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  1. The term Muscle Tension Dysphonia is a general term which could be associated with an imbalance in the muscle’s coordination and breathing patterns required to create a voice. Muscle Tension Dysphonia (often called MTD) may occur on its own, or as a result of a strained voice being pulled into the neck muscles. The reason behind this disorder is not always clear. It may be triggered by allergies, illness, acid reflux or whichever other means... Symptoms - The most common symptoms for this disorder is a change in voice quality, often associated with discomfort of the vocal cords (or voice box) while speaking or singing. Also, almost always, symptoms like hoarseness and rapines will be associated with an increased effort to talk or sing, coupled with subsequent fatigue during continuous voice use. Treatment - There is an alternative form of voice therapy which is the gold standard for the treatment of Muscle Tension Dysphonia. There are no other known treatments (outside of the Vocal Science™ Method and Technique) that can restore the muscle balance in the vocal mechanism. With that said, this unique form of therapy will help alleviate the above vocal symptoms. Ms. Diana Yampolsky is one of the world's foremost specialists on the topic of the human voice and is the creator of Vocal Science(TM), a unique and truly revolutionary accelerated vocal development technique. It is a holistic and scientific approach to voice mechanics that enables all singers and speakers to reach their full potential in an extremely short period of time. Based in Ontario, Canada, Diana works with a worldwide spectrum of clientele as a Vocal Coach/Consultant, In-Studio Vocal Production Expert and Non-Surgical Voice Repair Specialist.If you feel that you, or a loved one, may be suffering from such voice disorders like Spasmodic Dysphonia, contact us: info@vocalscience.com | 416-857-8741 View full articles
  2. Ms. Diana Yampolsky is one of the world's foremost specialists on the topic of the human voice and is the creator of Vocal Science(TM), a unique and truly revolutionary accelerated vocal development technique. It is a holistic and scientific approach to voice mechanics that enables all singers and speakers to reach their full potential in an extremely short period of time. Based in Ontario, Canada, Diana works with a worldwide spectrum of clientele as a Vocal Coach/Consultant, In-Studio Vocal Production Expert and Non-Surgical Voice Repair Specialist.If you feel that you, or a loved one, may be suffering from such voice disorders like Spasmodic Dysphonia, contact us: info@vocalscience.com | 416-857-8741
  3. Ruth Alexis Jack

    Have I damaged my voice?

    Hey guys, I'm new to the site. I am really worried about my vocal health. I have just graduated uni after years of specialising in vocals and two months ago I began my first proper singing contract in a different country. Because of the change in climate I got ill and ended up with laryngitis. Unfortunately I still had to sing and do shows with laryngitis, however, I had to almost scream to get a sound out. My voice kept getting worse and the laryngitis developed into pharyngitis and guess what... I still had to sing every night. No voice rest for me It has now been two months and although I do proper warm ups before my shows, afterwards my voice is gone because of the amount of strain I am putting on it. I still have to shout to get the notes out and I cannot sing effortlessly like I used to. I'm getting so fed up of it. I live with other singers and I feel unworthy to join in with their songs because my voice sounds so bad compared to what it used to be like. The other singers in my company must think I'm talentless. I just want my voice back. I cannot do runs clearly; it sounds like I am sliding around the notes and my head voice is completely non existent. I know now I should see a voice therapist but finding an English speaking one may be difficult out here. Does anyone have any advice on remedies or exercises that will help me get my voice back? Almost importantly, do you think I have permanently damaged my voice?
  4. Okay, so to get started i believe i've had articulation problems my whole life, I couldn't speak fast at all, and my voice was somewhat hoarse. Often, people would ask me to repeat myself as my voice wasn't clear. I found that when I went on a ginger/lemon fast( for about 4 days), that my voice was ever so smooth! I could articulate my words perfectly, and speaking was no longer a problem. My singing voice got way better too. I've been trying to replicate this feeling by fasting, drinking lots of water... etc, and I can't seem to get the same effect. I think I might have chronic sinusitis, and was wondering if anyone had similar problems with articulation...etc I've googled it and I can't seem to find anyone in the same dilemma as me -> or is atleast aware of this dilemma.
  5. SaddenedSinger

    Injured Vocal cords. Help!

    Hello! When I was around 12, I was pushing my voice quite hard. I had choir, vocal lesson, and practiced as much as I possibly could. I was singing classical and Broadway songs ( "Per la gloria d'adorarvi" or "Who will buy" as a couple examples). I had the odd fascination of "how high of notes can I hit?" I don't believe I was ever overly reckless, but Lo and behold, my voice started feeling strained and tight, and I had to work harder and harder to produce sound. Eventually, there was no sound with the exception of a breathy whisper. After a few weeks of this, I went to have my voice looked at at the ENT, and they couldn't see much of anything, except redness and slight swelling. There was no certain diagnoses. Finally, around six months after me first losing my voice, I could speak fine, and sort of sing. It has been a few years since. My chest voice is still weak and shaky, and it cracks, breaks, and will occasionally leave me without a voice for a couple days. I miss singing though, and more specifically, I miss singing well. I don't know what to do. Could I have just badly strained my vocal cords? Would it have caused that much damage? Could that happen again? Should I try vocal therapy? I have no clue where to begin, or if I should just accept this and move on. Thank you for any help you can give me!
  6. Hi everyone, new member here. I am a female singer who has been diagnosed with a severe underbite and TMJ with neck stiffness. This diagnosis has been pretty devastating to my confidence, given that I am not a trained singer and have only been doing this for about 3 years (I'm 20). I have recorded quite a bit of music, mostly originals in the style of punk rock, and I can't help but think that my severe underbite coupled with the loud style of singing that I have grown accustomed to is to blame for my TMJ. At the moment, I am seeking treatment to correct my bite via jaw surgery, but it will not be completely fixed for another year to 2 years. Until then, I need some tips on how to overcome this problem so that I can start gigging live and avoid the pain/burning sensation that I get when I sing. Has anyone had a similar experience?
  7. Rlynnclifford

    Vocal fold hemorrhage

    Hello, I am having a serious and rather uncommon vocal issue and I was wondering if someone could shed some light on the situation. In early May of this year, I was very, very careless with my voice. I had always sung through basically blunt force trauma, but my voice had always rebounded- except this time, it didn't. For months I had pain after speaking , loss of range and projection problems. Finally, I was diagnosed with a hemorrhage of the false vocal folds. I was told it wasn't permanent, and put on modified, not total, vocal rest. From what I understand, true vocal fold hemorrhages are extremely serious...but I can find no information about false vocal fold hemorrhage. It's been about a month and I'm still having problems with all of this, if not worse problems. My concern is, what role do false vocal folds play in speaking/singing? If it's just a false hemorrhage, wouldn't that have a minimal effect on my speaking voice and vocal range? I often get hoarse as well. I'm very concerned with scarring and permanent changes.
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    Joanna Cazden, MFA, MS-CCC, is a speech pathologist specializing in voice rehabilitation and a respected advocate for holistic, multi-disciplinary voice care. Joanna offers private services in voice rehabilitation and training, workshops and master classes for voice students, and seminars for speech pathologists and vocal arts teachers. Joanna also sees voice patients by medical referral at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center's outpatient Voice program. Helping to found this program in 2001, she has treated well-known pop singers, actors, broadcasters, and musical-theater artists. She was a clinical instructor for ten years at California State University, Northridge (CSUN), and has presented scholarly papers at major voice conferences in the USA UK, and Mexico. In 2004 she was named a Fellow of the California Speech and Hearing Association, an award that honors excellence in clinical service, teaching, and community service. Joanna released six solo albums between 1973 and 1997; her first album, The Greatest Illusion (1973), has been re-released internationally. In 2000 she joined Pete Seeger and other folk luminaries on "Folksongs of the Catskills," an ensemble CD later featured at the Library of Congress. She organized the first panel on Health Issues for folk performers, at the 1992 Folk Alliance Conference, and has won numersous singing and songwriting awards. Joanna studied voice with Ellalou Dimmock, Natalie Lemonick, and Jan Pederson. She holds a BA in Drama from the University of Washington, an MFA in Acting from CalArts, and an MS in Communication Disorders and Sciences from CSUN. In 2006 she was certified by Catherine Fitzmaurice as an Associate Teacher of Fitzmaurice Voicework. In addition to her expertise in voice, Joanna is an advanced practitioner of the Reiki and Theta healing systems, and a longtime student of yoga, meditation, and bodywork. These tools are integrated into her voice and speech services according to the individual's interest and needs. Joanna Cazden www.VoiceofYourLife.com

    Free

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    4 downloads

    Ingo R. Titze is a vocal scientist and executive director of the National Center for Voice and Speech at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. He is a professor at the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Iowa and has written several books relating to the human voice. He is considered to be one of the world's leading experts on vocal research. Dr. Ingo Titze www.NCVS.org

    Free

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    Robert Thayer Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS is the Executive director of The Voice Foundation. The World's leading association for research regarding the human voice. He is also professor and chair, at the Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery and senior associate dean for clinical academic specialties, Drexel University College of Medicine. He is also adjunct professor in the Departments of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery at Thomas Jefferson University, the University of Pennsylvania and Temple University, and is on the faculty of the Academy of Vocal Arts. He served as conductor of the Thomas Jefferson University Choir for nearly four decades. Dr. Robert Sataloff www.VoiceFoundation.org

    Free

  11. Kevin Ashe

    Vocal Coach Poll

    Hey all you coaches! I'm very curious as a possible vocal coach in the making, just what your coaching experience looks like these days. These questions assume a student who is dedicated to the home training you prescribe. Thanks for sharing!
  12. Hello everyone I apologize in advance if this question has been asked already. In April of this year I woke up with a sore throat. Later that day, I realized I could no longer sing. I could speak just fine, but I couldn't even form a note. I had an ENT appt a week later which confirmed, with taking a look down my throat, that I had LPR. I was given omeperazole. A month later I had another ENT appt, and another look down my throat. The doc said my vocal cords still look swollen. He now says it can be a mixture of LPR and allergies. I am no longer on the omeperazole because I had bad side effects from it. I do take allergy meds (i've been on them for years) and I brought a wedged pillow to sleep on so that I am elevated. I also do no eat 3 hrs before bed, and I take DGL licorice before bed. I have no other refulx or LPR symptoms other than I still cannot sing the way I could before. Two months later, and I can sing lower notes, but my higher range is non existent. I'm not sure if i'm getting better, or if I am already better and just lost my higher range. I had the ph test done and am waiting for results. Because of the lack of LPR and reflux symptoms the docs are not sure if I even have LPR or if that was just a one time thing. My question is, Is it normal for the vocal cords to take so long to heal? Is there still hope for my voice? Also, is there anything I can do to help with healing my voice? Thanx for any help
  13. Step 1. · Identify the vocal problem itself in order to get your voice back. Perhaps, you have noticed that your voice (Speaking and/or singing) is not working in the same capacity as it once was. Obviously you are puzzled and concerned. At this point, you have to come to terms that something is not the same and begin to accept that fact. Step 1. · Identify the vocal problem itself in order to get your voice back. Perhaps, you have noticed that your voice (Speaking and/or singing) is not working in the same capacity as it once was. Obviously you are puzzled and concerned. At this point, you have to come to terms that something is not the same and begin to accept that fact. Step 2. · Identify the cause of such occurrence. Please try to analyze what could have caused your voice problem in the first place. Please try to “rewind” all the possible facts, which could have lead to such an ordeal. You might think of any medical/surgical procedures you might have undergone in the not very distant past. You might think of a ball game you might have attended with your kids, or a concert of your Idol singing. In this instance, you would possibly be able to recall how excited you were then, during the events, & how loud you were cheering for the performers in the field. Also, it probably would not hurt to look at your personal relationship with your spouse and your children. Have you been shouting a lot lately? Have you, perhaps, been under a lot of stress at work and/or at home? All of the above factors (and many others) could easily aid to a voice problem. When you are in the moment, you are not paying attention how loud you speak or scream. The consequences will haunt you later. Step 3. · Do not ‘sugarcoat’ your feelings; rather, embrace it with a grain of sault. That alone will help you immensely to get your voice back in a fast and efficient manner. When you start experiencing some changes in your voice, please DO NOT pretend that nothing happened and do not convince yourself that it is just temporary and you will feel better tomorrow. Unfortunately, you might not feel better tomorrow, as the damage has already been done and it will not go away on its own. It might require some further investigation and medical (or alternative) assistance. Step 4. · Outline your goal for the best possible recovery of your vocal problem and enjoy getting there. Once you are able to face the fact that you do have a vocal problem, please embrace this fact and outline the goal to get your voice back. It might, not necessarily, be an easy road, but please try to enjoy the process towards achieving your main goal – getting your voice back. View full articles
  14. Step 1. · Identify the vocal problem itself in order to get your voice back. Perhaps, you have noticed that your voice (Speaking and/or singing) is not working in the same capacity as it once was. Obviously you are puzzled and concerned. At this point, you have to come to terms that something is not the same and begin to accept that fact. Step 2. · Identify the cause of such occurrence. Please try to analyze what could have caused your voice problem in the first place. Please try to “rewind” all the possible facts, which could have lead to such an ordeal. You might think of any medical/surgical procedures you might have undergone in the not very distant past. You might think of a ball game you might have attended with your kids, or a concert of your Idol singing. In this instance, you would possibly be able to recall how excited you were then, during the events, & how loud you were cheering for the performers in the field. Also, it probably would not hurt to look at your personal relationship with your spouse and your children. Have you been shouting a lot lately? Have you, perhaps, been under a lot of stress at work and/or at home? All of the above factors (and many others) could easily aid to a voice problem. When you are in the moment, you are not paying attention how loud you speak or scream. The consequences will haunt you later. Step 3. · Do not ‘sugarcoat’ your feelings; rather, embrace it with a grain of sault. That alone will help you immensely to get your voice back in a fast and efficient manner. When you start experiencing some changes in your voice, please DO NOT pretend that nothing happened and do not convince yourself that it is just temporary and you will feel better tomorrow. Unfortunately, you might not feel better tomorrow, as the damage has already been done and it will not go away on its own. It might require some further investigation and medical (or alternative) assistance. Step 4. · Outline your goal for the best possible recovery of your vocal problem and enjoy getting there. Once you are able to face the fact that you do have a vocal problem, please embrace this fact and outline the goal to get your voice back. It might, not necessarily, be an easy road, but please try to enjoy the process towards achieving your main goal – getting your voice back.
  15. I just got Invisalign braces. So now I have a bit of lisp when I talk, and thus, also when I sing. It's mostly only with "s" type sounds - otherwise I sound pretty normal. But when I say/sing anything with an "s" I sound like I have quite a speech impediment. They're Invisalign, which means I can take them out when I eat and brush and such. I figure when I'm playing live gigs I'll take them out since it wouldn't be for that long. But when I'm just practicing singing, or recording, I can't just leave them out for several hours. And I'd still like to be able to talk normally. Does anyone have any tips on getting rid of this lisp, or at least making it less noticeable? I'm a bit self-conscious of it, and I can't record my new songs until I get it under control.
  16. Three and half years ago I decided I wanted to have a deeper voice. I did some research and found an article that suggested saying your ABC's in a deeper voice everyday until your voice became that pitch. THIS WAS A HUGE MISTAKE. It has massively hurt my communication skills and left me sounding very unnatural and unpleasant . After years of trying to correct it by speaking my way back to my naturally voice, going through phases of pain and scratchiness, I think it's as good as it can be without some help from people who know what their doing. I'm coming to this great community for advice on how to get back to my original voice and get on sounding the way I was meant to sound! Sincerely- RecoveringFromTheDeep
  17. VocalScience

    Vocal Injury

    Vocal Injury: The pain could be inevitable, but the suffering should be optional. Like many of my other clients, Karen lived with her voice disorder for almost two decades. She had seen many medical professionals, alternative doctors, and nevertheless, speech therapists. To all of them, she had been complaining about the pain in her throat, her neck and her shoulder, evidently associated with that. Practically all of them told her that it is all in her head. Only one of the specialists was able to diagnose her with muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), but like everybody else, he was not able to administrate any kind of treatment which would help Karen to get rid of her nagging pain while speaking. Needless to say, she was devastated and practically was ready to give up on life. She is a very vibrant and boisterous person who loves to talk a lot. Some of the so-called medical professionals ordered her to keep silent for six months!! Needless to say, I had quite a few cases like Karen's in the past. In brings out the memory of my former client, George L., a real estate agent from Los Angeles, California, who went through the similar ordeal. Nobody could tell him also what was wrong with him and every treatment George took around the world would make his sufferings with his voice worse than before. And he needed to speak for a living! Twenty minutes into my first session, George had tears in his eyes and said to me, I'm honored to be in the same room with such a specialist like you.Four days later, George left very happy with his voice completely recovered. The fact is, that from the medical doctor and the alternative practitioners point of view, there is nothing wrong with such patients like my two clients described above. Why, you, my reader, may ask? Because the problem, one more time again, is mechanical. None of the doctors know how to fix the mechanics of voice, i.e. recover it from the neck and chest muscles; structure it and place it in the sinus (facial) cavities; and how to create the support of the sound from the lower and upper abdominal muscles; and how to integrate and synchronize those muscles to work simultaneously with each other. The description of the Vocal Science Method is such that it requires the synchronicity and synergy between mental, physical, emotional and vocal components. If that doesn't happen, the voice repair will never be accomplished. If that wholesome mechanism which allows the voice to work in its fullest capacity possible with no pain or strain on the vocal anatomy is not established, the voice, speaking or singing, will never have a healthy sound and always will be prone to some kind of injury. With that mechanism in place, the speaker or singer will also be able to comply with standards of professional speaking or singing, and nevertheless, preserve their recovered voices for their lifetime.
  18. Hi all, This is my first post in this board so I hope it will go ok. My main problem is with speaking. I'm a computer programmer so I don't talk that much during the day, but when I do sometimes it becomes realy difficult and I have to say every sentence twice or three times because people keep asking me "What?", so that's basically why I'm posting this here, in hope someone may enlighten me. My problem is with speaking, not singing. As far as singing - after a proper warm up, I can sing songs like "Radio Ga Ga" by Queen or "Man In The Mirror" by Michael Jackson almost easily, and they are using some high notes in them. My problem is not in the high notes, but in the lower notes where my speech is at. Now, there are some occasions where my speech suddenly becomes easy and flawless, I noticed that it happends in the following 2 cases: 1. If I went to a night club, or somewhere where I need to talk loudly to be heard. Then after I get out of it, my voice becomes heard, and easy to speak for about 2 days (after 2 days my voice goes back to the quiet / unheard speech). 2. If I talk on the phone with a friend, then after about 30-40 minutes of speaking my voice will start to connect more easily and then I'll stop struggling. I went to an ENT doctor for diagnosis about 3 years ago and he said I have "bowed vocal cords" and recommended speech therapy, but it didnt realy help me that much: they said that my problem is that I dont have enough "breath support" and gave me all kinds of exercises that work on breath support, which eventually made it even more difficult for me to speak and got me tired even faster. I did some research of my own though, and from what I read and seen I get the feeling that my problem is with cord closure. I have also found one exercise that helped me a little, and that is the "Goog" exercise. Basically I would say that my speaking tone is sometimes breathy and I feel like I have to "push" it to get heard. and I am looking forward with anticipation to hear any insights, advice and/or exercises from anyone who is familiar with this condition who can help. Thanks!
  19. Hi guys, I recently did a virtual job interview to record myself answering questions. That's when I realized my speaking voice is extremely carrying tension and heavy, when I zoom in I can see veins popping out of my neck. I cannot speak for 1 hour continuously without my throat feeling tired and worn out even turning breathy. I have tried many things; sirens, scales, slides, humming, tongue trills, straws, etc. Nothing seems to work because when speaking that bad throaty habit comes back, what should I do? I am considering going to a speech therapist.
  20. It sounds completely absurd, doesn’t it? Believe it or not, in some cases, it is completely true. At first, when the person gets diagnosed with any kind ofvoice problems, they become devastated, then frustrated; after that, depressed and then, believe it or not, they get used to it and, in some cases, they truly embrace it. They have no other choice, you may exclaim! Yes, partially you are right, my reader. They have to embrace it and get into balance to be able to deal with their voice issues accordingly and promptly. However, a lot of people, after conducting a short search, give up on getting better and soon give up on even claiming their life back. Moreover, they discover support groups where they get “support”, but not how to fix their voice problem, but how to learn to live with it; and yes, “love” it. So now, they are caught in a catch 22 situation, so to speak.They have found, so called support, from group members. They also seem to have found emotional support from their family members and friends. Everybody is feeling sorry for them and expressing their sympathy. And before they know it, they, very quickly, get use to it. Then, sometime down the road, they discover the real help, which could actually suggest and lead them, in majority of cases, to the full recovery of their normal, or even better voice then they originally owned. And then, believe it or not, instead of getting excited, they are getting scared. . ? Of what, you may ask? The answer is; they are afraid of taking action towards becoming better and conquering their voice issues. And why? Because once they are back to normal, they might lose the attention of those who originally were expressing their sympathy and feeling sorry for them. They got use to it and they do not want to lose it. Having a voice disorder, they feel, somewhat “special” and expect special treatment by the people surrounding them. I am just going to give you one example from my 40+ years of practice dealing with all sorts of people with and without vocal disorders, issues or problems.……………………………………………………………………………………………...About a couple of years ago, a young girl of 26 years of age, walked into my studio/clinic with a horrible voice disorder known as muscle tension dysphonia. She hardly could speak and told me in despair that she used to be a medical assistant for ophthalmologists. When she lost her voice due to her very erratic behavior, (smoking, drinking, drugs and loud late night parties), she was let go from her position, as she could no longer communicate with the clients. At that point, she was collecting employment insurance. Nevertheless, I offered a huge discount for my non-surgical voice repair program, consisting of psychological counseling, diet and nutrition counseling, my unique voice instruction coupled with certain body movements which help to lift the voice off of the injured area (the neck muscles and the vocal box); and lastly, natural herbal and homeopathic treatments to heal the throat flora by also removing all of the impurities (like acid and mucus) from the bottom of the throat. After I explained to her all of this, which took about 2 hours, she left with no charge from my side and with tears in her eyes and promise that she will be back as soon as possible to take me up on my generous offer. Sometime after, she called a couple of times, arranged appointments and payment schedules, and never showed up once. Eventually, after about a year and a half from our initial meeting, she called again and now said that she is definitely coming to pay me and pick up a set of herbs so she could start her instruction and treatment with me almost right away. She showed up a couple of times; each time late for at least an hour or longer. She did half of the instruction, as she always had to go somewhere; and also she was, according to her, feeling tired. Out of 10 hours she arranged with me, she took only a maximum of 6 hours in total, which she had stretched for over a year period of time and canceled her appointments with me, at least 10 times in the process. Then she disappeared for another year and, as usual, being apologetic and blaming herself, she almost “swore on the bible” that this time around, she would finish her remaining hours, as she wanted to go back to work. (All this time, she was collecting government assistance and gotten used to staying up late and getting up at 3:00PM). Nevertheless, by now, she was loving it all the way. However, (not being stupid, by far), she intellectually knew that it was all wrong and she should get better and get back to her normal life. She also kept confirming that I was her one and only vehicle to bring her to victory. By now, it is shooting close to 3 years from the beginning of this ordeal. She contacted me at the beginning of this year again and promised to restart the program with me no later then, now, past April/May. Ever since then, I have not heard from her for about 8 or 9 months. Go figure! She is in her late 20s by now and, as far as I am concerned, her young life is ruined. She fell in love with her present lifestyle on a physical and psychological level and constantly fighting with her intellectual understanding of the matter. However, it does not prosper her forward and frankly, I don’t think that it ever will. How sad is that? To conclude: Please don’t get used to your voice disabilities. Please don’t fall in love with it and with the newfound “lifestyle”. The longer you are in it, the harder it will be to snap out of it. And if you don’t, it will be a complete waste of your, once precious, life. I have numerous examples of that happening which I will reiterate to you in my future upcoming blogs.
  21. I have been doing research on vocal health since I wanna make sure danger is always at bay and i often hear ppl saying "singing causes me throat pain" etc... btw I wanna know where is "throat pain" felt exactly for wrong technique? is it like the place where you feel sore when you have a cold and get sore throat or is it somewhere down in the throat box where you feel the glottal attack?
  22. VocalScience

    ArticlesVocal Injury

    Vocal Injury: The pain could be inevitable, but the suffering should be optional. Like many of my other clients, Karen lived with her voice disorder for almost two decades. She had seen many medical professionals, alternative doctors, and nevertheless, speech therapists. To all of them, she had been complaining about the pain in her throat, her neck and her shoulder, evidently associated with that. Practically all of them told her that it is all in her head. Only one of the specialists was able to diagnose her with muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), but like everybody else, he was not able to administrate any kind of treatment which would help Karen to get rid of her nagging pain while speaking. Needless to say, she was devastated and practically was ready to give up on life. She is a very vibrant and boisterous person who loves to talk a lot. Some of the so-called medical professionals ordered her to keep silent for six months!! Needless to say, I had quite a few cases like Karen's in the past. In brings out the memory of my former client, George L., a real estate agent from Los Angeles, California, who went through the similar ordeal. Nobody could tell him also what was wrong with him and every treatment George took around the world would make his sufferings with his voice worse than before. And he needed to speak for a living! Twenty minutes into my first session, George had tears in his eyes and said to me, I'm honored to be in the same room with such a specialist like you.Four days later, George left very happy with his voice completely recovered. The fact is, that from the medical doctor and the alternative practitioners point of view, there is nothing wrong with such patients like my two clients described above. Why, you, my reader, may ask? Because the problem, one more time again, is mechanical. None of the doctors know how to fix the mechanics of voice, i.e. recover it from the neck and chest muscles; structure it and place it in the sinus (facial) cavities; and how to create the support of the sound from the lower and upper abdominal muscles; and how to integrate and synchronize those muscles to work simultaneously with each other. The description of the Vocal Science Method is such that it requires the synchronicity and synergy between mental, physical, emotional and vocal components. If that doesn't happen, the voice repair will never be accomplished. If that wholesome mechanism which allows the voice to work in its fullest capacity possible with no pain or strain on the vocal anatomy is not established, the voice, speaking or singing, will never have a healthy sound and always will be prone to some kind of injury. With that mechanism in place, the speaker or singer will also be able to comply with standards of professional speaking or singing, and nevertheless, preserve their recovered voices for their lifetime. View full articles
  23. If you can, you will be able to use your voice, by design, and think on a parallel track and in synchronicity with your speaking or singing. Nevertheless, this is an invaluable skill to have. The fact is that the majority of people do not possess that skill, as they are simply out-of-balance and out of alignment. Some of them think long and hard before producing the speaking or singing sounds and thus, evidently, “missing the boat”. The others, opposite; they speak and sing without boarders and think, if at all, after the fact. It is especially crucial for those who have been undergoing a non-surgical voice repair ordeal. In fact, the above-described imbalance was also a contributing factor to their voice disorder in the first place. The human being who is, in fact, in balance, is most likely able to think and act on a parallel track, which means that his/her subconscious mind and conscious mind are aligned and thus, work on a parallel track with each other. The subconscious mind is responsible for the thinking and the conscious mind plays the role of the driving force. If they are in agreement with each other, the voice should come out as the outcome of the above equation. If the synchronicity between the subconscious and conscious mind is disrupted, the person will not be able to produce any sound upon design and will get stagnated with their thinking and no action, or with the action, which is not supported by any structural thinking. In this case, the singer most likely will be going out of tune and out of timing and, no doubts, sooner or later, will end up with some kind of voice disorder. The regular speaking person, who is very loud in an everyday basis, screaming and shouting at all given times and without boarders, also will end up with some kind of voice damage down the road. As these people have no understanding of any kind that their voice is also one of their organs and if abused, it will lose its functionality, just like a liver will give up its functions for the alcoholics. To conclude – The balance is everything, and so is the knowledge. Stop yelling and screaming before, during and after the voice repair work. Speak in moderation and be always on guard that the voice is a fragile human organ and could snap and become damaged at any given time. For singers - don’t push your voice to the extreme high or low notes without knowledge how to approach and access it. Please learn how to hear yourself thinking and act accordingly and timely.
  24. Attention all Speakers and Singers! If you have noticed that your speaking or singing voice is not performing as per usual and rather sounds lower and somewhat hoarse, PLEASE STOP!!! If you continue speaking in your usual manor and disregard the fact that your voice is feeling scratchy and your throat is feeling itchy, you might lose your voice completely and for some time ahead. Singers: please do not continue singing if you have noticed that it is much harder now to reach your high notes, which normally would not be a problem and if you have to push and pull your voice out of your inflamed, sore throat. At that time, you may also notice that your voice has deepened and has begun to sound scratchy and hoarse. If you don’t stop in time and look into your voice and vocal anatomy problem, that could be very much the end of your singing career. Coaching and repairing voices for over 40 years, I had a lot of cases where the performer did not stop on time to address the vocal problem he had and, as a result, got his vocal cord paralyzed, or just damaged beyond repair. One case comes to mind where I received a client from Atlanta Georgia who happened to be a Pastor, who was appointed to travel the world to preach and sing prayers. He got laryngitis, (my guess would be that it came from the wrong way of singing and some stress associated with it). So instead of stopping and looking into the problem, either medically or alternatively, he continued his engagements until he could not do it at all. And then there was the moment of truth. As a result of not taking proper care of the laryngitis and not using the right vocal technique (speaking and singing), his right vocal cord got paralyzed. Vocal paralysis is very hard to reverse and not always possible. However, I have had a very good success with it, especially if only one vocal cord was affected. Although, the complete cure of the vocal paralysis may not occur, using the actual Vocal Science™ technique, coupled with the (designed by me), special speech and singing exercises, will make the person much more articulate and clear, so the individual’s speaking voice will begin sounding almost as per normal. With respect of the singing voice, it’s not that easy and with the damage like this, it is definitely not always possible to restore it. As much as I could try to go around the effected vocal cord (via my method), if it doesn’t start moving at least remotely, the effort could easily become obsolete.
  25. Indeed, should you give up, or rather do something, which will (at least) improve the quality of your life?What are those untreatable, nasty voice disorders?It definitely is vocal paralysis (paresis) or both vocal cords, the severe forms of spasmodic dysphonia, the severe forms of muscle tension dysphonia, scar tissue on the vocal cords, damaged vocal box and it’s anatomy due to/or during the surgical procedure and many more others . Once, not too long ago, in my office/studio walked in a middle-aged, pretty handsome Asian man with his wife. It was very sad to try to speak with the man, as there was nothing else coming out of his mouth but mooing. I could not understand one word he was trying to say. Then his wife took over the “conversation”. She told us a story that her husband had a cancer of thyroid. Then the doctors first were trying to get rid of the cancer, they conducted a surgical procedure, which had paralyzed one of his vocal cords (vocal paresis). Then he was suggested to undergo chemotherapy and radiation treatments, which, naturally, worsened his voice condition. He became even more raspy and hoarse and then became hardly understood.Then doctors decided to proceed with the second operation to remove the remaining cancer from his thyroid. After he came out of the second surgery, his second vocal cord was also completely paralyzed. How horrible it might be for the man in his mid-40’s to have communication difficulties, to the point that he could not form any sensible words! He came with the hope that I will offer him a magic pill and a magic cure…? On one hand, of course, you cannot blame him that he was looking for a miracle. On the other hand, how realistic is that? I have explained to him that his condition cannot be cured, either by me or anybody else for that matter. But what I could have done for him is improve the quality of his speaking; to improve clarity, annunciation and pronunciation, if not for all words, but for the majority of the words. How would I do this, you may ask? With the great difficulty, a lot of patience, huge intensity on both of our parts, employing the tedious Vocal Science ™ method and all of my 40 years experience, dealing with the health related (and other kinds) of voice/vocal disorders. I would teach him how to speak, employing facial muscles, the use of which would make his voice at least 4 times more resonant and amplified. Also, employing along with facial muscles, the abdominal muscles, would allow him to have a greater support of the sound, the proper lift of the sound off of the vocal box and thus he would become more understood, which means his confidence would be improved by far and the quality of life would be more enhanced and escalated. Unfortunately, my prospective client could not understand how he could use the different muscles (facial muscles working in full conjunction and coordination with the abdominal muscles) and not the vocal cords. Too bad for him because, as far as I am concerned, this tedious and intense, syllable-on-syllable, word-on-word Vocal Science™ technique is the only hope he had. Evidently, not all vocal severe damages are curable, but almost all of them are treatable to some degree. It requires the understanding, willingness and 'lovingness', an open heart & soul and true belief in the improvement of one’s condition. Without the above, there is no point for any of the parties involved, to embark on such, not very easy at all, endeavor. If you find this content informative and helpful, please refer to our websites for more detailed information, or give Diana Yampolsky a call for a free consultation on any of the vocal problems you, or your loved one(s) might have. 416-857-8741 www.vocalscience.com www.repairyourvoice.com