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Found 384 results

  1. HI. I suffered of an eating disorder since I was 9. Im in recovery now and doing very well, but my body is still healing and I still have health problems. I used to purge and I know this dameges vocal cords. I wanted to know if anyone know how I can heal my vocal cords. thank you
  2. We're working with one of the best independent UK Dance labels and currently looking for a vocalist for an exciting new release. We need a singer with a vocal tone very similar to Marvin Gaye to record a topline on a dance track. You must either be able to travel to London to record or have access to recording equipment to record the vocals.Once accepted through to the workspace we'll request you to record a short vocal demo which we will submit to our client for them to make the final decision. If you are then chosen for this project, we'll provide you with the full brief for you to be able to record the topline. The budget is £250/£300 for recording the vocal topline. See http://www.themodernvocalistworld.com/forum/15-seeking-vocalist-vocalist-available/
  3. I hate myself for even asking this and i KNOW i should just give it up, singing or not singing, but i wanna know if anyone knows how hard does cigarette smoking affects your vocal abilities.   I know it cant be good, and im reall trying to quit, and singing is probably my biggest motivation for quiting singing, tough its extremel hard. Im only 21 but ive been smoking  a pack of cigs a day for 7 years now.   Not to mention that this habit of mine is costing me 2-3 lessons monthly with Maestro Lunte. Guess you have to be a moron to spend money on poison. but i guess im that moron.   So did anyone read up on any studies of how ciggarette someking affects your ability to sing?
  4. For the pipe organ an open valve will trigger the sound of the pipe. The key of a song tells us which valves we can open safely to stay in harmony. Singers have a comfort zone All singers have a comfort zone, a range of notes that sound best and can be performed effortless. Despite of the ability to expand the vocal range through training, every singer has an individual physical quality which is responsible for the position of the comfort zone within the vocal spectrum. We may not consciously observe this, but the habit of speaking is already giving us a clue about this range. In classic musical education we classify this range by defining voice types, though this method is mostly a helpful convergence to reality. For the singer it is therefore essential to spend some effort on song choice, especially to ensure that a song lies within his or her vocal abilities. Of course that is not the only consideration during song choice, and if you are interested we invite you to read our article "Improve Your Song Choice" to find out more. Another possibility is to simply change the range of notes to be performed by changing the key of the song. The original key Every song was written in an original key. The key we know for any of these songs could be the one it was written in, or it could be the key used when the recording we know was produced. We still refer to it as original key. Original keys are usually relatively easy to access. They may be documented in sheet music, or available in databases, per example for DJ's that research harmonic mixing, among other sources. It also can be determined by examining the chords and notes of the song. It is to mention that a key can and oftentimes does change within a song. The key a song is regarded to be in is most often starting in the key and at one point returning to the same key before the end. Find out what exactly a key is, and how keys are transitioned in our article "Musical Keys and the Key Change". Here is an example. A song written or performed in a G Major key is based on the tonic note of G, and includes a system of notes defined by the major scale that is also based on the tonic note. The chord progressions used in the song will to a great extent lie within the scale, with the tonic chord being the foundation of those progressions. What happens between the use of G Major may be harmonic movement and/or modulation. Lead Vocals and original keys Here at Lead Vocals we consider our practice section as a tool to quickly review and learn the melody, timing, phrasing, and mood of a performance. In addition we think that the tool enables vocalists to study other artists by paying close attention to ingredients like dialect and pronunciation in language, the choice of placing words or phrases within rhythm and beats, any habits, and style and musical influences. Unlike other existing tools like per example some karaoke platforms we do not offer access to the same performance in multiple keys. But just recently we have introduced additional helpful information about many of the songs available here within the tagging system. At present we offer selection by tonic pitch, musical key, and scale information which can be helpful to explore new music. We think that from an educational point of view the choice of the tonic pitch is most interesting, because many melodies in songs may start or end with the tonic note. If a vocalist can deliver that note in a rich, strong, and compelling tonal quality that makes the audience want to hear more, then the song choice by tonic pitch may lead to the discovery of suitable songs for the singer. You may give this a try by selecting a song to practice by tonic pitch. Continue solving the mystery Find out why vocalists change the key of a song and how they approach the key change. In an attempt to solve the mystery behind the musical key we define what a key is, and explain the background of harmonic movement, chord progressions, and modulation. We also include the consideration of emotional characteristics for all keys based on the major and minor scale, that may play an additional role in the selection process for the vocalist. Further we're taking a brief look at common practice in recording sessions. Continue reading about this topic in our article "Musical Keys and the Key Change" at http://www.leadvocals.ca/background/musical-keys-and-the-key-change Additional Information Our Practice Section at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/practice Try to Sing Along at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/lyrics/songs What is Lead Vocals? Lead Vocals is a free of charge online resource for aspiring vocalists, who are learning the craft of singing and who practice their art by singing along to playback recordings and to other selected musical performances on video. All recordings are hand selected and the lyrics are spot on matching to the performance of the lead vocalist. The tool allows for quick access to practice specific parts within a song. We especially took care in avoiding clutter and disruptive advertising. Follow us on Social Media https://facebook.com/leadvocals.ca https://plus.google.com/+LeadvocalsCa https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadvocals https://www.twitter.com/leadvocalsca https://www.youtube.com/LeadvocalsCa
  5. Proper Breathing for Vocalists Breath is the motor of our voice. Knowing how to breathe correctly and being able to control it is one of the most important skills a singer can have. A proper breathing technique will enable us to sound great and to improve the tone of our voice. Our ability to sustain notes will increase and we will master to sing longer phrases more effortless. Breathing is a natural process of our body and therefore a good breathing technique comes natural and unforced. Methods of Breathing The human body knows several different ways of breathing which are called costal or chest breathing, clavicular breathing, abdominal or belly breathing, and diapragmatic breathing. The latter two are to prefer when it comes to singing, though only the diapragmatic method allows for full breath with maximum control. The diaphragm by the way is a muscle system that is located in the abdominal region right under the lungs. It controls the air flow by contracting when we breathe in and relaxing when we breathe out. Breath Support As a singer you want to learn slowing down the relaxation of the diaphragm to gain extra volume used for sustaining notes and sing longer phrases. This is called "breath support" and can be achieved in two different ways, either by adding a bit of muscle force during exhalation and while using your voice, or through lowering the muscle force used during inhalation. While the first method allows for an increased volume the latter will result in less air pressure in the lungs which in turn will slow down the exhalation process to the extent that you can sing longer. The second method is popular through the "Italian School" of singing, also known as Appoggio, which includes resonance factors in form of phonation alongside the breath management. Exercises to improve breathing Understanding the theory behind how the body masters the task of breathing builds the base for the vocalist to improve upon his or her own breathing technique, however the singer also needs to build an understanding on an experimental level. For this reason it is well worth to experiment with a few exercises to gain an additional understanding. At Lead Vocals we have collected a number of exercises to get you started. Continue reading about the topic and these exercises at - http://www.leadvocals.ca/improve/breathing Additional Information Our Practice Section at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/practice Try to Sing Along at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/lyrics/songs What is Lead Vocals? Lead Vocals is a free of charge online resource for aspiring vocalists, who are learning the craft of singing and who practice their art by singing along to playback recordings and to other selected musical performances on video. All recordings are hand selected and the lyrics are spot on matching to the performance of the lead vocalist. The tool allows for quick access to practice specific parts within a song. We especially took care in avoiding clutter and disruptive advertising. Follow us on Social Media https://facebook.com/leadvocals.ca https://plus.google.com/+LeadvocalsCa https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadvocals https://www.twitter.com/leadvocalsca https://www.youtube.com/LeadvocalsCa
  6. The Importance of Vocal Anatomy for Singers The human voice is powered by breath, produced by vibrations, and shaped by resonance. "In every field the man who can merely do things without knowing why is at a disadvantage to the one who can not only build but also tell you just why he is building in that way. This is especially noticeable when the prescribed cycle does not obey the laws it is supposed to: then the labourer must sit by with folded hands while the mechanic or engineer comes in and adjusts the delicate mechanism. " Reuben Fine, Chess Grandmaster, Psychologist, Professor and Author We all can talk and sing without any further knowledge of the physiological mechanism that sets off our voice. It is when we start studying to become better at our craft, that we challenge ourselves in learning new techniques and in correcting bad habits and behaviour to achieve a specific sound. During our studies we will sooner or later get in touch with the topic of vocal anatomy and its terms. Knowing the anatomic elements and their function is essential for the purpose of communication, be it between vocal instructor and student, or in literature. The standardized anatomic terminology ensures that we can exchange ideas, techniques and instructions with great precision. The study of vocal anatomy will in addition help the vocalist to understand the mechanics and limitations of the human voice, and will function as a guide to choose those vocal techniques that respect the anatomic background of the voice. The newly acquired knowledge will increase awareness of the different parts involved in the creation of our voice, and will support us to develop a feeling for these organs during singing. What are these organs and how do they work? The background section at Lead Vocals has an article that describes the mechanism of our voice and the involved organs. Find out how our voice is created in the human body, how we achieve a powerful voice, how we produce pitch, and how we influence our vocal qualities at - http://www.leadvocals.ca/background/anatomy-of-the-voice Additional Information Our Practice Section at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/practice Try to Sing Along at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/lyrics/songs What is Lead Vocals? Lead Vocals is a free of charge online resource for aspiring vocalists, who are learning the craft of singing and who practice their art by singing along to playback recordings and to other selected musical performances on video. All recordings are hand selected and the lyrics are spot on matching to the performance of the lead vocalist. The tool allows for quick access to practice specific parts within a song. We especially took care in avoiding clutter and disruptive advertising. Follow us on Social Media https://facebook.com/leadvocals.ca https://plus.google.com/+LeadvocalsCa https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadvocals https://www.twitter.com/leadvocalsca https://www.youtube.com/LeadvocalsCa
  7. REMEMBERING JEANNIE DEVA MY COLLEAGUE & FRIEND THANK YOU JEANNIE... I was very saddened by the news of Jeannie's passing. Jeannie was in fact, a friend of mine. We first met in her home 2006, when I was under contract with TC-Helicon as the Voice Council Director as the first manager of Voice Council.com. As such, I traveled to LA and met with Jeannie and brought her on board to Voice Council. It was I, that first introduced Jeannie Deva to VoiceCouncil.com. and that was when we forged our friendship.As years went by, Jeannie and I engaged in a lot of cooperative projects and some business deals that were always a pleasure. When I think of Jeannie Deva, one of the first things that comes to my mind is that she was very loyal as a colleague and as a friend. Jeannie was the kind of person that rose above petty politics. Jeannie had a sort of,... "above all that" vibe to her that made me feel very comfortable and at peace in her presence. It always instilled a lot of trust in our friendship. Apart from the personal reflections, Jeannie was a great voice coach. She knew what she was doing to be sure. The world was fortunate to be able to share in her gift for teaching, charisma and positive karma. Today, I still think of Jeannie from time to time and I do not believe that will change.Thank you Jeannie for your friendship and for maintaining a high level of integrity in our dealings. I will definitely miss you.Respectfully,Robert Lunte... below are two recordings I have kept in my private music collection of Jeannie singing... very beautiful. 01-- Jeannie Deva - Whiter Shade of Pale.mp3 01-- Jeannie Deva - Melodia Sentimental.mp3
  8. REMEMBERING JEANNIE DEVA MY COLLEAGUE & FRIEND THANK YOU JEANNIE... I was very saddened by the news of Jeannie's passing. Jeannie was in fact, a friend of mine. We first met in her home 2006, when I was under contract with TC-Helicon as the Voice Council Director as the first manager of Voice Council.com. As such, I traveled to LA and met with Jeannie and brought her on board to Voice Council. It was I, that first introduced Jeannie Deva to VoiceCouncil.com. and that was when we forged our friendship.As years went by, Jeannie and I engaged in a lot of cooperative projects and some business deals that were always a pleasure. When I think of Jeannie Deva, one of the first things that comes to my mind is that she was very loyal as a colleague and as a friend. Jeannie was the kind of person that rose above petty politics. Jeannie had a sort of,... "above all that" vibe to her that made me feel very comfortable and at peace in her presence. It always instilled a lot of trust in our friendship. Apart from the personal reflections, Jeannie was a great voice coach. She knew what she was doing to be sure. The world was fortunate to be able to share in her gift for teaching, charisma and positive karma. Today, I still think of Jeannie from time to time and I do not believe that will change.Thank you Jeannie for your friendship and for maintaining a high level of integrity in our dealings. I will definitely miss you.Respectfully,Robert Lunte... below are two recordings I have kept in my private music collection of Jeannie singing... very beautiful. 01-- Jeannie Deva - Whiter Shade of Pale.mp3 01-- Jeannie Deva - Melodia Sentimental.mp3 View full articles
  9. falsetto

    Hello, I recently got cast in the role of Katisha in the Mikado. The fun part? I'm a baritone. I found out when auditions were happening that I could hit the F5 required for the part in falsetto, so I tried out and was cast in the role. However, as rehearsals have gone on, my falsetto has gotten weaker and weaker, and in fact my range in chest voice has suffered as well. I think I might be straining my voice too much, though when I'm fully warmed up and singing it feels fine. Today, I can't sing any falsetto at all. I don't know if I just need to rest my voice for a while, or if I need to drop the part. I'm not experiencing any pain, but I'm really worried that I might be damaging my voice, because I definitely have much less stamina in falsetto.
  10. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>>
  11. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>> View full articles
  12. More and more, we are hearing about well-known artists losing their voices, cancelling their shows and tours and undergoing vocal surgeries. Nevertheless, the amateur singers lose their voices in an everyday basis as well, we just don’t hear about it as much. And lastly speakers: They are caught completely by surprise when their speaking voice seizes on them “out of the blue” or, at least, they think so. In reality, the voice loss is always premeditated. The worse it is for speakers, as they’re completely not expecting anything like that and the lost voice is getting them, the least to say, in shock. The fact is that they do not realize that the voice is a vulnerable organ and could break very easily. Singers are, by far, more aware about it and those who proceed with caution, so to speak, are able to keep their voice healthy and lengthy for the rest of their lives. So what about those who don’t know about voice preservation? We have the answer for them. The Vocal Science technique, which we advocate, suggests you to use the different set of muscles (which are your facial muscles), instead of the vocal box muscles. The facial muscles contain the sinus (vocal) cavities within. That is where the voice (as a muscle) with the support of the abdominal muscles will get in and get secured within those cavities. Then with the proper breathing control, (also supported by the abdominal muscles), the sound gets projected to its aimed destination. So, at that point, the mission is accomplished, as the wholesome mechanism, which allows the voice to work in its fullest capacity possible and with no pain or strain on the vocal anatomy, has been instilled in the human muscles and psyche.
  13. I have more and more inquiries from people who used to sing for the longest time in the past; and suddenly, (or at least so they thought), lost their singing range and some of them even lost their singing voice altogether. Now they are older and in their 40s (and counting), and they still cannot get a grip with the notion that their love and joy of singing might never be present again. 20 or 30 years later after the occurrence, they are still upset and even depressed about it. Of course, they have been through numerous doctors and speech therapists appointments; but in the majority of cases, it did not add up to any expected results. Needless to say, since they had lost their love and joy being able to sing, their lives were never the same. Their passion and desire for expressing themselves, (telling their stories through singing), had been deeply buried. What would it take to recover one’s singing voice? Is it even possible?If it were possible, how would it impact the long-term sufferer’s life?I, fortunately, could give the answers to all of the above: To answer the first question, luckily, in majority of cases, it is absolutely possible How does it happen that the singing voice, “all of a sudden, disappears”, (so to speak), you may ask? Some people are born with natural singing talent and once they discover it, they obviously begin to use it, and rightfully so. However, enjoying their newly found voice, they use it excessively and thus, not being aware of the proper voice application and vocal technique, they end up abusing it to the “point of no return”, at least in the conventional sense. For some reason, neither them nor their mentors realize that the singers’ vocal cords are not made from steel. In fact, they are very fragile and have to be treated with special care. Like any instrument, it requires a frequent tune-up and, of course, proper maintenance. Usually, the young and talented artists who get discovered via their talents and looks have no idea how to power their voice without any pain or strain on their vocal anatomy. So they pull and push their voices full force. And one day, sooner or later, the voice “pops”, as one of my voice repair clients described it. The musicians often use the expression, “No gig lasts forever”. Indeed! Nobody should take his or her voice, (or other anatomy for that mater), for granted. If you are entering any high tasking field, (singing performance included), please research, (and act accordingly), how not to kill your voice, but rather the opposite; how to preserve and nurture your internal, fragile instrument – Your Voice! As to recover it and restore it to its original state would take a great effort on the part of the singer and a very experienced voice specialist. To answer the second question, the voice recovery and restoration is a huge deal and when it is complete, some people begin to rethink the purpose of their lives. It is a little difficult to turn the clock back and now leave their present lives and come back to something what was very precious in the past. As we all know, there is no change without change, even if it is positive. However, in any case, the benefits of a newly found voice are countless: The confidence, the self-esteem and self-worth, the dignity and integrity, the pride of accomplishment... and just simply recovered joy and passion. What price tag could you put on that?!
  14. Artists: Save your voice.Producers: Have an easier role with the well-trained artist who will not lose their voice during the production.Managers: Save time, money and aggravation by your artists not cancelling their performances, tours and other appearances.Let’s look at the recent related events: Singer, Mariah Carey, who has recently been on tour in Japan, was embarrassing herself while literally losing her voice on stage singing off key and not reaching any of the high notes. Obviously, she needs some sort of voice repair before it will become irreparable. Also, people who loved and cherished her before are now deeply disappointed and even some of them are quite annoyed, as she definitely has not lived up to their expectations. So this is the question. Why, neither her or more so, her manager, do nothing about it? Are they waiting for the time where a vocal operation will be inevitable? Why bring it to that drastic point? Who knows? I do not have an answer. Let’s look at the situation of Chad Kroeger of Nickelback. He was recently diagnosed with an operable cyst on his vocal box. I, personally being a voice specialist, knew for quite some time that there is something wrong with his voice, let alone his singing overall, which is definitely not up-to-par, (at least from where I sit). I knew that sooner rather than later, that he will not be able to push his voice around much longer. As all musicians know, “no gig lasts forever”. Obviously, the refund for the purchased concert tickets has been already offered. My question is still the same…WHY have him and his manager had to bring it to this extent? Obviously, in this instance, everybody took a loss: The singer, the manager (management), concert promoters and the audience. However, from the point of view of the audience, rather then to listen to the not-very-adequate singing, (to put it mildly), the audience should look forward to the new and recovered voice of Chad Kroeger, and hopefully attend some of his concerts in the not-very-distant future. And lastly, Roger Daltrey: The lead singer of The Who. He was ordered a vocal rest for his vocal cords, and thus rescheduled his Toronto tour and pushed it to December (to the great disappointment of my son-in-law, who happened to be a huge fan of the artist and the band). The only problem I have with the doctors order to go on a vocal rest, in my opinion, will only help momentarily, but will never solve the actual vocal problem caused by wear and tear of the vocal cords and by not-quite-proper application of the voice which, in turn, drowned that voice in a much lower position which naturally prompts the artists to pull and push their voice out on the surface, while concurrently promoting the strain of the vocal cords. So the problem has to be rectified by going to the source, addressing the cause and then by taking the appropriate measures to recover and heal that voice so it could last for, lets say, the next 50 years. So the moral of it all is: Artists: when you notice the change in your voice in the quality and range, don’t continue singing and performing, pretending that nothing has changed. It will only bring you to a deeper vocal trouble, which will be that much harder to repair and restore back to normal. Producers: When you notice that your artist is not performing as per standards, please stop the role and address it to the artist. Please make him aware that he has to look into his voice and make sure that it is healthy enough to continue the recording production.Managers: If you want to have your artist perform and tour and not cancel his engagements, please start managing the artist’s very instrument (the voice), and if you spot a problem, please address it right away, as in the long run, the artist and you will lose more in the future then you would gain momentarily.
  15. For every singer, the question should be; do I possess the distinct tone and the uniqueness of the sound overall?It is easier said than done. Majority of people could carry a tune, but not too many could sing, I mean, really sing. First of all, the person who likes to call him/herself a singer should possess a proper vocal technique, which will allow the singer a freedom to vocalize to their hearts content. They should be able to do it with absolute ease and pleasure, and not to have hardship while trying to deliver their message to their audience. If they don’t know how to work smart, so to speak, and not hard, they also could ruin their voice in the process. And if that happens, their artistic tendencies would not count for anything. Just like in figure skating, the artistic merit is very important, as well as looks, costumes and presence on the ice. But if the skater lands 3 out of 4 jump combinations flat on the ice, the former will not count, and vice versa. So obviously, both technical and artistic merits should be very strong. Similarly in singing, the person might have a strong and powerful voice. That person could even have some knowledge of vocal technique, but his tone is not pleasant, and his passion is not there, so he sounds, quite often, very harsh, loud and robotic. There is nothing unique about that singer and he does not possess any identification of his persona. So his ‘biometric data’ is pretty shut down and obviously not thriving. If that singer performs at the bar, he will find that within the first few minutes, he has “lost” his audience. People are not listening, talking loud, eating and drinking and not paying attention to what’s happening on stage. On the contrary, when there is an artist singing in a bar or in a concert hall, projecting the right power and dynamics, knowledge, intelligence and proper vocal technique, the audience are captured by the singer and stop talking and stop eating….and stop drinking. Interestingly enough, many years ago, I was invited to do a presentation/workshop about the Vocal Science ™ technique in one of downtown Toronto’s venues. The pretty respectable bar was holding some kind of a music related event and I was invited to tell and show to the up and coming artists what the Vocal Science method is all about and how to apply it to the actual singing. The first 15-20 minutes, I thought, were very successful, as the audience was silent and completely taken by me. Then somebody tapped me on the shoulder and asked me to finish my presentation in a short order. I was extremely surprised, as the audience obviously loved it and wanted more. But then, I realized that I was producing an ‘opposite effect’ for the venue: I “took away” their customers, as almost everybody stopped talking, stopped eating, and mainly… stopped drinking. LOL.Obviously, I realized later, and after the fact, that the whole Idea for that bar was to invite as many drinking musicians as the capacity would allow. Go figure! In any other occasion, it would be considered as a desirable outcome, and so it should be! So if your biometrics are intact, your vocal technique is impeccable and your passion and desire is present, you will be remembered as, in this instance, your tone will be unique and your sound will be distinct. Achieving all of the above, consider your entire being (voice included, nevertheless) fully optimized!
  16. Lately, we are hearing more and more about people’s vocal tragediesSome of them have been suffering for years with the loss of their regular voice, speaking and/or singing. Majority of them went to all kinds of doctors and specialists and have been diagnosed with all kinds of health problems related or, most of the times, not related to their vocal performance. The loss of their original speaking and/or singing voice had been blamed on all kinds of the person’s internal health. Yes, granted some of the internal health problems may be related to the quality of the voice. For example: If the person practicing an unhealthy diet i.e. consumes a lot of dairy products, that person most likely will possess a lot of mucus everywhere in the body, vocal anatomy included. If the person eats a lot of acidic products like tomatoes, oranges, red meats and others, no doubts this person will suffer from acid reflux. That said, if they do have a problem with their range and projection of their voice, naturally, their voice is drawn to the lower position, thus it is prone to meet the gastric acid which, in turn, will begin to burn the vocal cords. That said, the inner health and outer fitness would definitely help with whichever vocal problems and/or issues the person may experience. The cleaner and more fit the physical body is, the stronger and more vibrant the persons’ mind will be also. The Vocal Science ™ method requires the lift of the voice to the set of the facial muscles/cavities to release the pressure of the sound from the vocal box and vocal cords, per say. If you visualize a ballerina trying to jump taking off of a thick carpet, you can imagine that not only she, most likely, will injure her ankle or knee, but also would never acquire a needed height to accomplish the pas de deux. That said, if the vocal cords are covered with mucus and the bottom of the throat is full of gastric acid, to lift the sound off of “that ground” could become quite difficult. For that, I am using natural herbs and remedies to clean up the surface of the vocal box to be able to achieve the lift of the voice with the support by the abdominal muscles. So the flora of the throat becomes clean and begins its healing. The doctors usually “bombard” their clients with a whole bunch of scary sounding definitions and diagnosis. The clients usually tell me that they have no idea how to read, let alone understand their medical transcriptions/reports. It is usually extremely over-exaggerated and, for the longest time, I could not understand why. One of my new clients reports suggesting that he has had preoperative and postoperative care. In reality, the person never had undergone any vocal surgery whatsoever. In the not so very distant past, I had a person who worked as a medical assistant and she advised me that every move the doctor makes has a special code. For example: If the doctor checks your blood pressure, he charges the insurance, (here in Canada), $200.00. I am, sure the ENT specialists are charging for all of their checkups, scopes, and etc.. So my assumption is that the more the doctor writes, the more he is able to charge either the insurance or the person individually. This is just my general subjective opinion. Take it for what it is. Sometimes, in fact, “they are right on the money” and they produce the right diagnosis, but they still do not offer, or even suggest, any meaningful help to the sufferer. In majority of cases, the problem is mechanical, but very often coupled with the physical and emotional state of the individual. So my duty is to dissect the problem into pieces and work on each piece individually and collectively. That’s what I call forensic analysis and expertise, and yes, it is very applicable to any voice issues.
  17. Hey guys! My doctor said i have a severely congested sinuses and that i should look into treating it. I asked if that can affect my singing and she couldnt give me a proper answer because she doesent know about mechanisms involved in singing that good.    So guys can you shed some light on it?
  18. Hi! My name is Rodrigo and I'm a new student. I have some problems because the summer is over and now we are in the autumn in Argentina, where I live. Last month I followed a couple of simple rules listed in my copy of The Four Pillars of Singing, like drink water before, during and after my training, and that water has to be in a room temperature. Every year I have the same issue: I have a hard time warming up my voice, so I can´t train as hard as I like, and I got tired earlier -not to mention that it is impossible to practice high notes without sounding awful and hurting a little bit, so I don't practice that. I'm an atlhete, not a pro athlete, but still, I played basketball for almost 10 years and now I'm into swimming. With propper warm up, I was always able to practice the sport as usual, no matter how was the weather. For that, I used to warming up twice as hard, and not starting untill I felt my muscles were ready to do the work. Having said that, is there an effective way to warm up before I start with calibrating my onsets and do the "heavy work" with the sirens? And how should be the hidratation? Is there some kind of tea that would help me to recover faster after a vocal work out that could have help you guys? I mean, one can hear a lot about the benefits of green tea, mixed up with honey, lemon and other stuffs, but, is it work? Thanks!
  19. i have been having issues with my vocal folds/glottis   I dont know why there is always a scratchy feeling inside the glottis/throat area   but the thing is that my voice nevers get hoarse in anyway with or without the pain.. its still the same   and I can get this feeling even when i am not speaking (or even after a month of vocal rest)   but the feeling is really bugging me for a long time and    I wonder if you guys know anything that can result to this   thank you so much!!!!!!
  20. Hi, TMV-ers! I thought it would be useful today to write a bit about how I approach and talk about vocal technique, in the hope that by putting these ideas out there, you can pick and choose some of them that make sense to you, and that you will hopefully find useful. As a starting point for this, I am inspired to recall an idea I read in Cornelius Reid's book, 'Voice - Psyche and Soma'. I cannot remember the exact quote, but the gist of it is that the mind and the body are acting together to produce the singing voice. I think this means for vocal technique that singing is simultaneously psychological and physical. A survey of books written on singing over the last 200 years shows that every teacher has a different approach to working with singers, a different mix of the psychological and physical. Some favor emphasis of the physical aspects, and talk about doing things with body parts, muscle groups, tendons, nasal cavities, lower jaw, the tongue, etc. Others emphasize the sensations of the singer, i.e., 'sing so that you feel such and such a sensation in such and such location in your body'. Still others rely on metaphors and imagery, i.e., 'sing out the top of your head', or 'imagine that you are projecting the tone toward a target on the wall', or 'think of a happy memory'. I don't do any of these alone. Perhaps better stated, I do them all, cherry-picking ideas and approaches from these authors that have these characteristics: 1) are based on anatomical fact, acoustical principles, and physiologically healthy bodily action. 2) are easily expressed and understood using in common language 3) can be practiced beneficially by the student without the teacher's constant supervision 4) help the singer build their ability to sing what they desire to sing - whatever genre or style that is. When it comes to teaching, I am also an optimist. :-) I believe that most people, with very few exceptions, can learn to sing for their own & others' enjoyment if they approach it with patience. In my next posts, I will be writing about the basics of how the voice works - 'what happens where' in the mind and body to produce healthy vocal tone. Along the way, I will address some common misconceptions I've encountered, and clarify some terms that are often used by singers and teachers, but not well understood. I have no illusions that the way I approach this is the only way, or even the best way. I am very interested to hear other ways of doing it as well, as that is how I learn myself. If you have a particular area you'd like to discuss, send me an e-mail or comment to my blog, and I will pull that text forward in a response. Best Regards, Steve
  21. Hi, TMV-ers! I thought it would be useful today to write a bit about how I approach and talk about vocal technique, in the hope that by putting these ideas out there, you can pick and choose some of them that make sense to you, and that you will hopefully find useful. As a starting point for this, I am inspired to recall an idea I read in Cornelius Reid's book, 'Voice - Psyche and Soma'. I cannot remember the exact quote, but the gist of it is that the mind and the body are acting together to produce the singing voice. I think this means for vocal technique that singing is simultaneously psychological and physical. A survey of books written on singing over the last 200 years shows that every teacher has a different approach to working with singers, a different mix of the psychological and physical. Some favor emphasis of the physical aspects, and talk about doing things with body parts, muscle groups, tendons, nasal cavities, lower jaw, the tongue, etc. Others emphasize the sensations of the singer, i.e., 'sing so that you feel such and such a sensation in such and such location in your body'. Still others rely on metaphors and imagery, i.e., 'sing out the top of your head', or 'imagine that you are projecting the tone toward a target on the wall', or 'think of a happy memory'. I don't do any of these alone. Perhaps better stated, I do them all, cherry-picking ideas and approaches from these authors that have these characteristics: 1) are based on anatomical fact, acoustical principles, and physiologically healthy bodily action. 2) are easily expressed and understood using in common language 3) can be practiced beneficially by the student without the teacher's constant supervision 4) help the singer build their ability to sing what they desire to sing - whatever genre or style that is. When it comes to teaching, I am also an optimist. :-) I believe that most people, with very few exceptions, can learn to sing for their own & others' enjoyment if they approach it with patience. In my next posts, I will be writing about the basics of how the voice works - 'what happens where' in the mind and body to produce healthy vocal tone. Along the way, I will address some common misconceptions I've encountered, and clarify some terms that are often used by singers and teachers, but not well understood. I have no illusions that the way I approach this is the only way, or even the best way. I am very interested to hear other ways of doing it as well, as that is how I learn myself. If you have a particular area you'd like to discuss, send me an e-mail or comment to my blog, and I will pull that text forward in a response. Best Regards, Steve View full articles
  22. Vocal Aerobics: Essentials for Today's Singers with Julie Lyonn Lieberman Running Time and Format: 60-minute instructional DVD Distributed by: Hal Leonard Corporation (7777 W. Bluemound Rd. Milwaukee, WI 53213, 800-637-2852, http://www.halleonard.com /) to bookstores, music stores and schools through the world) Release Date: September 30, 2008 Description: World-renowned music educator, Julie Lyonn Lieberman, has created an instructional DVD for singers. Her practice system focuses on cognitive illumination and muscular facility. This system can help develop a vibrating palette that communicates spirit, emotion, and viewpoint all riding effortlessly on the breath. It is supported by science yet connected to individuality. By first guiding the exercises in silence, her intent is to prevent the tension and misuse that often occur when the main impetus for the creation of musical sound is fueled by a brew of yearning and fear mixed with a fixation on the end product. Topics covered include: Section I Introduction, Creating a Cathedral, Breath Anatomy Section II Aerobicizing the Tongue, Mobilizing the Lips Section III Balancing the non-dominant side of the mouth, Posture, The Power of Imagery, Warming Up and Warming Down, Vocal Health Ms. Lieberman trusts the innate intelligence of the client by making sure that they understand how and why each region of their vocal anatomy works the way it does. Through extensive experience teaching, she has developed ergonomically based exercises that are fulcrum triggers: they get the job done more efficiently and faster. Lieberman has discovered that when the lights are turned on and the equipment is illuminated, epiphanies abound and can continue to be generated by the singer, long after the teacher leaves the room. In-depth studies while writing her critically acclaimed book. You Are Your Instrument, followed by her three spin-off DVDs (The Vocalist's Guide to Fitness, Health and Musicianship, The Instrumentalist's Guide to Fitness, Health and Musicianship, and The Violin in Motion) place a unique spin on this body of work. Most voice teachers use exercises that are effective in the long run or they would be put out of business, but the older model for mentorship entailed I do and do as I say approach. It was a faith-based relationship; the student was expected to blindly follow the teacher's directions without specifics, context, or adequate rapport with the musculature required to do the job smoothly and consciously. The belief behind that style of work was that if you repeated each exercise enough times (often while inadvertently thinking about something else), that it would help you sing better. This is the long, slow train to success. Julie believes that it's time to replace unconscious repetition with less activity, more awareness, and targeted control. She will help you convert the butcher's knife into a laser beam! To Order: see JulieLyonn.com and click on Vocalist's Corner About the author Julie Lyonn Lieberman (JulieLyonn.com) has specialized in working with creative vocalists in her NYC music studio over the last 3 decades. Her students have included artists such as Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter Vanessa Carlton, Grammy-nominated Putnam Murdock, Indie music award winner Kara Suzanne (best new folk-singer/songwriter album of the year), and critically acclaimed lyricist Julie Flanders, to name a few. Ms. Lieberman is an improvising violinist/singer, composer, recording artist, journalist, educator, and the author of nine books and six instructional DVDs. A dynamic, participatory workshop leader, her ability to stimulate participants to think and grow in new ways has earned respect for her work throughout the world. In addition to currently teaching improvisation at Juilliard, she has presented for organizations like Music Educators Association, International Association of Jazz Educators, the Juilliard MAP Program, Carnegie/Weill Hall/Juilliard's The Academy, National Young Audiences, and the Carnegie Hall LinkUp. Lieberman is a J. D'Addario Elite Clinician. Alfred Publishing publishes her scores.
  23. Vocal Aerobics: Essentials for Today's Singers with Julie Lyonn Lieberman Running Time and Format: 60-minute instructional DVD Distributed by: Hal Leonard Corporation (7777 W. Bluemound Rd. Milwaukee, WI 53213, 800-637-2852, http://www.halleonard.com /) to bookstores, music stores and schools through the world) Release Date: September 30, 2008 Description: World-renowned music educator, Julie Lyonn Lieberman, has created an instructional DVD for singers. Her practice system focuses on cognitive illumination and muscular facility. This system can help develop a vibrating palette that communicates spirit, emotion, and viewpoint all riding effortlessly on the breath. It is supported by science yet connected to individuality. By first guiding the exercises in silence, her intent is to prevent the tension and misuse that often occur when the main impetus for the creation of musical sound is fueled by a brew of yearning and fear mixed with a fixation on the end product. Topics covered include: Section I Introduction, Creating a Cathedral, Breath Anatomy Section II Aerobicizing the Tongue, Mobilizing the Lips Section III Balancing the non-dominant side of the mouth, Posture, The Power of Imagery, Warming Up and Warming Down, Vocal Health Ms. Lieberman trusts the innate intelligence of the client by making sure that they understand how and why each region of their vocal anatomy works the way it does. Through extensive experience teaching, she has developed ergonomically based exercises that are fulcrum triggers: they get the job done more efficiently and faster. Lieberman has discovered that when the lights are turned on and the equipment is illuminated, epiphanies abound and can continue to be generated by the singer, long after the teacher leaves the room. In-depth studies while writing her critically acclaimed book. You Are Your Instrument, followed by her three spin-off DVDs (The Vocalist's Guide to Fitness, Health and Musicianship, The Instrumentalist's Guide to Fitness, Health and Musicianship, and The Violin in Motion) place a unique spin on this body of work. Most voice teachers use exercises that are effective in the long run or they would be put out of business, but the older model for mentorship entailed I do and do as I say approach. It was a faith-based relationship; the student was expected to blindly follow the teacher's directions without specifics, context, or adequate rapport with the musculature required to do the job smoothly and consciously. The belief behind that style of work was that if you repeated each exercise enough times (often while inadvertently thinking about something else), that it would help you sing better. This is the long, slow train to success. Julie believes that it's time to replace unconscious repetition with less activity, more awareness, and targeted control. She will help you convert the butcher's knife into a laser beam! To Order: see JulieLyonn.com and click on Vocalist's Corner About the author Julie Lyonn Lieberman (JulieLyonn.com) has specialized in working with creative vocalists in her NYC music studio over the last 3 decades. Her students have included artists such as Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter Vanessa Carlton, Grammy-nominated Putnam Murdock, Indie music award winner Kara Suzanne (best new folk-singer/songwriter album of the year), and critically acclaimed lyricist Julie Flanders, to name a few. Ms. Lieberman is an improvising violinist/singer, composer, recording artist, journalist, educator, and the author of nine books and six instructional DVDs. A dynamic, participatory workshop leader, her ability to stimulate participants to think and grow in new ways has earned respect for her work throughout the world. In addition to currently teaching improvisation at Juilliard, she has presented for organizations like Music Educators Association, International Association of Jazz Educators, the Juilliard MAP Program, Carnegie/Weill Hall/Juilliard's The Academy, National Young Audiences, and the Carnegie Hall LinkUp. Lieberman is a J. D'Addario Elite Clinician. Alfred Publishing publishes her scores. View full articles
  24. Hello All: I thought that since I have not seen much on TMV regarding SLS or Speech Level Singing, which is the technique pioneered and taught by the master vocal teacher and one of my greatest teachers ever, Seth Riggs, I would post an introduction to the principles of SLS for everyone to read and learn from. Introduction to Speech Level Singing Overview Speech Level Singing is not new. It is a technique devised and originated by Seth Riggs of Los Angeles, California that has produced over 100 Grammy winners and many Metropolitan Opera winners. Seth Riggs is the most renowned voice teacher and vocal technician in the industry of performing arts and teaches around the world. Some names of famous singers who use this technique are Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder, Luther Vandross, Madonna, Janet Jackson, Bryan Adams, Michael Bolton, Janet Jackson, Bonnie Raitt, Ricky Martin, Julie Andrews, Connie Stevens, Bernedette Peters, Natalie Cole and many, many others who are in the singing industry today. Some of the groups who have worked with SLS are Kiss, The Eurythmics, Chicago, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Aerosmith, etc. Speech Level Singing is a technique that allows a person to sing with a "free voice." The only muscles that are engaged when singing with this technique are the muscles attached to the vocal cords, inside the voice box (larynx), i.e., the muscles of speech, as well as keeping the larynx at the level of speech production, hence the term "Speech Level Singing." It allows you to sing freely and clearly anywhere in your range with all your words clearly understood. Since you are not learning what to sing but rather HOW to sing, you can apply this technique to ANY type of music. Simply put, Speech Level Singing states that if the larynx stays down and the vocal cords stay together from the very bottom of the vocal range to the very top everything is fine. This also applies to all vowel and consonant combinations through out any phrase. If at any point the larynx jumps up or down or the tone becomes breathy then there is something wrong with the vocal process. The larynx is the big bump in the middle of the neck just below the chin. This houses the vocal cords and controls the process of swallowing. When the larynx moves up, the muscles around the cords act as a sphincter and closes so as to prevent swallowing down the windpipe and into the lungs. This is a very important process when you need to swallow, but it is a very poor process when you are trying to sing. If you place your hand on your larynx and yawn, you will find that you can bring your larynx down as well. This is a good way to learn what it feels like to have the larynx stay down. The end goal here is to be able to keep the larynx from moving too far down as well as too far up. It should stay in a fairly stable and speech level position as you ascend and descend. This is a very brief and condensed version of SLS, there is obviously a lot more to it. But, to give you an idea of what is correct, take these two ideas and while you are singing, monitor them. See if you can keep your larynx stable and your cords together. You will probably find that there is a certain area of your voice that is easy for you to accomplish this, and certain points of your voice that are more difficult. These harder areas are called bridges. Breathing Breathing for singing is a very relaxed process. When it is said that you can regulate it, what is meant is that you allow it to happen so that inhalation and exhalation are done in a way that best suits your musical needs. You do not have to work at breathing correctly unless you have poor posture or a tendency to raise your chest and shoulders and take shallow breaths. Your diaphragm, rib muscles and abdominal muscles are already strong enough for your needs as a singer. If you maintain good posture when you sing, and are careful not to let your chest collapse as you exhale, your diaphragm is able to move freely and be regulated by your abdominal muscles automatically. There is no need to consciously exert tension in those muscles. If you do try to directly control your breathing muscles when you sing, the extra tension in your body will only cause your vocal cords to overtense and jam up. Very little air is required to produce a good tone. Even for a loud tone, the amount of air you use need only be enough to support the vibration of your vocal cords no more, no less so that your tone is produced without any effort or strain. Just as trying to control your breathing muscles directly will cause your vocal cords to jam up, so will using too much air. That's because when you sing, your cords are instinctively committed to holding back (or at least trying to hold back) any amount of air you send their way. And the more air you send them, the tighter your cords have to get to hold it back. Also, this is when the outer muscles around your larynx will assist the cords by pulling on and tightening around your larynx in order to hold back the excess of air blasted at your cords. You know you have proper breath support when there is a balance between air and muscle. There will be a mutual and simultaneous coordination of the proper amount of air with the proper adjustment of your vocal cords. Bridges A bridge is a spot where resonation shifts from one area of your body to another (for example, from your chest to your head). Another term for a bridge is the Italian word for passage, passagie (passagio when plural). When you hear the word passagie, you are hearing a reference to a bridge. Knowing where your bridges are can really help you smooth out the resonation from one area of your body to the next. Bridges take place in different spots for men and women, but they are fairly universal within a gender. We will deal with four areas of resonation: the first is chest voice, the second is mix voice, the third is head voice, and the final is super head voice. All combine to create ONE FULL VOICE. Men's Bridges Men, with the exception of basses or dramatic baritones, start their first bridge at E-flat above a keyboard's middle C. This is the first note in the mixing or blending area of the voice (a blend of chest voice and head voice), and each chromatic move up will transition the voice toward a headier position and sound. The male vocalist will not feel completely in his head voice until an A or B-flat. This is where the second bridge is. This second bridge goes from A or B-flat above a keyboard's middle C to D above the keyboard's high C. Women's Bridges Women's bridges are similar to men's: they exist within approximately an augmented 4th interval. But they begin where a man's second bridge is. So, generally speaking, a woman's first bridge is on a A or B flat above the keyboard middle C. Below this is a woman's chest voice, and above this, up to a D, is mix voice. Once a female vocalist hits an E-flat (or sometimes an E), she is in head voice. Strictly on a technical level, a woman shouldn't sing completely in head voice until an E-flat. This area of resonation will continue up to an A or B-flat below a keyboard's double-high C. This third bridge puts the female singer in a super head voice, and she will stay in that until she reaches an E-flat above a keyboard's double-high C. When singing most songs, women don't need to go much past this fourth bridge, but there are a few more bridges beyond this fourth bridge. Once again, they are at intervals of an augmented fourth above the E-flat above a keyboard's double high C: the fifth bridge is on A, and the sixth is on the E-flat above that. These last two areas of resonation are known as the whistle range, and as I stated, most women don't use these areas, but they do exist and can be developed. Crossing Bridges You may have heard about vocal-cord adduction and the need to develop good cord closure. It is essential that the vocal cords stay together as a singer crosses the bridges. Your first bridge is the most critical. It's where the outer muscles (if they haven't done so already) are most likely to enter into the adjustment process. When they do, they pull on and tighten around the outside of the larynx in an effort to stretch the vocal cords to get the necessary tension for the pitch or volume level you require. Stretching your cords in this manner causes your entire singing mechanism tone and words to jam up! Fortunately, there is an easier and much better way to stretch your vocal cords to achieve the necessary tensions without disrupting your tone-making process or your word-making process. The key is to do less in order to do more. To be specific, the higher you sing, the less air you should use. When you reduce the amount of air you send to your vocal cords, you make it possible for the muscles inside your larynx to stretch your vocal cords by themselves. Your outer muscles are less likely to interfere because there isn't as much air to hold back. Your outer muscles will interfere in the vibration process whenever you use more air than your vocal cords and the other muscles inside your larynx are able to handle. As the pitch ascends, sound traveling from the vocal cords shifts paths. Chest voice travels to the hard palate and out of the mouth. As the pitch rises and goes over the first bridge, the sound begins to split, going behind the soft palate as well as to the hard palate. This is a balancing act of sorts. If too much sound is traveling in front of the soft palate and out of the mouth, the result will be a wide vowel and what is called pulled chest. A residual result will be a high larynx. The right balance depends on which note within the mix is being sung. By the time you're completely in head voice, much of the sound will be traveling behind the soft palate before exiting the skull. Each time a singer reaches a bridge, more sound must pass behind the soft palate and more resonation within the skull should take place. Singers resist letting sound pass behind the soft palate for a couple of reasons: The first is that they hear the tone bouncing within the skull and feel that it sounds too ringy. They don't realize that the sound they're hearing is not what the audience is hearing. They're picking up this sound through the skull, not from within the room they're singing in. One way to deal with this is to record yourself passing into mix and head voice; then play back what you've recorded. You will hear the difference between how you really sounded and the sound you heard resonating in your head. The second reason for resistance is that many singers get used to feeling that they have to muscle notes. As you learn to master the bridges, you'll feel very little pressure. There is compression from the diaphragm and resistance from the cords being held together, but there will not be any tightness in the neck or under the chin. This lack of pressure can be unfamiliar and uncomfortable for many singers and even feel a bit precarious, especially if the strength in the mix is not quite there. Once again, recording an arpeggio that ascends into the head voice and playing it back can shed some light on the relationship between what a certain note sounds like and what it should feel like as you sing it.
  25. Hello All: I thought that since I have not seen much on TMV regarding SLS or Speech Level Singing, which is the technique pioneered and taught by the master vocal teacher and one of my greatest teachers ever, Seth Riggs, I would post an introduction to the principles of SLS for everyone to read and learn from. Introduction to Speech Level Singing Overview Speech Level Singing is not new. It is a technique devised and originated by Seth Riggs of Los Angeles, California that has produced over 100 Grammy winners and many Metropolitan Opera winners. Seth Riggs is the most renowned voice teacher and vocal technician in the industry of performing arts and teaches around the world. Some names of famous singers who use this technique are Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder, Luther Vandross, Madonna, Janet Jackson, Bryan Adams, Michael Bolton, Janet Jackson, Bonnie Raitt, Ricky Martin, Julie Andrews, Connie Stevens, Bernedette Peters, Natalie Cole and many, many others who are in the singing industry today. Some of the groups who have worked with SLS are Kiss, The Eurythmics, Chicago, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Aerosmith, etc. Speech Level Singing is a technique that allows a person to sing with a "free voice." The only muscles that are engaged when singing with this technique are the muscles attached to the vocal cords, inside the voice box (larynx), i.e., the muscles of speech, as well as keeping the larynx at the level of speech production, hence the term "Speech Level Singing." It allows you to sing freely and clearly anywhere in your range with all your words clearly understood. Since you are not learning what to sing but rather HOW to sing, you can apply this technique to ANY type of music. Simply put, Speech Level Singing states that if the larynx stays down and the vocal cords stay together from the very bottom of the vocal range to the very top everything is fine. This also applies to all vowel and consonant combinations through out any phrase. If at any point the larynx jumps up or down or the tone becomes breathy then there is something wrong with the vocal process. The larynx is the big bump in the middle of the neck just below the chin. This houses the vocal cords and controls the process of swallowing. When the larynx moves up, the muscles around the cords act as a sphincter and closes so as to prevent swallowing down the windpipe and into the lungs. This is a very important process when you need to swallow, but it is a very poor process when you are trying to sing. If you place your hand on your larynx and yawn, you will find that you can bring your larynx down as well. This is a good way to learn what it feels like to have the larynx stay down. The end goal here is to be able to keep the larynx from moving too far down as well as too far up. It should stay in a fairly stable and speech level position as you ascend and descend. This is a very brief and condensed version of SLS, there is obviously a lot more to it. But, to give you an idea of what is correct, take these two ideas and while you are singing, monitor them. See if you can keep your larynx stable and your cords together. You will probably find that there is a certain area of your voice that is easy for you to accomplish this, and certain points of your voice that are more difficult. These harder areas are called bridges. Breathing Breathing for singing is a very relaxed process. When it is said that you can regulate it, what is meant is that you allow it to happen so that inhalation and exhalation are done in a way that best suits your musical needs. You do not have to work at breathing correctly unless you have poor posture or a tendency to raise your chest and shoulders and take shallow breaths. Your diaphragm, rib muscles and abdominal muscles are already strong enough for your needs as a singer. If you maintain good posture when you sing, and are careful not to let your chest collapse as you exhale, your diaphragm is able to move freely and be regulated by your abdominal muscles automatically. There is no need to consciously exert tension in those muscles. If you do try to directly control your breathing muscles when you sing, the extra tension in your body will only cause your vocal cords to overtense and jam up. Very little air is required to produce a good tone. Even for a loud tone, the amount of air you use need only be enough to support the vibration of your vocal cords no more, no less so that your tone is produced without any effort or strain. Just as trying to control your breathing muscles directly will cause your vocal cords to jam up, so will using too much air. That's because when you sing, your cords are instinctively committed to holding back (or at least trying to hold back) any amount of air you send their way. And the more air you send them, the tighter your cords have to get to hold it back. Also, this is when the outer muscles around your larynx will assist the cords by pulling on and tightening around your larynx in order to hold back the excess of air blasted at your cords. You know you have proper breath support when there is a balance between air and muscle. There will be a mutual and simultaneous coordination of the proper amount of air with the proper adjustment of your vocal cords. Bridges A bridge is a spot where resonation shifts from one area of your body to another (for example, from your chest to your head). Another term for a bridge is the Italian word for passage, passagie (passagio when plural). When you hear the word passagie, you are hearing a reference to a bridge. Knowing where your bridges are can really help you smooth out the resonation from one area of your body to the next. Bridges take place in different spots for men and women, but they are fairly universal within a gender. We will deal with four areas of resonation: the first is chest voice, the second is mix voice, the third is head voice, and the final is super head voice. All combine to create ONE FULL VOICE. Men's Bridges Men, with the exception of basses or dramatic baritones, start their first bridge at E-flat above a keyboard's middle C. This is the first note in the mixing or blending area of the voice (a blend of chest voice and head voice), and each chromatic move up will transition the voice toward a headier position and sound. The male vocalist will not feel completely in his head voice until an A or B-flat. This is where the second bridge is. This second bridge goes from A or B-flat above a keyboard's middle C to D above the keyboard's high C. Women's Bridges Women's bridges are similar to men's: they exist within approximately an augmented 4th interval. But they begin where a man's second bridge is. So, generally speaking, a woman's first bridge is on a A or B flat above the keyboard middle C. Below this is a woman's chest voice, and above this, up to a D, is mix voice. Once a female vocalist hits an E-flat (or sometimes an E), she is in head voice. Strictly on a technical level, a woman shouldn't sing completely in head voice until an E-flat. This area of resonation will continue up to an A or B-flat below a keyboard's double-high C. This third bridge puts the female singer in a super head voice, and she will stay in that until she reaches an E-flat above a keyboard's double-high C. When singing most songs, women don't need to go much past this fourth bridge, but there are a few more bridges beyond this fourth bridge. Once again, they are at intervals of an augmented fourth above the E-flat above a keyboard's double high C: the fifth bridge is on A, and the sixth is on the E-flat above that. These last two areas of resonation are known as the whistle range, and as I stated, most women don't use these areas, but they do exist and can be developed. Crossing Bridges You may have heard about vocal-cord adduction and the need to develop good cord closure. It is essential that the vocal cords stay together as a singer crosses the bridges. Your first bridge is the most critical. It's where the outer muscles (if they haven't done so already) are most likely to enter into the adjustment process. When they do, they pull on and tighten around the outside of the larynx in an effort to stretch the vocal cords to get the necessary tension for the pitch or volume level you require. Stretching your cords in this manner causes your entire singing mechanism tone and words to jam up! Fortunately, there is an easier and much better way to stretch your vocal cords to achieve the necessary tensions without disrupting your tone-making process or your word-making process. The key is to do less in order to do more. To be specific, the higher you sing, the less air you should use. When you reduce the amount of air you send to your vocal cords, you make it possible for the muscles inside your larynx to stretch your vocal cords by themselves. Your outer muscles are less likely to interfere because there isn't as much air to hold back. Your outer muscles will interfere in the vibration process whenever you use more air than your vocal cords and the other muscles inside your larynx are able to handle. As the pitch ascends, sound traveling from the vocal cords shifts paths. Chest voice travels to the hard palate and out of the mouth. As the pitch rises and goes over the first bridge, the sound begins to split, going behind the soft palate as well as to the hard palate. This is a balancing act of sorts. If too much sound is traveling in front of the soft palate and out of the mouth, the result will be a wide vowel and what is called pulled chest. A residual result will be a high larynx. The right balance depends on which note within the mix is being sung. By the time you're completely in head voice, much of the sound will be traveling behind the soft palate before exiting the skull. Each time a singer reaches a bridge, more sound must pass behind the soft palate and more resonation within the skull should take place. Singers resist letting sound pass behind the soft palate for a couple of reasons: The first is that they hear the tone bouncing within the skull and feel that it sounds too ringy. They don't realize that the sound they're hearing is not what the audience is hearing. They're picking up this sound through the skull, not from within the room they're singing in. One way to deal with this is to record yourself passing into mix and head voice; then play back what you've recorded. You will hear the difference between how you really sounded and the sound you heard resonating in your head. The second reason for resistance is that many singers get used to feeling that they have to muscle notes. As you learn to master the bridges, you'll feel very little pressure. There is compression from the diaphragm and resistance from the cords being held together, but there will not be any tightness in the neck or under the chin. This lack of pressure can be unfamiliar and uncomfortable for many singers and even feel a bit precarious, especially if the strength in the mix is not quite there. Once again, recording an arpeggio that ascends into the head voice and playing it back can shed some light on the relationship between what a certain note sounds like and what it should feel like as you sing it. View full articles