paid for the work and effort they have put into a piece of music. Allowing somebody to use a piece of music either as a composition, or as a recording, can be understood like a trade between the creator and the licensee. Per example, if an artist is recording a cover song of another artist and is then distributing and selling that song on his or her own album release, he or she must ensure that the original composer of that song gets a share in form of a royalty. A royalty is a sum of money paid to the rights holder for each copy of a work sold, or for each public performance of a work. In common practice such royalties are most often calculated and collected in advance during the phase of producing the copies. Types of music licenses It is to mention that we in general distinguish between different kinds of uses for music, its recordings, and its production. Here is an overview with examples for the most common types of music licenses: In general a license is necessary when the task is done by someone, who did not create the work. The overview shows a common example, but is in no way a complete reference. If you are interested in reading deeper into the topic please continue reading our article at - http://www.leadvocals.ca/background/music-licensing Additional Information License a Cover Song http://www.leadvocals.ca/resources/license-a-cover-song Our Practice Section at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/practice Try to Sing Along at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/lyrics/songs What is Lead Vocals? Lead Vocals is a free of charge online resource for aspiring vocalists, who are learning the craft of singing and who practice their art by singing along to playback recordings and to other selected musical performances on video. All recordings are hand selected and the lyrics are spot on matching to the performance of the lead vocalist. The tool allows for quick access to practice specific parts within a song. We especially took care in avoiding clutter and disruptive advertising. Follow us on Social Media https://facebook.com/leadvocals.ca https://plus.google.com/+LeadvocalsCa https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadvocals https://www.twitter.com/leadvocalsca https://www.youtube.com/LeadvocalsCa
  11. Version

    0 downloads

    Gary Osborne is the founder and inventor of Lampifier Microphones. Lampifier Microphones feature a unique, build in compression solution that uses light as its medium. Lampifier microphones are great microphones and offer an interesting and unique solution to compression for singers. Gary Osborne www.Lampifier.com

    Free

  12. Version

    0 downloads

    John Gresko is the founder of Direct Sound and inventor of Extreme Isolation Headphones. The best isolation headphones available to singers in the world. John Gresko www.ExtremeHeadphones.com

    Free

  13. This is the full song. I am currently putting this song out on iTunes, Spotify, google play, and every place you can think of. Expect a forum post within the next week or so saying "check me out on the tonight show" ha ha. http://vocaroo.com/i/s1ObRDbNrJpo
  14. I want to record a high-quality song in the studio. I don't want it to sound pretty good or just nice. I want a professional radio-ready, tv ready sound. What do I need to do and how do I do it? Do I just buy recording time and they will do the rest or do I have to buy mixers and masters and all of the fancy people I don't know the names for? What are the steps and how do I start to make a pro recording of a song? I am not worried about how much the recording costs. I am only worried about the quality and the quality alone. Important information I have never done any work in a professional studio as far as I know, I do not know anyone personaly who has made a radio ready recording in a studio I do not have a drum set nor do I know how to play one if I did. Although I have had some experience with drum samples and thought they sounded pretty good at times Bass, Guitar, Vocals, and piano are all instruments That can be played professionally either by my self or others I know.
  15. Recording plugins are some of the most essential and fun additions for any home recording. The quality and variety of recording plugins available today is simply miraculous. With the right choice of plugins, and a little bit of skill at home recording, an experienced home recording engineer can produce recordings that sound very professional! Plugins are not just for vocal effects. They are also available to simulate vintage preamps, compressors and even recording consoles like the famed SSL console system. In the world of plugins for digital audio work stations, (DAWs), there is no company that does a better job then waves. Visit www.waves.com and learn more about how you can make your home recordings sound professional! TOP RECOMMENDED WAVES PLUGINS FOR RECORDING VOCALS! CLICK HERE TO VISIT WAVES RECOMMENDED VOCAL PLUGINS AT WAVES: CLA VOCALS * JJP VOCALS * EDDIE KRAMER VOCAL CHANNEL MASARATI VX1 * BUTCH VIG VOCALS * VOCAL RIDER * HR REVERB HR ECHO REAL ADT APHEX VINTAGE AURAL EXCITER WAVES TUNE WAVES TUNE LT DOUBLER * DEBREATH DeEsser VITAMIN * RENAISSANCE VOX THE KING'S MICROPHONES AND A LOT MORE...! * Honorable Mentions... essential! Other Vocal Gear Required for a Complete Home Recording Include The Following Recommendations: A digital Audio Workstation - DAWs: LogicProX, Reaper, ProTools. A digital audio interface: We recommend the Scarlett digital audio interfaces from focusrite. A recording, condenser microphone: RODE Microphones: NT1, K2 Pearlman Microphones See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. Headphones: Extreme Isolation x-29s. See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. A Reflextion Fliter: SE Electronics Reflexion Filter Pro Ambience. A Pop Filter: See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions.
  16. TMV World Team

    RODE NT - USB Microphone Review

    In my quest for the perfect recording setup, I was pleased to discover an audio recording solution that minimizes the amount of gear I require to produce my YouTube content. I create educational videos on an almost daily basis and having a simple and effective audio recording setup is essential to my workflow. That's why I'm pleased to have discovered the RODE NT-USB microphone. The NT-USB is a Condenser Microphone which means that it's capable of recording the human voice with far clearer quality compared to something like a lavalier or headset mic which contain a Dynamic Microphone.) There's nothing worse than listening to poor quality voice narration, so I'm a big fan of using a condenser for all of my videos. This microphone can be purchased at The Vocal Gear Store. To connect a condenser microphone to a computer requires a USB or Firewire audio interface or a soundcard that can receive an XLR microphone cable. Typically, the interface will also need to support Phantom Power for a condenser microphone to work properly. In my previous recording setup, I was using an M-Audio Firewire Audio Interface connected to an AudioTechnica AT2020 Condenser Mic. While this setup certainly does the trick, it has a lot of cables and individual parts. This Summer, I found myself doing a lot of recording outside my studio. In an attempt to keep my gear to a minimum, I tried recording ambient audio with my camera microphones. To my disappointment, all I got was a lot of noise from wind and not much ambient audio. My goal for my outdoor videos is to paint a landscape, but also to capture nature sounds like birds and leaves rustling. It was apparent that if I wanted to get a good audio recording outdoors, I would need to start bringing a condenser mic with me on my recording sessions. On each trip, I would have to carry my drawing tablet, easel, tripods, cameras, supplies and sometimes a camping chair. I didn't want the burden of transporting, assembling and disassembling a Firewire interface, so I was relieved to discover the RODE NT-USB which doesn't require an audio interface. It simply plugs in and is powered through USB. As far as the specs, it's a studio-quality microphone which means that you can use it not only for voice narration and podcasts, but also for recording vocals and instruments. As with most condenser mics, the polar pattern is Cardioid. The NT-USB's frequency range is 20Hz ~ 20kHz so it going to do a marvelous job of capturing a natural sounding human voice with clarity. It's dynamic range is 96dB and its Max SPL is 110dB. As I mentioned before, it's powered by USB 5V DC and its weight is 520g, which is a little on the heavy side, but not uncommon for a condenser microphone. The NT-USB is very well built using high quality electronic components. Its metal case feels rugged, but as with all condenser mics, their internal parts are delicate, so I recommend taking caution with this type of mic. You certainly can't toss it around like you would a handheld Dynamic mic. The kind you typically see performers singing into. Aside from a computer and recording software like Garageband, the NT-USB comes with everything you need to setup and record. It even works with the iPad as long as you have the USB Camera Connection Kit. Included in the box are a tabletop tripod microphone stand, a 20” long USB cable and a Pop Shield. I appreciate the inclusion of these accessories because having a stand eliminates the need fo r a mic stand which takes up a lot of space. The long USB cable reaches pretty far as USB cables go. And the Pop Shield is especially useful for protecting your recordings from being ruined by plosives which are the loud pop sounds you get when you accidentally breathe too hard on the microphone. Condenser mics are particularly sensitive to plosives, so a Pop Shield is essential. I must admit, everything is so nice and compact once you get it assembled. It's super portable and it takes a lot of the hassle out o f setting up to record audio. Now let's talk about some of the pros and cons of the NT-USB. I don't have much that's negative to say about the NT-USB so I'll start there. While RODE states that the NT-USB is pre-set to an optimal recording gain, I have to disagree. Not all recording setups are the same and in my studio, there is some fan noise from my computer which means I need to set my gain lower to get a good recording. The NT-USB does not have a volume gain knob, so I have to set the recording gain by opening the recording properties on my computer and setting the levels there. While that does work, it's kind of a hassle compared to just turning a knob. Why this knob was left out, I don't know, but I sure do wish it were there. As far as the pros, there are several. First, there is a handy on-board headphone monitoring feature which allows you to adjust the balance between your voice and the background audio while recording. What this means is that while singing or narrating, you can make the background music louder or quieter to make it easier to hear your own voice in the mix. As I mentioned earlier, the NT-USB is USB powered, so it only requires a USB cable to connect to your computer and record audio. No preamp, audio input box, phantom power or XLR cable required. Less gear means less time setting up to record and I like that. So if you're a YouTuber, Vlogger, Podcaster or Vocal Artist who is in the market for a great all-in-one recording device that's ultra compact and portable, but doesn't compromise on voice quality, the RODE NT-USB is a great option for you. If you'd like to learn more about the RODE NT-USB please visit RODE's website at www.rodemic.com. - - - - - - - - - - - - - If you want to be part of the world's largest online community for singing where great professionalists will review your singing, don't miss the chance and use the 50% Discount Code for "Review my singing" Forum: TMVWorld50
  17. In my quest for the perfect recording setup, I was pleased to discover an audio recording solution that minimizes the amount of gear I require to produce my YouTube content. I create educational videos on an almost daily basis and having a simple and effective audio recording setup is essential to my workflow. That's why I'm pleased to have discovered the RODE NT-USB microphone. The NT-USB is a Condenser Microphone which means that it's capable of recording the human voice with far clearer quality compared to something like a lavalier or headset mic which contain a Dynamic Microphone.) There's nothing worse than listening to poor quality voice narration, so I'm a big fan of using a condenser for all of my videos. This microphone can be purchased at The Vocal Gear Store. To connect a condenser microphone to a computer requires a USB or Firewire audio interface or a soundcard that can receive an XLR microphone cable. Typically, the interface will also need to support Phantom Power for a condenser microphone to work properly. In my previous recording setup, I was using an M-Audio Firewire Audio Interface connected to an AudioTechnica AT2020 Condenser Mic. While this setup certainly does the trick, it has a lot of cables and individual parts. This Summer, I found myself doing a lot of recording outside my studio. In an attempt to keep my gear to a minimum, I tried recording ambient audio with my camera microphones. To my disappointment, all I got was a lot of noise from wind and not much ambient audio. My goal for my outdoor videos is to paint a landscape, but also to capture nature sounds like birds and leaves rustling. It was apparent that if I wanted to get a good audio recording outdoors, I would need to start bringing a condenser mic with me on my recording sessions. On each trip, I would have to carry my drawing tablet, easel, tripods, cameras, supplies and sometimes a camping chair. I didn't want the burden of transporting, assembling and disassembling a Firewire interface, so I was relieved to discover the RODE NT-USB which doesn't require an audio interface. It simply plugs in and is powered through USB. As far as the specs, it's a studio-quality microphone which means that you can use it not only for voice narration and podcasts, but also for recording vocals and instruments. As with most condenser mics, the polar pattern is Cardioid. The NT-USB's frequency range is 20Hz ~ 20kHz so it going to do a marvelous job of capturing a natural sounding human voice with clarity. It's dynamic range is 96dB and its Max SPL is 110dB. As I mentioned before, it's powered by USB 5V DC and its weight is 520g, which is a little on the heavy side, but not uncommon for a condenser microphone. The NT-USB is very well built using high quality electronic components. Its metal case feels rugged, but as with all condenser mics, their internal parts are delicate, so I recommend taking caution with this type of mic. You certainly can't toss it around like you would a handheld Dynamic mic. The kind you typically see performers singing into. Aside from a computer and recording software like Garageband, the NT-USB comes with everything you need to setup and record. It even works with the iPad as long as you have the USB Camera Connection Kit. Included in the box are a tabletop tripod microphone stand, a 20” long USB cable and a Pop Shield. I appreciate the inclusion of these accessories because having a stand eliminates the need fo r a mic stand which takes up a lot of space. The long USB cable reaches pretty far as USB cables go. And the Pop Shield is especially useful for protecting your recordings from being ruined by plosives which are the loud pop sounds you get when you accidentally breathe too hard on the microphone. Condenser mics are particularly sensitive to plosives, so a Pop Shield is essential. I must admit, everything is so nice and compact once you get it assembled. It's super portable and it takes a lot of the hassle out o f setting up to record audio. Now let's talk about some of the pros and cons of the NT-USB. I don't have much that's negative to say about the NT-USB so I'll start there. While RODE states that the NT-USB is pre-set to an optimal recording gain, I have to disagree. Not all recording setups are the same and in my studio, there is some fan noise from my computer which means I need to set my gain lower to get a good recording. The NT-USB does not have a volume gain knob, so I have to set the recording gain by opening the recording properties on my computer and setting the levels there. While that does work, it's kind of a hassle compared to just turning a knob. Why this knob was left out, I don't know, but I sure do wish it were there. As far as the pros, there are several. First, there is a handy on-board headphone monitoring feature which allows you to adjust the balance between your voice and the background audio while recording. What this means is that while singing or narrating, you can make the background music louder or quieter to make it easier to hear your own voice in the mix. As I mentioned earlier, the NT-USB is USB powered, so it only requires a USB cable to connect to your computer and record audio. No preamp, audio input box, phantom power or XLR cable required. Less gear means less time setting up to record and I like that. So if you're a YouTuber, Vlogger, Podcaster or Vocal Artist who is in the market for a great all-in-one recording device that's ultra compact and portable, but doesn't compromise on voice quality, the RODE NT-USB is a great option for you. If you'd like to learn more about the RODE NT-USB please visit RODE's website at www.rodemic.com. - - - - - - - - - - - - - If you want to be part of the world's largest online community for singing where great professionalists will review your singing, don't miss the chance and use the 50% Discount Code for "Review my singing" Forum: TMVWorld50 View full articles
  18. Recording plugins are some of the most essential and fun additions for any home recording. The quality and variety of recording plugins available today is simply miraculous. With the right choice of plugins, and a little bit of skill at home recording, an experienced home recording engineer can produce recordings that sound very professional! Plugins are not just for vocal effects. They are also available to simulate vintage preamps, compressors and even recording consoles like the famed SSL console system. In the world of plugins for digital audio work stations, (DAWs), there is no company that does a better job then waves. Visit www.waves.com and learn more about how you can make your home recordings sound professional! Recording plugins are some of the most essential and fun additions for any home recording. The quality and variety of recording plugins available today is simply miraculous. With the right choice of plugins, and a little bit of skill at home recording, an experienced home recording engineer can produce recordings that sound very professional! Plugins are not just for vocal effects. They are also available to simulate vintage preamps, compressors and even recording consoles like the famed SSL console system. In the world of plugins for digital audio work stations, (DAWs), there is no company that does a better job then waves. Visit www.waves.com and learn more about how you can make your home recordings sound professional! TOP RECOMMENDED WAVES PLUGINS FOR RECORDING VOCALS! CLICK HERE TO VISIT WAVES RECOMMENDED VOCAL PLUGINS AT WAVES: CLA VOCALS * JJP VOCALS * EDDIE KRAMER VOCAL CHANNEL MASARATI VX1 * BUTCH VIG VOCALS * VOCAL RIDER * HR REVERB HR ECHO REAL ADT APHEX VINTAGE AURAL EXCITER WAVES TUNE WAVES TUNE LT DOUBLER * DEBREATH DeEsser VITAMIN * RENAISSANCE VOX THE KING'S MICROPHONES AND A LOT MORE...! * Honorable Mentions... essential! Other Vocal Gear Required for a Complete Home Recording Include The Following Recommendations: A digital Audio Workstation - DAWs: LogicProX, Reaper, ProTools. A digital audio interface: We recommend the Scarlett digital audio interfaces from focusrite. A recording, condenser microphone: RODE Microphones: NT1, K2 Pearlman Microphones See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. Headphones: Extreme Isolation x-29s. See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. A Reflextion Fliter: SE Electronics Reflexion Filter Pro Ambience. A Pop Filter: See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. View full articles
  19. Hi, I am working with a pretty talented young man that can sing reasonably well, I mean, he can sing his own songs well. We were in the studio over the weekend working on a song he did not write and it was one of the worst sessions I have ever had. His tempo was off, pitch was off, he was a totally different person than I worked with before. After several agonizing hours I decided to take a break. We was embarrassed and I was frustrated. I left the track playing in the back ground and he started singing one of his songs. It was perfect. Thinking he found his mojo I immediately jump back on the boards and told him to sing the verse to the other song ............ terrible! I know he wasn't faking it because there was too much money at stake. But he just couldn't get it. I have never seen anything like this before. I even had him try singing one sentence at a time hoping I could piece something together, and still nothing. Has anyone ever experienced this? If so, How did you correct it? At the end of the session I had him sing the song he wrote and it was incredible. The songs weren't that much different from each other. When he left I was stumped! Any suggestions?
  20. Would love to hear thoughts here from folks. I have always assumed that live singing is far more difficult than studio. You get only one attempt to sing it right. On the other hand, someone(maybe it was Ronws) here once said that in live singing, you mistakes get buried in the noise whereas studio singing I feel the mistakes get amplified.. I feel that somehow when I sing live, I have a decent technique, I can make the song sound good singing in one take.. Same thing in studio is so much difficult.. Especially when singing on to a karaoke track.. Every single mistake gets amplified.. Am I alone here.. Would love to hear from folks here..
  21. Singing is one of the most important means of communication that we are blessed to experience. It is the means by which we express our innermost thoughts and feelings in a language shared by the whole world. We sing songs as worship...as symbols of patriotism...as words to inspire change...to amuse...to romance....to uplift. Often, it is forgotten how integral singing is to our existence. When at play, children seem to almost instinctively sing as part of their games. These same young voices are instruments capable of producing a wide array of tones and timbres. In order to access this wide range of sounds, though, the sounds produced at play are not enough. Proper training in healthy vocal production is needed. Recently, I have been asked quite a bit about the appropriate age to begin voice lessons for children. Parents realize that their kids have either an overwhelming enthusiasm for singing or some substantial native talent that they want to properly nurture. They just wonder if formal lessons are safe for the youngster to undertake and worth the financial investment. First of all, I stress that the most important issue with kids is their attention span and not the perceived talent level. I've had some clearly gifted 7 year olds come in but they did not have the focus and maturity that is needed. Once that is explained, I relay that I believe lessons can successfully begin at age 8. I have trained a couple of 7 year olds, though, because they had the requisite focus, attention span, and teachability in addition to natural musical instincts. As long as the training is based in healthy technical habits and applied correctly to songs, there are no inherent dangers. Many people wonder what young singers can actually learn in private voice lessons. Some have believed that their physically immature instruments cannot acquire any real technical skills until their voices fully develop at puberty. But I am one of many who work with kids on a regular basis who believe that these voices can develop quite a lot of facility if guided correctly. We must remember that singing is an intricate psychomotor skill, not so different from the learning of piano, dance, or athletic moves. It's all about the systematic training of correct muscle memory which builds healthy technique that will strengthen and protect the voice. And if the goal of vocal study is establishment of good vocal habits that will carry over into adulthood, vocal technique has to be of primary importance! Of course, this must be balanced with singing good songs, but it will be difficult to expand repertoire if the instrument is limited in the sounds it can produce. The very same technical issues that need to be taught to adult singers need to be taught to kids. The building of tone production practices is essential. Child singers need to develop the ability to produce tones without undue tension and restriction. They must be taught proper breathing techniques and good body posture and alignment. Range extension is still important for kids, even though it must be applied relative to their still-growing voices. Many of the exercises that I use with my adult clients are used in the sessions with my youngsters, though sometimes with modifications. I also make sure that I introduce them to correct terminology concerning how the voice is put together and how it works. They learn about head and chest voice, the larynx, vocal folds, diaphragm, and resonance. They need to start learning a singer's vocabulary from the start of their study. We are seeing some fine examples of superstar singers who have become elite vocal athletes because of some fantastic vocal training starting at a young age- Beyonce Knowles, Kelly Rowland, Adam Lambert among others. It is a worthwhile investment to begin lessons with a child who has the love for singing coupled with a sense of focus and discipline. The teacher must have a great knowledge of vocal pedagogy and a personality that can provide a safe, nurturing environment for the young singer to embark on this great journey of singing study.
  22. Singing is one of the most important means of communication that we are blessed to experience. It is the means by which we express our innermost thoughts and feelings in a language shared by the whole world. We sing songs as worship...as symbols of patriotism...as words to inspire change...to amuse...to romance....to uplift. Often, it is forgotten how integral singing is to our existence. When at play, children seem to almost instinctively sing as part of their games. These same young voices are instruments capable of producing a wide array of tones and timbres. In order to access this wide range of sounds, though, the sounds produced at play are not enough. Proper training in healthy vocal production is needed. Recently, I have been asked quite a bit about the appropriate age to begin voice lessons for children. Parents realize that their kids have either an overwhelming enthusiasm for singing or some substantial native talent that they want to properly nurture. They just wonder if formal lessons are safe for the youngster to undertake and worth the financial investment. First of all, I stress that the most important issue with kids is their attention span and not the perceived talent level. I've had some clearly gifted 7 year olds come in but they did not have the focus and maturity that is needed. Once that is explained, I relay that I believe lessons can successfully begin at age 8. I have trained a couple of 7 year olds, though, because they had the requisite focus, attention span, and teachability in addition to natural musical instincts. As long as the training is based in healthy technical habits and applied correctly to songs, there are no inherent dangers. Many people wonder what young singers can actually learn in private voice lessons. Some have believed that their physically immature instruments cannot acquire any real technical skills until their voices fully develop at puberty. But I am one of many who work with kids on a regular basis who believe that these voices can develop quite a lot of facility if guided correctly. We must remember that singing is an intricate psychomotor skill, not so different from the learning of piano, dance, or athletic moves. It's all about the systematic training of correct muscle memory which builds healthy technique that will strengthen and protect the voice. And if the goal of vocal study is establishment of good vocal habits that will carry over into adulthood, vocal technique has to be of primary importance! Of course, this must be balanced with singing good songs, but it will be difficult to expand repertoire if the instrument is limited in the sounds it can produce. The very same technical issues that need to be taught to adult singers need to be taught to kids. The building of tone production practices is essential. Child singers need to develop the ability to produce tones without undue tension and restriction. They must be taught proper breathing techniques and good body posture and alignment. Range extension is still important for kids, even though it must be applied relative to their still-growing voices. Many of the exercises that I use with my adult clients are used in the sessions with my youngsters, though sometimes with modifications. I also make sure that I introduce them to correct terminology concerning how the voice is put together and how it works. They learn about head and chest voice, the larynx, vocal folds, diaphragm, and resonance. They need to start learning a singer's vocabulary from the start of their study. We are seeing some fine examples of superstar singers who have become elite vocal athletes because of some fantastic vocal training starting at a young age- Beyonce Knowles, Kelly Rowland, Adam Lambert among others. It is a worthwhile investment to begin lessons with a child who has the love for singing coupled with a sense of focus and discipline. The teacher must have a great knowledge of vocal pedagogy and a personality that can provide a safe, nurturing environment for the young singer to embark on this great journey of singing study. View full articles