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Found 23 results

  1. This is my tribute to Chester Bennington. Chester was the idol of mine I looked up to. As far back as I can remember, My best friendCollin and I always jammed to LP. Let me know what you think of this. Thank you. Rest in Peace Chester.
  2. https://www.smule.com/recording/abba-dancing-queen/1088277799_1226555039/ensembles Confidence issues and weak attack on lower register/ stronger upper register? Advice please folks?
  3. Singing 10 vowels to different notes

    So after I sang to someone I was told I needed to work on my oh and ow vowels as they are causing my tone to accidentally darken So I have done what was recommended but decided to sing 10 different vowels of ee, ih, eh, a, ah, aw, uh, oh, ou, oo, instead of singing the recommended oh and ow And sang them to the pitch of this piano/ organ app which I recorded the notes from this link http://www.kongregate.com/games/buttonbass1/player-organ At the bottom of the page is an image of the piano. And inside the red lines of that piano are the notes I have sang I started at middle C (presuming middle C is the middle key in the piano) and worked my way up a note and down a notes at a time I will do more notes at a later stage though The links I have listed below are what I have done, the first link of each note is ee-ah and the second link of each note is aw-oo But I have worked hard at this doing each vowel at each note many many times Do you see there is much more work to be done? Thanks 2CIADB A2 (6) https://app.box.com/s/g5bqj3lneub23k550l6tbh1qpmq0u7kv https://app.box.com/s/b4x7zcjlfxa0fdgzbj8t993cflcwz4fd B2 (7) https://app.box.com/s/ncrqoxix0d8rxosv4yez1bnnkl5hc8nq https://app.box.com/s/1tazdpmy7rhwvk1524bmn20a43jrawzc C3 (8) https://app.box.com/s/3yhkqkcf1e56he75rlo7uotg46zoj066 https://app.box.com/s/wg5pmu98skppci031mv3rl7ouyd8i7v6 D3 (9) https://app.box.com/s/r5zp147rezjqvlh5swwriswrv0rtpffq https://app.box.com/s/aazy2p1zt6bgmn2dx3vfqsnao7ukyp66 E3 (10) https://app.box.com/s/uk7gsexxmsrll66wrnoq0k4n0spc7ipq https://app.box.com/s/jxb9fkgxrlz8tzf3718rrx29fikbtqqv F3 (11) https://app.box.com/s/3yf1zm711kyll5loi7i3wg7saiohpthc https://app.box.com/s/sd0jh3spqg45gxawsrz966ljcjd5jdwy G3 (12) https://app.box.com/s/6xemcs9oloq7ticr2upomf8m7vro3zdc https://app.box.com/s/w405xb8qefehqwqc20p3pa79lqom1etr A3 (13) https://app.box.com/s/mzw37jqs27hz6a1hhbtjjlq18v0szwxm https://app.box.com/s/wt6160a2kajbyiux1dlb3dykgfo5ycmh B3 (14) https://app.box.com/s/p0uq7sdmz8vq2b4eu73bz1uqahjdd3iy https://app.box.com/s/w01pxlwf8mwqfq5r3f6zzy8guv0r3ovj C4 (15) middle C https://app.box.com/s/3nqm37nifylqd64em11j5nhys39u8w32 https://app.box.com/s/uxd9f7iop4yy0x7a9g8ciivcochnzr6u D4 (16) https://app.box.com/s/54pvx6u55voctplrmubx728lvl0m5n12 https://app.box.com/s/jbdq4u8fstj66qbmbmoogvsa656oj4s7 E4 (17) https://app.box.com/s/f83l4nxrwj6xhfl2vzbs56crr8i6liyh https://app.box.com/s/qbpprthkz9jmy0h2n3l0p4yv2ybv3m1f F4 (18) https://app.box.com/s/fwq9pv9gszlypmouf5p5r893unya05vc https://app.box.com/s/5dknwrrcoaj8r4xj04qkf0pqzxqfibmp G4 (19) https://app.box.com/s/pgfhdrgnxhdu0ljy5w6fjpmwgk99rhta https://app.box.com/s/g23diog2qwpjri7dekxb810dt2j6wf46 A4 (20) https://app.box.com/s/fu4nk3bzoum3adae7fikme1x3g616088 https://app.box.com/s/utv1igpnm771uvayui196evx9e51fk4x B4 (21) https://app.box.com/s/w4bu0iw6cyopa70cl5jmq4c6bcxw6zj0 https://app.box.com/s/e7ulif4l5hx04g4d6et9khpe7ctiph0t C5 (22) https://app.box.com/s/a4ygldv7e0rgb9oxtvjg4nd58skczyij https://app.box.com/s/2z8b7swe21a2pgaqlgrlx0rjt01mya6r D5 (23) https://app.box.com/s/ad27auu6r3yvbikd2ywl0uji7yzx8yfc https://app.box.com/s/rwyymmc93tlek84ibnw6049d6ce7km12 E5 (24) https://app.box.com/s/19dbuf12hqqix7dqbox0hm9nlv0layij https://app.box.com/s/o8u1jogv9wle5gneuod3enij29kk1cn4
  4. "White Rabbit" Tribute! I am proud to share a performance and production of Jefferson Airplane's classic, "White Rabbit". SaraEllen has been training with TVS for about two years. Excellent job SaraEllen! LOVE the curbing vowel resonance, steady embouchure, and "snappy" glottal attacks on the vowels, apart from the interpretation that captures the nuances we coached and discussed. Sounds great, looks great, a kick ass production and worthy achievement! Coach.
  5. Holy Diver

    Hello! Tried this challenging and legendary song again. I, especially found the C5 phrase "wheel" challenging, more than the equal C5 "seen". Why is that you think? Any suggestions to improve this song? Ok, so the youtube link doesn't work so here is a link to my facebook video instead. I hope this works. https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10153584906741517&id=654441516
  6. working on a chorus for a song. The chorus is in D minor and the highest note in the chorus is C5 So I can SORT of ease into the c5 note but its really shaky. Naturally if its doubled and heavily processed it sounds almost legit lol Here is the doubled/processed vox in the chorus snippet: (btw, be forwarned, there is a flat5 note featured lol) https://clyp.it/ybkczkss Now, here is the BARE vx, no compression, no nothing. This is each half of the doubled chorus put back to back. The first time thru was the first one I sang and it was a little better. The 2nd time thru was a little rounded off https://clyp.it/pjyyq1ke So essentially I am trying to hit a C5 on the "o" in "open" and on the "uh" in "love" Here is me JUST hitting those 2 syllables: https://clyp.it/4opbmxzu And to show the struggle, here is one that cracked: https://clyp.it/wpr4fvas So lets have some good discussion on how these sound as is, how I can best train for them to be WAY better for comparison here is a nice B4 by Joe Lynn Turner, obviously im miles from this but this is sort of a goal to aim at: https://clyp.it/o44er4fj Also any discussion on the mechanical aspect of the cracked note. Physiologically, what broke down there? (and thus, what does the training focus need to be)
  7. In Vocal Science Uk ,Our voice repair specialist give you treatment ,without any surgery . visit us or call to cure you all voice realted problem. Call us at - 416-857-8741 Mail us at- info@vocalscience.com
  8. https://app.box.com/s/vzehmp5d4amt79340nzib8hoqh3l9b8o I did the solo version minus Sarah Brightman and really tried to support the lower notes and the sustained notes towards the end after the key change. Any and all feedback welcome. The lyrics + translation are here - http://lyricstranslate.com/en/time-say-goodbye-con-te-partiro-time-say-goodbye-ill-go-you.html#songtranslation
  9. Hi Folks.. I have put up a few versions of this song earlier which were not too impressive. I am now beginning to get a lot more control on the passagio area, especially with a more "open" sound. I have two areas that I would appreciate feedback 1. Looking at my singing, I seem to be using more horizontal embouchure than vertical. I only very recently started looking at my singing in the mirror. Is there anything wrong in my embouchure. I am looking for dark tones in the upper range. Does a horizontal embouchure produce a "brighter" sound? 2. The second question is with respect to the mix and mic placement. My wife says I sound much better in person than what I am able to get the mix in my recordings to sound. This does not help me at all since we don't hear exactly our voice in the manner we sound to others. What could I be doing wrong? She says I sound very different in my recordings. Is this a function of the average quality of backing track or is it a mix issue? Any pointers would be very helpful. The mic I am using in this a Shure beta 58A. I record in an untreated room.
  10. Hey Rob ! Howzitgoin' ? I'm practicing ( not as much as I would want : Work + daughter and stuff ...) During our lesson, we was reaching an E4 and then came the time to do vowel modifications We went obviously from Eh to a Ah or Uh and you said : Ah is your Trebble knob, Uh is your Bass Knob and said that formants are this : Multiple sound colours at the same time Is that to say that we can have simultaneously Eh+AH+Uh vowels blended together ? or is it just EH+AH or EH+ Uh Simply put : Can we have more than 2 vowels blended together ? If yes, how many of them then ? Question might sound silly, but I was wondering Let me know Thanx
  11. Introduction In the male voice lower and mid ranges, (what has been traditionally called the "chest voice"), the harmonic structure of the sung tone contains many partials - harmonics, which fit nicely into the pattern of resonances for any particular vowel chosen. Throughout this range, the strong, lower harmonics are reinforced by the first vowel resonance corresponding with Formant 1, (F1), midrange harmonics are reinforced by the second vowel resonance from Formant 2 (F2), and higher harmonics are emphasized by the higher "twang" or "singer's" formant resonances. The combination of multiple, powerful low, midrange, and high harmonics present in all vowels is a distinctive characteristic of this section of the male voice. In contrast with this, in the male high range, (what has been traditionally called the 'head voice'), the harmonics produced by the voice are higher in frequency and more widely spaced. Here, few of the harmonics fit into the vowel resonance pattern. For one particular span of notes in the head voice, there is no significant resonance available to amplify the lowest two harmonics produced. To achieve vocal power and consistency of tone in the high voice, the male singer uses what he has available, "twang" (singer's formant) and the resonance from F2 strengthening harmonic 3 or 4, depending on vowel. Between these two resonance strategies is a region of transition, too high for the 'chest voice' strategy, and too low for the F2 alignments of the 'head voice' strategy. This transition region is the passaggio. Acoustics of the rising fundamental Throughout the voice, as the fundamental frequency moves, the alignment of harmonics and resonances for a vowel changes. On an upward-moving scale or leap, the fundamental and all the overtones rise in frequency. Since the harmonics are spaced at multiples of the fundamental, the harmonics also get farther apart, too. For most of the chest voice range, this is not an issue, as the resonance from F1 covers a wide frequency range, and midrange harmonics are close enough together for at least 2 or 3 of them to get some benefit from F2. These conditions apply to all the vowels. However, in an upward pitch pattern, as the voice passes middle C (C-F, depending on voice type) eventually the scale reaches a region in the voice where the alignment of harmonics to formants is no longer advantageous. Overall vocal power and tone quality will be lost if an adjustment is not made. The particular point in the male voice where this occurs is as the 2nd harmonic passes F1. Visualizing harmonics and the /e/ vowel in a spectragraph As illustration of this, what follows is a series of spectragraphs made with different fundamentals sung to the vowel /e/ (ay), made using my own, baritone, voice. As representative of a lower chest voice tone, the first is of the A natural just a bit more than an octave below middle C , also known as A2. Each vertical blue line represents the intensity of a particular harmonic, where 'up' = louder. Low frequency harmonics start on the left side. The leftmost peak is from the fundamental, and if you look at each peak to the right of that (increasing frequency of harmonic), you can see that the 4th harmonic is the very tallest, and then the peaks become successively shorter. This peak volume for the 4th harmonic, and the emphasis of those surrounding it, is the result of Formant 1, F1 in its position for /e/ in my voice. Harmonics to the 'left' of the formant center get progressively louder as they get nearer to it, and those to the 'right' of the formant center get softer. Proceeding to the right is a section of quite harmonics, not so tall in the display, and then there is another build up to the 13th harmonic. This is the area amplified as a result of the location of Formant 2, F2. The spacing of F1 and F2 is what makes this vowel sound like 'ay' to the listener. After another gap, there are two more areas of emphasis, which are the result of F3 and F4, clustered together. These formants move very little vowel-to-vowel, and form the high frequency 'brightness' resonances of the singer's formant. The reason we start with this: for any given vowel pronunciation, (like /e/) the formants stay at the same locations even while the fundamental (and the associated harmonics) are moved during the production of different notes. Especially important in the understanding of the male passaggio is the relationship of F1, F2 and how the harmonics align with them. A2 on /e/ vowel. Harmonic spacing As mentioned earlier, for any given sung note, harmonics are always the same frequency distance apart. That frequency spacing is the same frequency as the fundamental... the note being sung. So, if a fundamental is 110 cycles per second (like that A2,) all the harmonics will be 110 cycles apart from their neighboring harmonics. You can see this equal spacing in the picture above. Because of the closeness of the harmonic spacing, you are able to see pretty well the 'shape' of the formant regions. Up an Octave The next picture is of the same /e/ vowel, but singing the A up one octave, the A just below middle C, A3, which is 220 cycles per second. Notice that the peaks are farther from each other than in the prior picture... now they are 220 cycles per second apart. Looking at the peaks for a moment, you can see that the amplification effects of F1 and F2 are still in the same place (left to right), but now different numbered harmonics are boosted, and fewer harmonics are affected by each individual formant. In the case of F1, the 3rd harmonic is now the most emphasized, with the 2nd harmonic also getting some help, while F2 is emphasizing the 7th harmonic tremendously, but not much else. This excellent alignment of F2 with a harmonic makes it really ring distinctively, and is an example of 2nd-formant tuning, which will get discussed later. Finding the exact location of F1 for /e/ Are you curious about the exact location of F1? Look at the bottom of this next picture, right beween harmonics 2 and 3. See the blips? All voices have some soft, non-harmonic noise. When that noise falls under a formant, it gets amplified enough to measure. These low blips on the spectragraph are the giveaway to the location of the formant. A3 on /e/ vowel Continuing the scale upward As I continue up the scale from A3, three things happen due to the musical intervals represented by the harmonics: 1) My 2nd harmonic gets closer and closer to F1, strengthing that harmonic. This makes the warmth of the voice 'bloom' in this region, and the resonance makes it possible to oversing some and still get away with it. 2) My 3rd harmonic gets higher above F1, and so it gets progressively softer. In combination with #1, this changes the tone quality somewhat. 3) F2 tunes to successively lower harmonics. These three trends are very important in understanding the male passaggio. More on 'What happens when a harmonic rises above a formant'? As a particular harmonic rises above a formant center, it rapidly decreases in intensity. In this next picture, now singing Bb3 (up just one half step from the A), you can see the effect on the 3rd harmonic. It is quite softer now when compared to the 2nd harmonic. For this note, the principal power of the vowel is being carried by the 2nd harmonic. You may also note that the F2 tuning is emphasizing harmonics 6 and 7 more or less equally. That is because F2 is between them. Harmonic 7 is no longer in the 'ringing' position, and harmonic 6 is not yet high enough to be there. Bb3 /e/ vowel The male upper chest voice My voice is now in the 'fattest' part of the upper chest voice, where most of the vowel power is coming from the 2nd harmonic. This range is just about a perfect 5th wide, because that is the spacing of the 2nd and 3rd harmonics. The region begins as the 3rd harmonic passes F1, and ends as the 2nd harmonic passes F1, in other words, for my /e/ vowel, from the Ab below middle C, to the Eb above middle C. This is what makes my voice a 'low baritone' quality. (Note, you can still see the noise blip.. its getting closer to the 2nd harmonic the higher I sing) Now, the Db in the following picture. Notice that there are little noise blips on each side of the 2nd harmonic. This indicates optimum alignment of the harmonic with F1, the place where the 2nd harmonic is exactly aligned with F1. Db4 /e/ vowel The effects of strong resonance on ease-of-singing Through the entire compass of my voice, up to this point, lower harmonics have been boosted by F1, which has provided for some cushioning effect for the vocal bands. That situation is about to change significantly as the fundamental rises past this point. A very important challenge to the singer as this happens is to resist the temptation to maintain vocal power via pushing. And now to the Eb. The 2nd harmonic has just past F1. Its still very strong, but will lose ground very rapidly as I proceed upward. This is the beginning of the tricky section of the passaggio, where the resonance provided to the 2nd harmonic decreases rapidly, and I must, to retain vocal power and tone quality, find another way to shape the vowel. Eb4 /e/ vowel My next post, 'Male voice passaggio 102' will discuss the various strategies that can be used to retain resonance through the passaggio.
  12. Introduction In the male voice lower and mid ranges, (what has been traditionally called the "chest voice"), the harmonic structure of the sung tone contains many partials - harmonics, which fit nicely into the pattern of resonances for any particular vowel chosen. Throughout this range, the strong, lower harmonics are reinforced by the first vowel resonance corresponding with Formant 1, (F1), midrange harmonics are reinforced by the second vowel resonance from Formant 2 (F2), and higher harmonics are emphasized by the higher "twang" or "singer's" formant resonances. The combination of multiple, powerful low, midrange, and high harmonics present in all vowels is a distinctive characteristic of this section of the male voice. In contrast with this, in the male high range, (what has been traditionally called the 'head voice'), the harmonics produced by the voice are higher in frequency and more widely spaced. Here, few of the harmonics fit into the vowel resonance pattern. For one particular span of notes in the head voice, there is no significant resonance available to amplify the lowest two harmonics produced. To achieve vocal power and consistency of tone in the high voice, the male singer uses what he has available, "twang" (singer's formant) and the resonance from F2 strengthening harmonic 3 or 4, depending on vowel. Between these two resonance strategies is a region of transition, too high for the 'chest voice' strategy, and too low for the F2 alignments of the 'head voice' strategy. This transition region is the passaggio. Acoustics of the rising fundamental Throughout the voice, as the fundamental frequency moves, the alignment of harmonics and resonances for a vowel changes. On an upward-moving scale or leap, the fundamental and all the overtones rise in frequency. Since the harmonics are spaced at multiples of the fundamental, the harmonics also get farther apart, too. For most of the chest voice range, this is not an issue, as the resonance from F1 covers a wide frequency range, and midrange harmonics are close enough together for at least 2 or 3 of them to get some benefit from F2. These conditions apply to all the vowels. However, in an upward pitch pattern, as the voice passes middle C (C-F, depending on voice type) eventually the scale reaches a region in the voice where the alignment of harmonics to formants is no longer advantageous. Overall vocal power and tone quality will be lost if an adjustment is not made. The particular point in the male voice where this occurs is as the 2nd harmonic passes F1. Visualizing harmonics and the /e/ vowel in a spectragraph As illustration of this, what follows is a series of spectragraphs made with different fundamentals sung to the vowel /e/ (ay), made using my own, baritone, voice. As representative of a lower chest voice tone, the first is of the A natural just a bit more than an octave below middle C , also known as A2. Each vertical blue line represents the intensity of a particular harmonic, where 'up' = louder. Low frequency harmonics start on the left side. The leftmost peak is from the fundamental, and if you look at each peak to the right of that (increasing frequency of harmonic), you can see that the 4th harmonic is the very tallest, and then the peaks become successively shorter. This peak volume for the 4th harmonic, and the emphasis of those surrounding it, is the result of Formant 1, F1 in its position for /e/ in my voice. Harmonics to the 'left' of the formant center get progressively louder as they get nearer to it, and those to the 'right' of the formant center get softer. Proceeding to the right is a section of quite harmonics, not so tall in the display, and then there is another build up to the 13th harmonic. This is the area amplified as a result of the location of Formant 2, F2. The spacing of F1 and F2 is what makes this vowel sound like 'ay' to the listener. After another gap, there are two more areas of emphasis, which are the result of F3 and F4, clustered together. These formants move very little vowel-to-vowel, and form the high frequency 'brightness' resonances of the singer's formant. The reason we start with this: for any given vowel pronunciation, (like /e/) the formants stay at the same locations even while the fundamental (and the associated harmonics) are moved during the production of different notes. Especially important in the understanding of the male passaggio is the relationship of F1, F2 and how the harmonics align with them. A2 on /e/ vowel. Harmonic spacing As mentioned earlier, for any given sung note, harmonics are always the same frequency distance apart. That frequency spacing is the same frequency as the fundamental... the note being sung. So, if a fundamental is 110 cycles per second (like that A2,) all the harmonics will be 110 cycles apart from their neighboring harmonics. You can see this equal spacing in the picture above. Because of the closeness of the harmonic spacing, you are able to see pretty well the 'shape' of the formant regions. Up an Octave The next picture is of the same /e/ vowel, but singing the A up one octave, the A just below middle C, A3, which is 220 cycles per second. Notice that the peaks are farther from each other than in the prior picture... now they are 220 cycles per second apart. Looking at the peaks for a moment, you can see that the amplification effects of F1 and F2 are still in the same place (left to right), but now different numbered harmonics are boosted, and fewer harmonics are affected by each individual formant. In the case of F1, the 3rd harmonic is now the most emphasized, with the 2nd harmonic also getting some help, while F2 is emphasizing the 7th harmonic tremendously, but not much else. This excellent alignment of F2 with a harmonic makes it really ring distinctively, and is an example of 2nd-formant tuning, which will get discussed later. Finding the exact location of F1 for /e/ Are you curious about the exact location of F1? Look at the bottom of this next picture, right beween harmonics 2 and 3. See the blips? All voices have some soft, non-harmonic noise. When that noise falls under a formant, it gets amplified enough to measure. These low blips on the spectragraph are the giveaway to the location of the formant. A3 on /e/ vowel Continuing the scale upward As I continue up the scale from A3, three things happen due to the musical intervals represented by the harmonics: 1) My 2nd harmonic gets closer and closer to F1, strengthing that harmonic. This makes the warmth of the voice 'bloom' in this region, and the resonance makes it possible to oversing some and still get away with it. 2) My 3rd harmonic gets higher above F1, and so it gets progressively softer. In combination with #1, this changes the tone quality somewhat. 3) F2 tunes to successively lower harmonics. These three trends are very important in understanding the male passaggio. More on 'What happens when a harmonic rises above a formant'? As a particular harmonic rises above a formant center, it rapidly decreases in intensity. In this next picture, now singing Bb3 (up just one half step from the A), you can see the effect on the 3rd harmonic. It is quite softer now when compared to the 2nd harmonic. For this note, the principal power of the vowel is being carried by the 2nd harmonic. You may also note that the F2 tuning is emphasizing harmonics 6 and 7 more or less equally. That is because F2 is between them. Harmonic 7 is no longer in the 'ringing' position, and harmonic 6 is not yet high enough to be there. Bb3 /e/ vowel The male upper chest voice My voice is now in the 'fattest' part of the upper chest voice, where most of the vowel power is coming from the 2nd harmonic. This range is just about a perfect 5th wide, because that is the spacing of the 2nd and 3rd harmonics. The region begins as the 3rd harmonic passes F1, and ends as the 2nd harmonic passes F1, in other words, for my /e/ vowel, from the Ab below middle C, to the Eb above middle C. This is what makes my voice a 'low baritone' quality. (Note, you can still see the noise blip.. its getting closer to the 2nd harmonic the higher I sing) Now, the Db in the following picture. Notice that there are little noise blips on each side of the 2nd harmonic. This indicates optimum alignment of the harmonic with F1, the place where the 2nd harmonic is exactly aligned with F1. Db4 /e/ vowel The effects of strong resonance on ease-of-singing Through the entire compass of my voice, up to this point, lower harmonics have been boosted by F1, which has provided for some cushioning effect for the vocal bands. That situation is about to change significantly as the fundamental rises past this point. A very important challenge to the singer as this happens is to resist the temptation to maintain vocal power via pushing. And now to the Eb. The 2nd harmonic has just past F1. Its still very strong, but will lose ground very rapidly as I proceed upward. This is the beginning of the tricky section of the passaggio, where the resonance provided to the 2nd harmonic decreases rapidly, and I must, to retain vocal power and tone quality, find another way to shape the vowel. Eb4 /e/ vowel My next post, 'Male voice passaggio 102' will discuss the various strategies that can be used to retain resonance through the passaggio. View full articles
  13. Chryssanthemis - Listen (Live)

    "Listen" is οne of four new songs written for the feature version of Dreamgirls (originally a 1981 Broadway musical). Ιt's lyrics make reference to tenacity, love, the refusal to defer dreams and finally rise towards fame.In the film version of Dreamgirls, Knowles portrays the character of Deena Jones, a pop singer loosely based on Motown star Diana Ross. The story explores the life of The Dreamettes (based on The Supremes), a fictional 1960s group of three female singers,whose manager Curtis Taylor (based on Berry Gordy and played by Jamie Foxx) manipulates their personal and professional relationships.I Hope you Enjoy it!Official Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ChryssanthemisModern Music Arts Facebook Page: :https://www.facebook.com/modernmusicartsModern Music Studios Facebook Page:https://www.facebook.com/modernmusica...Video Editing: Modern Music StudiosElectric Guitar: Steve SovolosPianoAikaterini DeliyiannidouBass Guitar: Dimitris VerginisKeyboards: Kleanthis KonstantinidisDrums: Fotis Yiannopoulos
  14. View File Voce Vista Formant Tuning Software VoceVista - Vocal Training Software Turn any computer into one of the most powerful, yet easy to use tools to increase the power and range of your singing voice. VoceVista provides immediate feedback on your singing so you can analyze what you're doing in real time, make changes and see how those changes help you improve dramatically and quickly. The software also lets you save your sessions, or analyze your favorite singers' recordings to see what they're doing. VoceVista & The Science Of Vocal Bridges - Formants In SingingThe VoceVista digital download offering is easy to install and use. In a matter of minutes, your computer will be running the world's only formant tuning software specifically designed for singers. Sing into your computer's internal mic (no need for an expensive recording mic) and you'll see immediate feedback. It's that simple. With more experience, you can start to take advantage of other, more detailed information that the software reveals to help you improve even further. VoceVista - Academically Acclaimed See what teachers and students at hundreds of university music schools around the world have already discovered using VoceVista: that a computer-based feedback mechanism is one of the most effective ways to improve singing technique. Dr. Donald MillerOne of the world's leading vocal formant research scientists"VoceVista gives you powerful visual feedback so you can see the harmonics of your singing. Immediately, you can tune and calibrate your voice to an optimized harmonic color and resonant energy." Note For Apple iOS Users Note: VoceVista currently runs only on the Windows operating system, however, you can run the software on Apple computers running Windows (either in Bootcamp, or using a virtual machine). Submitter TMV World Team Submitted 09/10/2015 Category TMV World Training Tools & Apps.
  15. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    VoceVista - Vocal Training Software Turn any computer into one of the most powerful, yet easy to use tools to increase the power and range of your singing voice. VoceVista provides immediate feedback on your singing so you can analyze what you're doing in real time, make changes and see how those changes help you improve dramatically and quickly. The software also lets you save your sessions, or analyze your favorite singers' recordings to see what they're doing. VoceVista & The Science Of Vocal Bridges - Formants In SingingThe VoceVista digital download offering is easy to install and use. In a matter of minutes, your computer will be running the world's only formant tuning software specifically designed for singers. Sing into your computer's internal mic (no need for an expensive recording mic) and you'll see immediate feedback. It's that simple. With more experience, you can start to take advantage of other, more detailed information that the software reveals to help you improve even further. VoceVista - Academically Acclaimed See what teachers and students at hundreds of university music schools around the world have already discovered using VoceVista: that a computer-based feedback mechanism is one of the most effective ways to improve singing technique. Dr. Donald MillerOne of the world's leading vocal formant research scientists"VoceVista gives you powerful visual feedback so you can see the harmonics of your singing. Immediately, you can tune and calibrate your voice to an optimized harmonic color and resonant energy." Note For Apple iOS Users Note: VoceVista currently runs only on the Windows operating system, however, you can run the software on Apple computers running Windows (either in Bootcamp, or using a virtual machine).

    $60.00

  16. I recorded pretty nice song made by U2, it's Song for someone. Please say a few words about my singing and my english (I mean accent etc.). Hang on!
  17. Haven't posted here in a while since the transformation of the site - I've been training a lot since then though and wanted to share some things I've worked on. Last year I think I was singing with kind of a high larynx and heavy throat placement, but I have been trying to balance my voice for the past year. I also think my voice got...lower? Fuller? Or my vocal musculature just isn't done growing, not sure. The hardest part of this was definitely the high closed vowels and the bridge/end section. I enjoy Christmas music all year-round, I know it's kind of weird but it just feels good. I sang this a fifth lower than the original and tried to match some of her inflections, but got rid of the high ad libs at the end since they weren't sitting right with me. Any and all feedback is welcome, and thanks for listening. https://app.box.com/s/7i2unpu3pmi6yi76k9q4503p13mlahrj
  18. Singing extreme notes

    I go from f#2 up to f#5 then a slight squeaky whistle at f#6. I thought it sounded really cool so im sharing it on the forum. IMG_5197.mp3
  19. Hey guys, started another take on yet another song. comments/critiques/pointers will be appreciated Thanks. You Know You're Right. http://www.reverbnation.com/grungemaniac1/songs
  20. Version

    0 downloads

    Steve Fraser is a noted expert on vowel modification, phonetics and formants for singing. Mr. Fraser is a recognized expert in the analysis of spectrograph analysis of singing. A spectrogram is a a time-varying spectral representation (forming an image) that shows how the spectral density of a signal varies with time. In the field of Time-Frequency Signal Processing, it is one of the most popular quadratic Time-Frequency Distribution that represents a signal in a joint time-frequency domain and that has the property of being positive. Mr. Fraser has a Bachelor’s in Vocal Music Education from Millikin University, and a Master’s in Choral Conducting from Washington University in St. Louis. Mr Fraser is also an active member at The Modern Vocalist World Forum. Steve Fraser www.SteveFraser.com

    Free

  21. Version

    6 downloads

    Robert Lunte is the owner founder of the The Vocalist Studio International www.TheVocalistStudio.com, an Internationally recognized voice training school for extreme singing vocal techniques and advanced vocal instruction. Robert is also the author and producer of the critically acclaimed vocal instruction training system, “The Four Pillars of Singing”. TVS techniques are shared around the world by voice teachers as part of the TVS International Certified Instructor Program, which is one of the fastest growing vocal organizations of highly trained voice coaches in the world today. Robert is also the founder of The Modern Vocalist World www.TheModernVocalistWorld.com, the #1 online resource for vocal education and networking on the internet. This download include four separate interviews of Robert Lunte. www.TheFourPillarsofSinging.com

    Free