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Found 146 results

  1. Congratulations Brooke Sunny Moriber, on your new EP "Here and Gone". This tune "99 Days of Rain", its great. Lovely harmonies and super catchy. I think a strong hit for radio syndication. I look forward to catching up with you one day soon.
  2. Hey guys. re: True, which is why I train. Here's a quick video I made and uploaded to Youtube. It's me doing warmups. You see me pause a bunch at my breaks. Again, it seems like I sing better in Falsetto/high head. Enjoy, or, er, try not to have you ears bleed.
  3. I think it would be nice to have some additions to the website. Ratings for each video. Comments for each video. This would be good both for students, to learn from each other and see if a video works or not, as well as for Robert, to take feedback on videos and see which works etc. Possibly add buttons for "needs work", "confusing", "too long", "boring", "insulting"/"downtalk","redundant", etc. These would be quicker forms of feedback that would allow Robert to make note of areas that may need to be changed. For example. I just watched a 6 min plus video that was talking (arguing) about semantics, and talking about wasting time. Ironically, I felt the video was wasting my time (no offence intended here, just trying to offer critique for improvement). I also felt that there was a lack of information on proper understanding of what "operational definition" is on Robert's side. The video could easily have been made shorter, addressed in a more objective and informative tone, and less confrontational towards a non-existent combatant.. ----- (I'm talking about the "mixed voice" is dead video. ) Not sure if anyone else would find ratings/comments useful. But I think I would. Perhaps even a search function.
  4. Hey guys. I figured I might as well start a Journal... It will keep me on track. There wasn't any Sticky that I could find on Journals, so I am just going to wing it. Basically, I assume it's a record of our experiences. Words, audio/ video... This Journal of mine will probably be a mix of video and word. So, to begin. I've had the four pillars program since 2014. I got it. Watched a bunch of videos. Tried some of the stuff. And then just left it. I think the reason for this is that the interface just kind of throws everything in your face. There doesn't seem to be a set flow for what you are suppost to be doing and in which order. If there is, I still haven't found it yet. Now that I am back at it, I am still finding this. The videos are very long, and seem to drag in spots. I think it wouldn't be so bad if I wasn't going in so blind. If there was some clear order then I would know what to do when. Also, I find that having 40 mins lectures cuts down on potential singing time. That said, I wouldn't want to trade it and lose the info. I would prefer if they were separated so I could choose to watch less. The interface needs work, in my opinion. But, as I said, I got this back in 2014 - meaning all of those changes might have been done already. My biggest hurdle I find is finding out where to start. There's no real break down of what to do, how long, etc. Nor mentions of how to approach singing along to songs. I am used to the format of doing warmups and then focus on singing a song, and then breaking apart certain areas for improvement. Any advice so I'm not going in so blind would be helpful. I have watched a bunch of the video lectures in order, and one video demo. Oh. I forgot to add. I just signed up for singing lessons in Edmonton. A bit of a drive for me. One hour. But it's beside where I work, so that's good. It's also a music school/studio. Which means, I hope, that the lessons will be better than what I had before. The last time I took lessons it was at a music store. There focus was mainly on selling instruments and equipment.
  5. Getting back into it.

    Hi all. I bought The four pillars program way back in 2014... Since then I really haven't practiced it, largely because I haven't had time. I still have yet to use the online lessons I purchased with Robert when I bought it. (been holding out until I had more time and some basic practice in). I did do a stint of singing lessons with a one on one trainer at Long and Mcquade here in Alberta. I learnt some things. But largely, I learnt that I too can just play the lessons she was playing from her phone and sing downloaded songs from itunes. It is much cheaper to just do it on my own. I think part of the problem was that she seemed to largely be "phoning it in" (not really trying hard at her job). I already owned the singing course she was using, and she didn't really offer me much than be an extra ear. It was beneficial to have the steady schedule though. I am trying to get back into it (singing). I have an older (I am assuming) edition of 4pillars. Just curious where people recommend starting off? Also, I am open to suggestions for songs/singers for me to practice with. I prefer songs that - hmm, how to put this - actually involve singing. Being a male, a male singer would be better. But I do tend to sing along to female vocals, largely because they tend to hold notes more and make it sound more like singing, and less like talking with tone. My personal preference is Marianas Trench. For example Desperate Measures I enjoy singing similar to Josh Ramsey, Justin Timberlake, Jacob Hoggard, etc. Any recommendations? As a side note... I find that Josh tends to sing right at my bridge. I have to constantly flip into falsetto, while he clearly sings in his (head?) voice without kicking into falsetto much. Those rough but high notes. Any recommendations to raise my "rough but high note range" without kicking into falsetto? Any views on adding timbre to vocals? I find that in the process of trying to match timbre I end up creating my own and it sounds quite different...
  6. Congratulations to Priscila da Costa. Our new TVS Certified Instructor in Luxembourg. Priscila da Costa trains 40 hours for TVS Certification in Seattle, WA with Robert Lunte. She is now an expert in the TVS Method and is prepared to help singers around the world. https://thevocaliststudio.com/tvs-certified-instructor-program/ I am very impressed with what I saw and heard during your teacher training. You will be GREAT! Super proud and your students are fortunate to have you. Be sure to listen to the last chorus, it is amazing. Priscila da Costa is a TVS Certified Instructor from Luxembourg. This is her original song, "Twisted Mind" that we worked on together in preparation for her EP release and this video.
  7. So who done the forum over then?

    Hi how are you doing fellow singers. Let me introduce myself then. I am an old time user of this forum that has since in the last 3 days ago decided not to use this forum any more; and the reason I have made this decision is because and since then some bright spark who moderates this forum for some strange reason has decided to delete and remove the entire past 2 weeks worth of postings and threads and yes this would include those of you that have paid premium fees such as having your singing review. I find this a disgusting attitude and complete bigotery! and no doubt by my attitude and tone of my voice some of you will know who I am or once was. So on that note its lights out for me and close the door and I'm out of hear and done. But I am sure you will be glad to see the back of me since I did not purchase your product anyway So go on and do it! do your best of craftmanships and remove this thread and user ID like you have done with the rest of the last 2 weeks of data. And BTW well done you Kevin A for recontributing to this forum (to a 4 week old post) well done you for playing into there hands for playing there evil little game and honestly do you have nothing better to do with your time. Thanks for reading and yours sincerely all the best to you all in your singing success and careers. But I am sorry I can no longer play this game any longer as I have found a bigot whom is now my new vocal coach BTW I am going to bed now as it is 1am GMT hear in the UK and I will not return for a good good 18 hours and work in the morning and everything ells so I will not know what you have done since then. But at least I try LOL
  8. Hi, I posted this a few days ago, but for technical reasons the post was lost. Robert Lunte already kindly reviewed it, but if anyone else feels like giving me (constructive) feedback on singing, songwriting or recording, that would be great. It's a prog rock piece just over 8 minutes long, hopefully you'll stick through to the end (which was the hardest part to sing due to the challenging harmonies). George
  9. Steve Antonsen has been training with TVS for over 10 years. He is a successful blues metal singer and has toured around the world in his band, Colossal Boss. http://www.colossalboss.com/ http://www.TheVocalistStudio.com
  10. Draven's Invite CLICK HERE TO REGISTER >>>
  11. Journey Practice

    It has been a while since I have posted anything. If you have any comment good or bad let me know. Thanks.
  12. Modes and Kpop

    Hey everyone. I'm pretty new to singing and don't sing very well, but I came across some of Robert's videos on YouTube and it inspired me, I might purchase the four pillars. I have a question about modes and increasing range. I'm a fan of Kpop and aspire to sing similarly (in a ballad style). Here's a YouTube video as an example and I'd like to know what he's doing, Kpop ballad singers have a youthful, sweet light sound, is it because they're tenors? Or just the way they're singing? I think I'm a baritone and I can make my voice lighter but it doesn't really sound the same. Also at 4:23 onward he hits an A or b4 and I wonder whether that's in chest register or head with twang? Male Kpop singers always hit A4-c5 in the climax of their ballads and I'm unable to take my chest beyond an F4(that's a strain). I'm not sure what y'all think about mixed voice thanks!
  13. The Four Pillars of Singing now available as a one-time purchase for lifetime access. https://thevocaliststudio.com/the-four-pillars-of-singing/
  14. First of all, just thought it would be nice to point out that i sent this question to Rob by email. And he sent me here, so that he could answer it in public and everyone could benefit. What a nice guy Rob is. Been learning a lot from his program, still studying and working on all the stuff, registered not long ago. It's quite a lot of content to fully diggest and grasp!. And most of all, actually apply!. Which is awesome of course, haven't had a course as detailed/comprehensive as this one. Not even close. Before i bought it i was actually wondering why many people called it "comprehensive", now it makes total sense. And the time i spent wondering on if i should get it, could have been spent further studying and applying the techniques. So i encourage others to start ASAP. On to the question, might be a rather simple question, that i probably know the answer too but just am not concious enough to apply it, it can be easy to forget. So of course asking will save me the doubts. And hopefully others as well. This quote from the program/book "Engaging the respiratory system sufficiently to optimize your phonations as a singer is not intuitive for the body. Even after 30 years of singing, training and teaching around the world, i still, to this day, have to be very conscientious of engaging my respiratory support when i train and sing. If i do not, just like everyone else, i start sounding like a duck (and get tired from all the squeezing)." So basically what i took from this was, concious support is mandatory, both in training and singing. Basically you should ALWAYS engage some sort of support. Both in training and singing?. Now i didn't include this part in the email but i want too add a question, how "key" is this?. I think a lot of students these days need a lot of "value guidance" in order to fully recognize what they should be working on. It seems self explanatory, but on a scale of 1/5 - i'd like to know where this stands specifically in your program. Just for perspective. Which btw reminds me of a feature i really liked in the program, in which Rob basically does what i just said. He outlines the most "key" lessons to work on of every section/module. And of course each one also has long detailed descriptions/ illustrations / examples / and my favorite - benefits and troubleshooting. He clearly put A LOT of effort into this. Very thoughtful effort, might i add. Since a lot of programs out there don't go into such detail. Anyways, That's the question. (With some extra rambling included). Heck in a sense that's a mini review. Although i could say a lot more. Rob deserves the praise. Also thanks Rob for encouraging me to get registered, there is clearly a lot of value in this forum i was missing on.
  15. No Pain, No Gain With Singing!

    You can NOT become a better singer by only experiencing the pleasure of training and singing. Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. Martin Luther King, Jr. To belittle knowledge and the way things work, is a popular tactic that is occasionally seen by some people in the singing industry. It is interesting to note that people who make the "less knowledge and understanding is not very important to learning how to sing", argument all suspiciously have one thing in common. They don't have a product to sell and/or if they do, the offering lacks depth. They don't choose to explain how and why the singing voice does what it does. You will never see CVI, EVTS, TVS or programs that offer some scientific insights publish a video or forum post that makes the claim, "... you don't have to know all that complex stuff, just let your inner feelings carry you through. That's all you need. It should never be hard, it should always be easy. You can just will it to happen. Don't bother learning any of the science of singing"... The world's best training programs will never say that. There are two things that motivate people. Pain and pleasure. Some people like to be given permission to avoid all the pain from voice training and learning how to sing. Promise them that they can learn to sing better without any "pain", ( practice, commitment, doing the same thing over and over again, reading a book, paying attention to a lesson, understanding a methodology, understanding how vowels work, etc... ), and they happily get on board. They don't want any "pain" associated with training or learning how to sing better. They only want instant gratification and pleasure. By no means is everyone like this. However, for those that do respond to that message, there will always be someone there to "sell" it to them. View full articles
  16. No Pain, No Gain With Singing!

    You can NOT become a better singer by only experiencing the pleasure of training and singing. Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. Martin Luther King, Jr. To belittle knowledge and the way things work, is a popular tactic that is occasionally seen by some people in the singing industry. It is interesting to note that people who make the "less knowledge and understanding is not very important to learning how to sing", argument all suspiciously have one thing in common. They don't have a product to sell and/or if they do, the offering lacks depth. They don't choose to explain how and why the singing voice does what it does. You will never see CVI, EVTS, TVS or programs that offer some scientific insights publish a video or forum post that makes the claim, "... you don't have to know all that complex stuff, just let your inner feelings carry you through. That's all you need. It should never be hard, it should always be easy. You can just will it to happen. Don't bother learning any of the science of singing"... The world's best training programs will never say that. There are two things that motivate people. Pain and pleasure. Some people like to be given permission to avoid all the pain from voice training and learning how to sing. Promise them that they can learn to sing better without any "pain", ( practice, commitment, doing the same thing over and over again, reading a book, paying attention to a lesson, understanding a methodology, understanding how vowels work, etc... ), and they happily get on board. They don't want any "pain" associated with training or learning how to sing better. They only want instant gratification and pleasure. By no means is everyone like this. However, for those that do respond to that message, there will always be someone there to "sell" it to them.
  17. You can NOT become a better singer by only experiencing the pleasure of training and singing. Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. Martin Luther King, Jr. To belittle knowledge and the way things work, is a popular tactic that is occasionally seen by some people in the singing industry. It is interesting to note that people who make the "less knowledge and understanding is not very important to learning how to sing", argument all suspiciously have one thing in common. They don't have a product to sell and/or if they do, the offering lacks depth. They don't choose to explain how and why the singing voice does what it does. You will never see CVI, EVTS, TVS or programs that offer some scientific insights publish a video or forum post that makes the claim, "... you don't have to know all that complex stuff, just let your inner feelings carry you through. That's all you need. It should never be hard, it should always be easy. You can just will it to happen. Don't bother learning any of the science of singing"... The world's best training programs will never say that. There are two things that motivate people. Pain and pleasure. Some people like to be given permission to avoid all the pain from voice training and learning how to sing. Promise them that they can learn to sing better without any "pain", ( practice, commitment, doing the same thing over and over again, reading a book, paying attention to a lesson, understanding a methodology, understanding how vowels work, etc... ), and they happily get on board. They don't want any "pain" associated with training or learning how to sing better. They only want instant gratification and pleasure. By no means is everyone like this. However, for those that do respond to that message, there will always be someone there to "sell" it to them.
  18. MAESTRO DAVID KYLE THE WINDOW OF FAME Vocal teacher for all styles for over 50 years, David Kyle, The “Maestro” became a local Seattle icon and was considered by the industry to be one of the best vocal instructors for contemporary singers in the world. Unique to the “Maestro’s” approach was his method for expanding vocal range into multiple “registers”, or what we would refer to today at TVS as, "Bridging & Connecting". Maestro was also keen on eliminating psychological barriers that hinder singers’ freedom of expression, by use of creative visualization techniques and development of healthy auditory imagery for singing. One day, Nate Burch, one of my students from Seattle, came to the lesson with an old coffee stained piece of paper that had a hand written, transcribed lecture from Maestro Kyle on it. An excerpt from that lecture is shared below as well as popular quotes that Maestro Kyle used to use with all his students. Maestro David Kyle & Robert Lunte - The Vocalist Studio MAESTRO DAVID P. KYLE LECTURE: Those sounds which seem to ring the most are usually the best. Those which seem the roundest are usually the best. Those which seem to resonate are usually the best. Those which seem to echo are usually the best. So listen out into the theater and see if they are echoing, and if they are round, and they are resonant. Connect your notes and don’t be afraid. There are two kinds of stars. There are “stars” and there are “superstars.” The star no matter how he tries he just can’t seem to become a superstar. He’s great, great, great, great, but along comes a Caruso, or a Lanza, or a Gigli, and he can’t quite get over the hurdle. It’s because of one simple thing. The star sings, and when he’s singing he listens to himself; and while he’s listening he shapes it; and he opinionates it; and he shapes it around. If it isn’t round enough he rounds it more. And that sounds logical doesn’t it? It’s wrong! The superstar pictures the sound and knows what he wants to hear before he makes it! Singing is more the concept than anything. If we’ve got the right idea, then the muscles as they train more and more they become like a reflex and the reflexes respond to the image. Even if you’re trained beautifully and your image is a fear that you haven’t got high notes and it’ll never get there the reflexes won’t respond no matter how well trained you are. The epitome of it is you can say singing is absolutely mental. In the process of getting to realize that you have to take a lot of physical steps before you begin to see it, but it is true! The singer has to be in the consciousness and the mood. How does one establish a consciousness and a mood? You tend to become as you act. So if you pretend and try to get your feelings to act as you think they would act if you were doing it, then you’re getting in the consciousness. But if our consciousness is only on body and physical things then our mind is... The rest of the lecture offers another 5 pages of incredible insights about how the mind controls the singing voice. Read the entire lecture in The Four Pillars of Singing. Maestro David Kyle - The Vocalist Studio Maestro David Kyle Quotes “Good singers sing and listen, Great singers listen, then sing” “Good speech is half sung, but good singing is not half spoken.” “Wear the world like a loose garment. Don’t let it tighten in on you.” “Suppose you were learning to drive a car. Would it be better to learn on a road with no obstructions?” “Every negation is a blessing in disguise.” “The art of the art is the art that conceals the art.” “He who would know aught of art must first learn and then take his ease.” “When you open up you should be able to see light from both ends.” “Feel like you are singing with your whole body.” “Your reflexes respond to your image.” “The reflexes respond to the imagination.” “Listen away from yourself.” “Sing on the balls of your feet, like the American Indian.” “Burn Bridges and don’t look back.” “Listen away from yourself, right out into the auditorium.” “Singing is both a science and an art. All art is all imagination and you cannot fix that.” “You have to believe you will receive before you receive and then you will get it.” “Visualize you are already what you want to be. Act as if you are that, and you will become it.” “If you always notice what you are while trying to get there, you’ll never get there.” “Start as if the sound begins before the breath.” “The end is in the beginning, and the beginning is in the end.” “It’s not a game I’m playing! If you think that you’re short changing yourself.” “People don’t get tired of their work; they get tired of the resistance to their work.” “Forever diet the voice. Diet the voice; diet the mind; diet the spirit; diet everything but your income!” “Feel like your whole self is all a part of the sound, like the full violin is just vibrating.” “Imagine the sound you want, picture the sound you want.” “Open up the entire body and see the light through both ends!” “Breath, pause, release the jaw, visualize the sound you want, and sing to the back of (Carnegie Hall).” “We don’t let attitudes control us, we control them!” “Only babies are victims of moods!” “Let the sound flow right over the roof of the mouth into the masque.” “Bowels up, vowels forward.” “Some day you’re going to stand up and say, ‘This is me’ and go!” “We tend to become as we act.” “Attitude is everything in everything.” “Every time you find your thinking going to the strain or the resistance, immediately create mentally the sound that you want, hear what you want.” “And remember you have a beautiful voice. At your worst you sound better than many of them at their best!” “Just don’t sound like everyone else!” “And tell it your singing marvelous, you’re singing wonderfully!” “Sing Away from yourself, to something.” “Listen, then sing!” “Way to go Baby!” Maestro David Kyle passed on Saturday, November 27th of 2004 OTHER VOICE COACHES OF ROBERT LUNTE...
  19. MAESTRO DAVID KYLE THE WINDOW OF FAME Vocal teacher for all styles for over 50 years, David Kyle, The “Maestro” became a local Seattle icon and was considered by the industry to be one of the best vocal instructors for contemporary singers in the world. Unique to the “Maestro’s” approach was his method for expanding vocal range into multiple “registers”, or what we would refer to today at TVS as, "Bridging & Connecting". Maestro was also keen on eliminating psychological barriers that hinder singers’ freedom of expression, by use of creative visualization techniques and development of healthy auditory imagery for singing. Use of amplification and embracing technology was also an important part of the “David Kyle” training experience that carries over to TVS training with Robert Lunte as well. In addition to these details, Robert Lunte's vocal training program, The Four Pillars of Singing, found at this web site, offers 10 of Maestro Kyle's vocal workouts. Another 22 original vocal workouts developed by Robert Lunte are added to The Four Pillars of Singing training program with slow and fast versions of every workout to accommodate different student's levels of experience. All together, The Four Pillars of Singing offers a total of 32 vocal workouts with 64 different options to explore and train your voice. One day, Nate Burch, one of Robert Lunte's students from Seattle, came to the lesson with an old coffee stained piece of paper that had a hand written, transcribed lecture from Maestro Kyle on it. An excerpt from that lecture is shared below as well as popular quotes that Maestro Kyle used to use with all his students. The complete lecture is provided inside The Four Pillars of Singing Hard Copy Book and training system as part of the tribute to Maestro Kyle that Robert Lunte added to The Four Pillars of Singing. Maestro David Kyle & Robert Lunte - The Vocalist Studio MAESTRO DAVID P. KYLE LECTURE: Those sounds which seem to ring the most are usually the best. Those which seem the roundest are usually the best. Those which seem to resonate are usually the best. Those which seem to echo are usually the best. So listen out into the theater and see if they are echoing, and if they are round, and they are resonant. Connect your notes and don’t be afraid. There are two kinds of stars. There are “stars” and there are “superstars.” The star no matter how he tries he just can’t seem to become a superstar. He’s great, great, great, great, but along comes a Caruso, or a Lanza, or a Gigli, and he can’t quite get over the hurdle. It’s because of one simple thing. The star sings, and when he’s singing he listens to himself; and while he’s listening he shapes it; and he opinionates it; and he shapes it around. If it isn’t round enough he rounds it more. And that sounds logical doesn’t it? It’s wrong! The superstar pictures the sound and knows what he wants to hear before he makes it! Singing is more the concept than anything. If we’ve got the right idea, then the muscles as they train more and more they become like a reflex and the reflexes respond to the image. Even if you’re trained beautifully and your image is a fear that you haven’t got high notes and it’ll never get there the reflexes won’t respond no matter how well trained you are. The epitome of it is you can say singing is absolutely mental. In the process of getting to realize that you have to take a lot of physical steps before you begin to see it, but it is true! The singer has to be in the consciousness and the mood. How does one establish a consciousness and a mood? You tend to become as you act. So if you pretend and try to get your feelings to act as you think they would act if you were doing it, then you’re getting in the consciousness. But if our consciousness is only on body and physical things then our mind is... The rest of the lecture offers another 5 pages of incredible insights about how the mind controls the singing voice. Read the entire lecture in The Four Pillars of Singing hard copy book, eBook & course work at this web site. Maestro David Kyle - The Vocalist Studio The Four Pillars of Singing With 12 of the Key Vocal Workouts Maestro David Kyle taught! Maestro David Kyle Quotes “Good singers sing and listen, Great singers listen, then sing” “Good speech is half sung, but good singing is not half spoken.” “Wear the world like a loose garment. Don’t let it tighten in on you.” “Suppose you were learning to drive a car. Would it be better to learn on a road with no obstructions?” “Every negation is a blessing in disguise.” “The art of the art is the art that conceals the art.” “He who would know aught of art must first learn and then take his ease.” “When you open up you should be able to see light from both ends.” “Feel like you are singing with your whole body.” “Your reflexes respond to your image.” “The reflexes respond to the imagination.” “Listen away from yourself.” “Sing on the balls of your feet, like the American Indian.” “Burn Bridges and don’t look back.” “Listen away from yourself, right out into the auditorium.” “Singing is both a science and an art. All art is all imagination and you cannot fix that.” “You have to believe you will receive before you receive and then you will get it.” “Visualize you are already what you want to be. Act as if you are that, and you will become it.” “If you always notice what you are while trying to get there, you’ll never get there.” “Start as if the sound begins before the breath.” “The end is in the beginning, and the beginning is in the end.” “It’s not a game I’m playing! If you think that you’re short changing yourself.” “People don’t get tired of their work; they get tired of the resistance to their work.” “Forever diet the voice. Diet the voice; diet the mind; diet the spirit; diet everything but your income!” “Feel like your whole self is all a part of the sound, like the full violin is just vibrating.” “Imagine the sound you want, picture the sound you want.” “Open up the entire body and see the light through both ends!” “Breath, pause, release the jaw, visualize the sound you want, and sing to the back of (Carnegie Hall).” “We don’t let attitudes control us, we control them!” “Only babies are victims of moods!” “Let the sound flow right over the roof of the mouth into the masque.” “Bowels up, vowels forward.” “Some day you’re going to stand up and say, ‘This is me’ and go!” “We tend to become as we act.” “Attitude is everything in everything.” “Every time you find your thinking going to the strain or the resistance, immediately create mentally the sound that you want, hear what you want.” “And remember you have a beautiful voice. At your worst you sound better than many of them at their best!” “Just don’t sound like everyone else!” “And tell it your singing marvelous, you’re singing wonderfully!” “Sing Away from yourself, to something.” “Listen, then sing!” “Way to go Baby!” Maestro David Kyle passed on Saturday, November 27th of 2004 OTHER VOICE COACHES OF ROBERT LUNTE... View full articles
  20. MAESTRO DAVID KYLE THE WINDOW OF FAME Vocal teacher for all styles for over 50 years, David Kyle, The “Maestro” became a local Seattle icon and was considered by the industry to be one of the best vocal instructors for contemporary singers in the world. Unique to the “Maestro’s” approach was his method for expanding vocal range into multiple “registers”, or what we would refer to today at TVS as, "Bridging & Connecting". Maestro was also keen on eliminating psychological barriers that hinder singers’ freedom of expression, by use of creative visualization techniques and development of healthy auditory imagery for singing. Use of amplification and embracing technology was also an important part of the “David Kyle” training experience that carries over to TVS training with Robert Lunte as well. In addition to these details, Robert Lunte's vocal training program, The Four Pillars of Singing, found at this web site, offers 10 of Maestro Kyle's vocal workouts. Another 22 original vocal workouts developed by Robert Lunte are added to The Four Pillars of Singing training program with slow and fast versions of every workout to accommodate different student's levels of experience. All together, The Four Pillars of Singing offers a total of 32 vocal workouts with 64 different options to explore and train your voice. One day, Nate Burch, one of Robert Lunte's students from Seattle, came to the lesson with an old coffee stained piece of paper that had a hand written, transcribed lecture from Maestro Kyle on it. An excerpt from that lecture is shared below as well as popular quotes that Maestro Kyle used to use with all his students. The complete lecture is provided inside The Four Pillars of Singing Hard Copy Book and training system as part of the tribute to Maestro Kyle that Robert Lunte added to The Four Pillars of Singing. Maestro David Kyle & Robert Lunte - The Vocalist Studio MAESTRO DAVID P. KYLE LECTURE: Those sounds which seem to ring the most are usually the best. Those which seem the roundest are usually the best. Those which seem to resonate are usually the best. Those which seem to echo are usually the best. So listen out into the theater and see if they are echoing, and if they are round, and they are resonant. Connect your notes and don’t be afraid. There are two kinds of stars. There are “stars” and there are “superstars.” The star no matter how he tries he just can’t seem to become a superstar. He’s great, great, great, great, but along comes a Caruso, or a Lanza, or a Gigli, and he can’t quite get over the hurdle. It’s because of one simple thing. The star sings, and when he’s singing he listens to himself; and while he’s listening he shapes it; and he opinionates it; and he shapes it around. If it isn’t round enough he rounds it more. And that sounds logical doesn’t it? It’s wrong! The superstar pictures the sound and knows what he wants to hear before he makes it! Singing is more the concept than anything. If we’ve got the right idea, then the muscles as they train more and more they become like a reflex and the reflexes respond to the image. Even if you’re trained beautifully and your image is a fear that you haven’t got high notes and it’ll never get there the reflexes won’t respond no matter how well trained you are. The epitome of it is you can say singing is absolutely mental. In the process of getting to realize that you have to take a lot of physical steps before you begin to see it, but it is true! The singer has to be in the consciousness and the mood. How does one establish a consciousness and a mood? You tend to become as you act. So if you pretend and try to get your feelings to act as you think they would act if you were doing it, then you’re getting in the consciousness. But if our consciousness is only on body and physical things then our mind is... The rest of the lecture offers another 5 pages of incredible insights about how the mind controls the singing voice. Read the entire lecture in The Four Pillars of Singing hard copy book, eBook & course work at this web site. Maestro David Kyle - The Vocalist Studio The Four Pillars of Singing With 12 of the Key Vocal Workouts Maestro David Kyle taught! Maestro David Kyle Quotes “Good singers sing and listen, Great singers listen, then sing” “Good speech is half sung, but good singing is not half spoken.” “Wear the world like a loose garment. Don’t let it tighten in on you.” “Suppose you were learning to drive a car. Would it be better to learn on a road with no obstructions?” “Every negation is a blessing in disguise.” “The art of the art is the art that conceals the art.” “He who would know aught of art must first learn and then take his ease.” “When you open up you should be able to see light from both ends.” “Feel like you are singing with your whole body.” “Your reflexes respond to your image.” “The reflexes respond to the imagination.” “Listen away from yourself.” “Sing on the balls of your feet, like the American Indian.” “Burn Bridges and don’t look back.” “Listen away from yourself, right out into the auditorium.” “Singing is both a science and an art. All art is all imagination and you cannot fix that.” “You have to believe you will receive before you receive and then you will get it.” “Visualize you are already what you want to be. Act as if you are that, and you will become it.” “If you always notice what you are while trying to get there, you’ll never get there.” “Start as if the sound begins before the breath.” “The end is in the beginning, and the beginning is in the end.” “It’s not a game I’m playing! If you think that you’re short changing yourself.” “People don’t get tired of their work; they get tired of the resistance to their work.” “Forever diet the voice. Diet the voice; diet the mind; diet the spirit; diet everything but your income!” “Feel like your whole self is all a part of the sound, like the full violin is just vibrating.” “Imagine the sound you want, picture the sound you want.” “Open up the entire body and see the light through both ends!” “Breath, pause, release the jaw, visualize the sound you want, and sing to the back of (Carnegie Hall).” “We don’t let attitudes control us, we control them!” “Only babies are victims of moods!” “Let the sound flow right over the roof of the mouth into the masque.” “Bowels up, vowels forward.” “Some day you’re going to stand up and say, ‘This is me’ and go!” “We tend to become as we act.” “Attitude is everything in everything.” “Every time you find your thinking going to the strain or the resistance, immediately create mentally the sound that you want, hear what you want.” “And remember you have a beautiful voice. At your worst you sound better than many of them at their best!” “Just don’t sound like everyone else!” “And tell it your singing marvelous, you’re singing wonderfully!” “Sing Away from yourself, to something.” “Listen, then sing!” “Way to go Baby!” Maestro David Kyle passed on Saturday, November 27th of 2004 OTHER VOICE COACHES OF ROBERT LUNTE...
  21. Audix VX5 Review & Demonstration

    Robert Lunte, of The Vocalist Studio and The Four Pillars of Singing shares some details about the Audio VX5, condenser microphone. Purchase the Audix VX5 here: http://www.TheVocalGearStore.com. Description The VX5 is a multi purpose, professional vocal condenser microphone designed for live, studio and broadcast applications. With an ability to duplicate studio quality sound on stage, the VX5 has a smooth and accurate frequency response, resistance to feedback and handles very high SPLs without distortion. Designed with a tight and uniformly controlled supercardioid polar pattern, the VX5 helps isolate vocals from the rest of the stage. Other features are a 14 mm gold vapor diaphragm, an acoustically ported steel mesh grill with a multi-stage pop filter, and a -10 dB pad and bass roll-off filter. The VX5 will handle SPLs in excess of 140 dB (with pad and roll-off engaged) and will provide over 20 dB of ambient noise rejection on live stages. In addition to vocal applications, the VX5 is designed to capture instruments such as guitars, woodwinds, brasses, percussion toys, drum overheads, hi-hats and pianos. The VX5 requires 18 - 52 V phantom power. Applications - Live and studio vocals, lead and backing - Speech - Acoustic instruments Please see the spec sheet under the specifications tab for more information about this product.
  22. Robert Lunte - "Brandy"

    A classic from the 70s band, Looking Glass. Very fun to sing!
  23. Does professional and the vibrant and pleasant vocal tones develop over a long time? I am not currently satisfied with my range and tone especially and I want to be able to develop more and more. How is he able to manipulate his tone so well comparing the first two videos and third video? It's almost as if he's two different singers.. Personal questions: I have been singing for a while now but only recently throughout 2016 I have "Properly practiced" getting rid of my bad habits, fixing tone, pitch, etc. 1. Is it normal that after I started to do so, my range increased VERY FAST. In a span of 4-6 months, I am able now to reach the notes he is singing that otherwise BEFORE I would just choke and sound like I am shouting. Just curious because I am worried I might be destroying my voice by pushing it too hard. There are times before I damaged my voice by improper technique which I guess somehow made my voice range increase as a short cut? is that even possible? I tend to just go all out when I sing right after doing my workouts. Example song I practice is the first video I post below.. ( I am currently using Ken Tamplin's workouts, if that is helpful in any way). ONE IMPORTANT thing to note is that as I go up in pitch and shed my weight, It feels like the TONE of my voice gets higher as well. It's like I sound chesty in the lower ranges then suddenly like little kid in the higher ranges. I also tend to MIMIC singers for a long time... sadly.. is it normal that I am mimicing their style in every different singer? I feel like it doesn't sound "right" if I don't sing with their TONE. 2. As I go higher in pitch, is it normal to feel like something in my mask/palate area to NARROW DOWN? It feels like my mask area is flexing and my chords are very tightly closing. IT ISN'T PAINFUL. Or is this improper technique? Am I suppose to feel COMPLETELY OPEN? When I try to keep it completely open it feels like my voice goes SPLAT and airy and it hurts. Sometimes I feel like I am overwhelmed wondering if I am singing right or am I singing improperly even following his lessons and achieving growth. Anyways heres, the singer. How is his technique? It'll be awesome if there are some veterans or experienced singers to guide a newbie like myself to achieve this versatility in terms of programs and what I need to do. How does everyone here see Ken Tamplin's program?... Thank you!!
  24. I Will (The Beatles) Cover

    Dear All, I recently did a cover of I Will by The Beatles, with the attached Soundcloud link as follows: Your comments and review are absolutely appreciated. Thanks all! Regards sincerely, Tim
  25. Good morning Ray, thanks for randomly playing on my shuffle this morning as I drove into the studio. Keeping it real, and reminding me why the hell I started doing this...