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Found 114 results

  1. The Copperphone by Placid Audio

    The Copperphone by Placid Audio is a vintage character effect microphone. Unlike full range high fidelity microphones, it operates within a limited bandwidth of frequencies which imparts a compelling nostalgic quality on the signal. Some might compare the sound to an AM radio or an old telephone... The sound is achieved through a combination of the microphone’s element and a mechanical filtering device. The element is rear ported into a hollow resonant chamber and as sound passes through the diaphragm into the chamber, upper midrange frequencies are accentuated while low and high frequencies are reduced. The Copperphone can be used as a stand-alone mic on vocals or any other instrument to create an all-out, attention-grabbing sonic effect. Or it can be used in conjunction with a more traditional mic and the resulting signals can be blended together for subtle character and midrange enhancement. Sound samples of the Copperphone on vocals and various instruments can be heard here: https://www.placidaudio.com/products/copperphone/ The critically acclaimed Copperphone is the worlds most popular vintage effect microphone and used by hundreds of professionals and vocalists around the world. Here are just a few notable users: Norah Jones (Norah Jones) Sam Smith (Sam Smith, 2014 Grammy Winner) Annie Clark (St. Vincent, 2015 Grammy Winner) Sean Lennon (Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger, Cibo Matto) Beck (Beck) Jack White (Raconteurs, The White Stripes) Dan Auerbach (The Black Keys) Tom Petty (Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers) Geddy Lee (Rush)
  2. The Copperphone by Placid Audio

    The Copperphone by Placid Audio is a vintage character effect microphone. Unlike full range high fidelity microphones, it operates within a limited bandwidth of frequencies which imparts a compelling nostalgic quality on the signal. Some might compare the sound to an AM radio or an old telephone... The sound is achieved through a combination of the microphone’s element and a mechanical filtering device. The element is rear ported into a hollow resonant chamber and as sound passes through the diaphragm into the chamber, upper midrange frequencies are accentuated while low and high frequencies are reduced. The Copperphone can be used as a stand-alone mic on vocals or any other instrument to create an all-out, attention-grabbing sonic effect. Or it can be used in conjunction with a more traditional mic and the resulting signals can be blended together for subtle character and midrange enhancement. Sound samples of the Copperphone on vocals and various instruments can be heard here: https://www.placidaudio.com/products/copperphone/ The critically acclaimed Copperphone is the worlds most popular vintage effect microphone and used by hundreds of professionals and vocalists around the world. Here are just a few notable users: Norah Jones (Norah Jones) Sam Smith (Sam Smith, 2014 Grammy Winner) Annie Clark (St. Vincent, 2015 Grammy Winner) Sean Lennon (Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger, Cibo Matto) Beck (Beck) Jack White (Raconteurs, The White Stripes) Dan Auerbach (The Black Keys) Tom Petty (Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers) Geddy Lee (Rush)
  3. Voice Teacher Training - Priscila da Costa

    Congratulations to Priscila da Costa. Our new TVS Certified Instructor in Luxembourg. Priscila da Costa trains 40 hours for TVS Certification in Seattle, WA with Robert Lunte. She is now an expert in the TVS Method and is prepared to help singers around the world. https://thevocaliststudio.com/tvs-certified-instructor-program/ I am very impressed with what I saw and heard during your teacher training. You will be GREAT! Super proud and your students are fortunate to have you. Be sure to listen to the last chorus, it is amazing. Priscila da Costa is a TVS Certified Instructor from Luxembourg. This is her original song, "Twisted Mind" that we worked on together in preparation for her EP release and this video.
  4. Congratulations to Priscila da Costa. Our new TVS Certified Instructor in Luxembourg. Priscila da Costa trains 40 hours for TVS Certification in Seattle, WA with Robert Lunte. She is now an expert in the TVS Method and is prepared to help singers around the world. https://thevocaliststudio.com/tvs-certified-instructor-program/ I am very impressed with what I saw and heard during your teacher training. You will be GREAT! Super proud and your students are fortunate to have you. Be sure to listen to the last chorus, it is amazing. Priscila da Costa is a TVS Certified Instructor from Luxembourg. This is her original song, "Twisted Mind" that we worked on together in preparation for her EP release and this video. View full articles
  5. Congratulations to Priscila da Costa. Our new TVS Certified Instructor in Luxembourg. Priscila da Costa trains 40 hours for TVS Certification in Seattle, WA with Robert Lunte. She is now an expert in the TVS Method and is prepared to help singers around the world. https://thevocaliststudio.com/tvs-certified-instructor-program/ I am very impressed with what I saw and heard during your teacher training. You will be GREAT! Super proud and your students are fortunate to have you. Be sure to listen to the last chorus, it is amazing. Priscila da Costa is a TVS Certified Instructor from Luxembourg. This is her original song, "Twisted Mind" that we worked on together in preparation for her EP release and this video.
  6. Don't wait to train your singing, get started now. Stop procrastinating. Too often students want to wait until they have completed the course, read the book and feel the understand everything before actually starting with the physical training. DON'T DO THIS! It can quickly become a subconscious excuse for procrastinating. As you take the course and read the book, you also need to learn via kinesthetics, or learn by doing it, feeling it, hearing it and more.
  7. Don't wait to train your singing, get started now. Stop procrastinating. Too often students want to wait until they have completed the course, read the book and feel they understand everything before actually starting with the physical training. DON'T DO THIS! It can quickly become a subconscious excuse for procrastinating. As you take the course and read the book, you also need to learn via kinesthetics, or learn by doing it, feeling it, hearing it and more. View full articles
  8. There’s nothing more intimidating than a blank piece of paper. Starting the process of writing a new song can take just as long as finishing it. So here’s seven tips to help you speed up your songwriting. 1. Work in a group, then alone Having a few people to bounce ideas around with helps the creative process get started. After you’ve got your song started, the democratic process is more likely to slow you down. If you’re writing songs as part of a band, it can be better to go and complete your parts individually once you’ve gotten the overall idea in place. 2. Drink alcohol, then coffee Research has shown that drinking alcohol boosts your creativity, but makes it hard to focus. Coffee, and other drinks containing caffeine, has the opposite effect. For your brainstorming session, loosen up with a few drinks. This works especially well if combined with the first tip, but be careful not to get carried away and turn it into a drinking session. Once you’ve sat down to start writing the ideas you have onto paper, fire up the kettle. 3. Give chance a chance After a long music career, you might find that all of your songs are starting to sound the same. There’s nothing wrong with having a recognisable sound, but you don’t want to get stale. Shake things up by writing different elements of songs onto pieces of paper, such as keys, lyrical themes, and so on. Place them into a hat and draw five at random. Force yourself to use these, no matter how badly they seem to go together. The results can be surprisingly good - and more importantly they help you to think outside of your usual boundaries. 4. Write somewhere different Creativity doesn’t exist in a void. If you want to be inspired, go for a long walk somewhere far away from your usual haunts. The change of scenery, fresh air and act of walking itself can be great for generating new ideas. If nothing else, it gives you a chance to let yourself relax. Stress is a major impediment to creativity. 5. Learn your music theory I don’t care how unappealing this seems. You might think that learning theory chokes your freedom or that it’s boring. However, if you don’t know what the rules around music are, it’s impossible to break them in a way which is both purposeful and well-executed. This applies no matter what genre you’re in. For example, my own personal foray into EDM was vastly improved when I started learning about cadence, a concept from choral music. 6. Steal from other songs Now let me just clarify something before we go any further. I am absolutely not telling you to copy somebody else’s song in it’s entirety and try to pass it off as your own. That’s not songwriting, and you’re unlikely to get away with it for very long. What you can do, is jot down interesting chord progressions, licks and lyrics. Playing around with these later, such as using inverted versions of the chords, trying it in a different key or modulating can lead to something brand new as the changes you’ve made will lead to a naturally different conclusion. 7. Use good notation software Writing music by hand can take quite a while, and you can’t always check to see if it sounds right straight away. By using notation software, such as Sibelius, or if you can’t read music, just programming the notes into a digital audio workstation (DAW) can transform your songwriting process completely, as it’s quite easy to quickly change sections of your music without having to rewrite every single note. Armed with these tricks, your songwriting skills will change practically overnight. It doesn’t matter if you apply all of them at once (although that isn’t entirely practical) or try them out a few at a time. Your own process is going to be a factor in this, so perhaps some of them won’t be entirely applicable. Don’t fret about this, just do the ones that feel ‘right’ to you. This post was written by Zac Green from popular music blog ZingInstruments.com
  9. There’s nothing more intimidating than a blank piece of paper. Starting the process of writing a new song can take just as long as finishing it. So here’s seven tips to help you speed up your songwriting. This post was written by Zac Green from popular music blog ZingInstruments.com There’s nothing more intimidating than a blank piece of paper. Starting the process of writing a new song can take just as long as finishing it. So here’s seven tips to help you speed up your songwriting. 1. Work in a group, then alone Having a few people to bounce ideas around with helps the creative process get started. After you’ve got your song started, the democratic process is more likely to slow you down. If you’re writing songs as part of a band, it can be better to go and complete your parts individually once you’ve gotten the overall idea in place. 2. Drink alcohol, then coffee Research has shown that drinking alcohol boosts your creativity, but makes it hard to focus. Coffee, and other drinks containing caffeine, has the opposite effect. For your brainstorming session, loosen up with a few drinks. This works especially well if combined with the first tip, but be careful not to get carried away and turn it into a drinking session. Once you’ve sat down to start writing the ideas you have onto paper, fire up the kettle. 3. Give chance a chance After a long music career, you might find that all of your songs are starting to sound the same. There’s nothing wrong with having a recognisable sound, but you don’t want to get stale. Shake things up by writing different elements of songs onto pieces of paper, such as keys, lyrical themes, and so on. Place them into a hat and draw five at random. Force yourself to use these, no matter how badly they seem to go together. The results can be surprisingly good - and more importantly they help you to think outside of your usual boundaries. 4. Write somewhere different Creativity doesn’t exist in a void. If you want to be inspired, go for a long walk somewhere far away from your usual haunts. The change of scenery, fresh air and act of walking itself can be great for generating new ideas. If nothing else, it gives you a chance to let yourself relax. Stress is a major impediment to creativity. 5. Learn your music theory I don’t care how unappealing this seems. You might think that learning theory chokes your freedom or that it’s boring. However, if you don’t know what the rules around music are, it’s impossible to break them in a way which is both purposeful and well-executed. This applies no matter what genre you’re in. For example, my own personal foray into EDM was vastly improved when I started learning about cadence, a concept from choral music. 6. Steal from other songs Now let me just clarify something before we go any further. I am absolutely not telling you to copy somebody else’s song in it’s entirety and try to pass it off as your own. That’s not songwriting, and you’re unlikely to get away with it for very long. What you can do, is jot down interesting chord progressions, licks and lyrics. Playing around with these later, such as using inverted versions of the chords, trying it in a different key or modulating can lead to something brand new as the changes you’ve made will lead to a naturally different conclusion. 7. Use good notation software Writing music by hand can take quite a while, and you can’t always check to see if it sounds right straight away. By using notation software, such as Sibelius, or if you can’t read music, just programming the notes into a digital audio workstation (DAW) can transform your songwriting process completely, as it’s quite easy to quickly change sections of your music without having to rewrite every single note. Armed with these tricks, your songwriting skills will change practically overnight. It doesn’t matter if you apply all of them at once (although that isn’t entirely practical) or try them out a few at a time. Your own process is going to be a factor in this, so perhaps some of them won’t be entirely applicable. Don’t fret about this, just do the ones that feel ‘right’ to you. This post was written by Zac Green from popular music blog ZingInstruments.com View full articles
  10. David Bowie - How To Sing Like "ZIGGY"!

    This is a lesson that gives two simple tips on how to capture a David Bowie vocal color. There is a lot more involved than these two ideas, but this should be helpful. Be sure to view the two performances of "Space Oddity" & "Life On Mars". Learn More: http://www.TheVocalistStudio.com.
  11. This is a lesson that gives two simple tips on how to capture a David Bowie vocal color. There is a lot more involved than these two ideas, but this should be helpful. Be sure to view the two performances of "Space Oddity" & "Life On Mars". Learn More: http://www.TheVocalistStudio.com. View full articles
  12. An excerpt from the 2nd webinar with Robert Lunte & Draven Grey. In this excerpt, Robert Lunte explains his unique perspective on support for singing. There are two sources of support when singing. When we understand that, doors will open to reveal the need to train the musculature for singing. View full articles
  13. An excerpt from the 2nd webinar with Robert Lunte & Draven Grey. In this excerpt, Robert Lunte explains his unique perspective on support for singing. There are two sources of support when singing. When we understand that, doors will open to reveal the need to train the musculature for singing.
  14. Robert Lunte from The Vocalist Studio provides an overview of the significance of the Bernoulli effect in singing and how understanding this principle, can help you to train more efficiently and gain more progress as a singer. This excerpt is from the 2nd webinar with Draven Grey.
  15. Robert Lunte from The Vocalist Studio provides an overview of the significance of the Bernoulli effect in singing and how understanding this principle, can help you to train more efficiently and gain more progress as a singer. This excerpt is from the 2nd webinar with Draven Grey. View full articles
  16. Hello singers! Please give me your honest opinion and take your time for constructive criticism if needed. I did my best and have just recently switched over to softer music! Here it is, its a little about 1 minute
  17. Review my singing

    No one has ever told me HONESTLY what they think about my singing voice. I'm scared to share with friends because some people I show act like it's bad but they are just being polite about it. So please someone just tell me what I need to work on so I can perfect my passion and share it with friends! https://m.soundcloud.com/illwill6
  18. The Four Pillars of Singing now available as a one-time purchase for lifetime access. https://thevocaliststudio.com/the-four-pillars-of-singing/
  19. Vocalists

    Hello I am an EDM club music producer, specialising in writing music and lyrics. I am looking for talented vocalists to collaborate in future ventures. If you are interested please send a sample of your work to the following email address. art.music.tales3@gmail.com I look forward to working with you. Tal3s
  20. CLICK THE MENU ON THE TOP LEFT CORNER TO REVEAL ALL THE VIDEOS.
  21. No Pain, No Gain With Singing!

    You can NOT become a better singer by only experiencing the pleasure of training and singing. Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. Martin Luther King, Jr. To belittle knowledge and the way things work, is a popular tactic that is occasionally seen by some people in the singing industry. It is interesting to note that people who make the "less knowledge and understanding is not very important to learning how to sing", argument all suspiciously have one thing in common. They don't have a product to sell and/or if they do, the offering lacks depth. They don't choose to explain how and why the singing voice does what it does. You will never see CVI, EVTS, TVS or programs that offer some scientific insights publish a video or forum post that makes the claim, "... you don't have to know all that complex stuff, just let your inner feelings carry you through. That's all you need. It should never be hard, it should always be easy. You can just will it to happen. Don't bother learning any of the science of singing"... The world's best training programs will never say that. There are two things that motivate people. Pain and pleasure. Some people like to be given permission to avoid all the pain from voice training and learning how to sing. Promise them that they can learn to sing better without any "pain", ( practice, commitment, doing the same thing over and over again, reading a book, paying attention to a lesson, understanding a methodology, understanding how vowels work, etc... ), and they happily get on board. They don't want any "pain" associated with training or learning how to sing better. They only want instant gratification and pleasure. By no means is everyone like this. However, for those that do respond to that message, there will always be someone there to "sell" it to them.
  22. No Pain, No Gain With Singing!

    You can NOT become a better singer by only experiencing the pleasure of training and singing. Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. Martin Luther King, Jr. To belittle knowledge and the way things work, is a popular tactic that is occasionally seen by some people in the singing industry. It is interesting to note that people who make the "less knowledge and understanding is not very important to learning how to sing", argument all suspiciously have one thing in common. They don't have a product to sell and/or if they do, the offering lacks depth. They don't choose to explain how and why the singing voice does what it does. You will never see CVI, EVTS, TVS or programs that offer some scientific insights publish a video or forum post that makes the claim, "... you don't have to know all that complex stuff, just let your inner feelings carry you through. That's all you need. It should never be hard, it should always be easy. You can just will it to happen. Don't bother learning any of the science of singing"... The world's best training programs will never say that. There are two things that motivate people. Pain and pleasure. Some people like to be given permission to avoid all the pain from voice training and learning how to sing. Promise them that they can learn to sing better without any "pain", ( practice, commitment, doing the same thing over and over again, reading a book, paying attention to a lesson, understanding a methodology, understanding how vowels work, etc... ), and they happily get on board. They don't want any "pain" associated with training or learning how to sing better. They only want instant gratification and pleasure. By no means is everyone like this. However, for those that do respond to that message, there will always be someone there to "sell" it to them. View full articles
  23. ROBERT LUNTE & JAMES LUGO Q&A WEBINAR!

    THE MODERN VOCALIST WORLD PRESENTS ROBERT LUNTE & JAMES LUGO Q&A WEBINAR FREE Q&A on singing and voice training! That's the agenda! April 6th, 1:00 PST / 4:00 EST ... Attend & Have a Chance to Win a FREE EV PL-80 Microphone! Click magic button below to register
  24. MAESTRO DAVID KYLE THE WINDOW OF FAME Vocal teacher for all styles for over 50 years, David Kyle, The “Maestro” became a local Seattle icon and was considered by the industry to be one of the best vocal instructors for contemporary singers in the world. Unique to the “Maestro’s” approach was his method for expanding vocal range into multiple “registers”, or what we would refer to today at TVS as, "Bridging & Connecting". Maestro was also keen on eliminating psychological barriers that hinder singers’ freedom of expression, by use of creative visualization techniques and development of healthy auditory imagery for singing. Use of amplification and embracing technology was also an important part of the “David Kyle” training experience that carries over to TVS training with Robert Lunte as well. In addition to these details, Robert Lunte's vocal training program, The Four Pillars of Singing, found at this web site, offers 10 of Maestro Kyle's vocal workouts. Another 22 original vocal workouts developed by Robert Lunte are added to The Four Pillars of Singing training program with slow and fast versions of every workout to accommodate different student's levels of experience. All together, The Four Pillars of Singing offers a total of 32 vocal workouts with 64 different options to explore and train your voice. One day, Nate Burch, one of Robert Lunte's students from Seattle, came to the lesson with an old coffee stained piece of paper that had a hand written, transcribed lecture from Maestro Kyle on it. An excerpt from that lecture is shared below as well as popular quotes that Maestro Kyle used to use with all his students. The complete lecture is provided inside The Four Pillars of Singing Hard Copy Book and training system as part of the tribute to Maestro Kyle that Robert Lunte added to The Four Pillars of Singing. Maestro David Kyle & Robert Lunte - The Vocalist Studio MAESTRO DAVID P. KYLE LECTURE: Those sounds which seem to ring the most are usually the best. Those which seem the roundest are usually the best. Those which seem to resonate are usually the best. Those which seem to echo are usually the best. So listen out into the theater and see if they are echoing, and if they are round, and they are resonant. Connect your notes and don’t be afraid. There are two kinds of stars. There are “stars” and there are “superstars.” The star no matter how he tries he just can’t seem to become a superstar. He’s great, great, great, great, but along comes a Caruso, or a Lanza, or a Gigli, and he can’t quite get over the hurdle. It’s because of one simple thing. The star sings, and when he’s singing he listens to himself; and while he’s listening he shapes it; and he opinionates it; and he shapes it around. If it isn’t round enough he rounds it more. And that sounds logical doesn’t it? It’s wrong! The superstar pictures the sound and knows what he wants to hear before he makes it! Singing is more the concept than anything. If we’ve got the right idea, then the muscles as they train more and more they become like a reflex and the reflexes respond to the image. Even if you’re trained beautifully and your image is a fear that you haven’t got high notes and it’ll never get there the reflexes won’t respond no matter how well trained you are. The epitome of it is you can say singing is absolutely mental. In the process of getting to realize that you have to take a lot of physical steps before you begin to see it, but it is true! The singer has to be in the consciousness and the mood. How does one establish a consciousness and a mood? You tend to become as you act. So if you pretend and try to get your feelings to act as you think they would act if you were doing it, then you’re getting in the consciousness. But if our consciousness is only on body and physical things then our mind is... The rest of the lecture offers another 5 pages of incredible insights about how the mind controls the singing voice. Read the entire lecture in The Four Pillars of Singing hard copy book, eBook & course work at this web site. Maestro David Kyle - The Vocalist Studio The Four Pillars of Singing With 12 of the Key Vocal Workouts Maestro David Kyle taught! Maestro David Kyle Quotes “Good singers sing and listen, Great singers listen, then sing” “Good speech is half sung, but good singing is not half spoken.” “Wear the world like a loose garment. Don’t let it tighten in on you.” “Suppose you were learning to drive a car. Would it be better to learn on a road with no obstructions?” “Every negation is a blessing in disguise.” “The art of the art is the art that conceals the art.” “He who would know aught of art must first learn and then take his ease.” “When you open up you should be able to see light from both ends.” “Feel like you are singing with your whole body.” “Your reflexes respond to your image.” “The reflexes respond to the imagination.” “Listen away from yourself.” “Sing on the balls of your feet, like the American Indian.” “Burn Bridges and don’t look back.” “Listen away from yourself, right out into the auditorium.” “Singing is both a science and an art. All art is all imagination and you cannot fix that.” “You have to believe you will receive before you receive and then you will get it.” “Visualize you are already what you want to be. Act as if you are that, and you will become it.” “If you always notice what you are while trying to get there, you’ll never get there.” “Start as if the sound begins before the breath.” “The end is in the beginning, and the beginning is in the end.” “It’s not a game I’m playing! If you think that you’re short changing yourself.” “People don’t get tired of their work; they get tired of the resistance to their work.” “Forever diet the voice. Diet the voice; diet the mind; diet the spirit; diet everything but your income!” “Feel like your whole self is all a part of the sound, like the full violin is just vibrating.” “Imagine the sound you want, picture the sound you want.” “Open up the entire body and see the light through both ends!” “Breath, pause, release the jaw, visualize the sound you want, and sing to the back of (Carnegie Hall).” “We don’t let attitudes control us, we control them!” “Only babies are victims of moods!” “Let the sound flow right over the roof of the mouth into the masque.” “Bowels up, vowels forward.” “Some day you’re going to stand up and say, ‘This is me’ and go!” “We tend to become as we act.” “Attitude is everything in everything.” “Every time you find your thinking going to the strain or the resistance, immediately create mentally the sound that you want, hear what you want.” “And remember you have a beautiful voice. At your worst you sound better than many of them at their best!” “Just don’t sound like everyone else!” “And tell it your singing marvelous, you’re singing wonderfully!” “Sing Away from yourself, to something.” “Listen, then sing!” “Way to go Baby!” Maestro David Kyle passed on Saturday, November 27th of 2004 OTHER VOICE COACHES OF ROBERT LUNTE... View full articles
  25. MAESTRO DAVID KYLE THE WINDOW OF FAME Vocal teacher for all styles for over 50 years, David Kyle, The “Maestro” became a local Seattle icon and was considered by the industry to be one of the best vocal instructors for contemporary singers in the world. Unique to the “Maestro’s” approach was his method for expanding vocal range into multiple “registers”, or what we would refer to today at TVS as, "Bridging & Connecting". Maestro was also keen on eliminating psychological barriers that hinder singers’ freedom of expression, by use of creative visualization techniques and development of healthy auditory imagery for singing. Use of amplification and embracing technology was also an important part of the “David Kyle” training experience that carries over to TVS training with Robert Lunte as well. In addition to these details, Robert Lunte's vocal training program, The Four Pillars of Singing, found at this web site, offers 10 of Maestro Kyle's vocal workouts. Another 22 original vocal workouts developed by Robert Lunte are added to The Four Pillars of Singing training program with slow and fast versions of every workout to accommodate different student's levels of experience. All together, The Four Pillars of Singing offers a total of 32 vocal workouts with 64 different options to explore and train your voice. One day, Nate Burch, one of Robert Lunte's students from Seattle, came to the lesson with an old coffee stained piece of paper that had a hand written, transcribed lecture from Maestro Kyle on it. An excerpt from that lecture is shared below as well as popular quotes that Maestro Kyle used to use with all his students. The complete lecture is provided inside The Four Pillars of Singing Hard Copy Book and training system as part of the tribute to Maestro Kyle that Robert Lunte added to The Four Pillars of Singing. Maestro David Kyle & Robert Lunte - The Vocalist Studio MAESTRO DAVID P. KYLE LECTURE: Those sounds which seem to ring the most are usually the best. Those which seem the roundest are usually the best. Those which seem to resonate are usually the best. Those which seem to echo are usually the best. So listen out into the theater and see if they are echoing, and if they are round, and they are resonant. Connect your notes and don’t be afraid. There are two kinds of stars. There are “stars” and there are “superstars.” The star no matter how he tries he just can’t seem to become a superstar. He’s great, great, great, great, but along comes a Caruso, or a Lanza, or a Gigli, and he can’t quite get over the hurdle. It’s because of one simple thing. The star sings, and when he’s singing he listens to himself; and while he’s listening he shapes it; and he opinionates it; and he shapes it around. If it isn’t round enough he rounds it more. And that sounds logical doesn’t it? It’s wrong! The superstar pictures the sound and knows what he wants to hear before he makes it! Singing is more the concept than anything. If we’ve got the right idea, then the muscles as they train more and more they become like a reflex and the reflexes respond to the image. Even if you’re trained beautifully and your image is a fear that you haven’t got high notes and it’ll never get there the reflexes won’t respond no matter how well trained you are. The epitome of it is you can say singing is absolutely mental. In the process of getting to realize that you have to take a lot of physical steps before you begin to see it, but it is true! The singer has to be in the consciousness and the mood. How does one establish a consciousness and a mood? You tend to become as you act. So if you pretend and try to get your feelings to act as you think they would act if you were doing it, then you’re getting in the consciousness. But if our consciousness is only on body and physical things then our mind is... The rest of the lecture offers another 5 pages of incredible insights about how the mind controls the singing voice. Read the entire lecture in The Four Pillars of Singing hard copy book, eBook & course work at this web site. Maestro David Kyle - The Vocalist Studio The Four Pillars of Singing With 12 of the Key Vocal Workouts Maestro David Kyle taught! Maestro David Kyle Quotes “Good singers sing and listen, Great singers listen, then sing” “Good speech is half sung, but good singing is not half spoken.” “Wear the world like a loose garment. Don’t let it tighten in on you.” “Suppose you were learning to drive a car. Would it be better to learn on a road with no obstructions?” “Every negation is a blessing in disguise.” “The art of the art is the art that conceals the art.” “He who would know aught of art must first learn and then take his ease.” “When you open up you should be able to see light from both ends.” “Feel like you are singing with your whole body.” “Your reflexes respond to your image.” “The reflexes respond to the imagination.” “Listen away from yourself.” “Sing on the balls of your feet, like the American Indian.” “Burn Bridges and don’t look back.” “Listen away from yourself, right out into the auditorium.” “Singing is both a science and an art. All art is all imagination and you cannot fix that.” “You have to believe you will receive before you receive and then you will get it.” “Visualize you are already what you want to be. Act as if you are that, and you will become it.” “If you always notice what you are while trying to get there, you’ll never get there.” “Start as if the sound begins before the breath.” “The end is in the beginning, and the beginning is in the end.” “It’s not a game I’m playing! If you think that you’re short changing yourself.” “People don’t get tired of their work; they get tired of the resistance to their work.” “Forever diet the voice. Diet the voice; diet the mind; diet the spirit; diet everything but your income!” “Feel like your whole self is all a part of the sound, like the full violin is just vibrating.” “Imagine the sound you want, picture the sound you want.” “Open up the entire body and see the light through both ends!” “Breath, pause, release the jaw, visualize the sound you want, and sing to the back of (Carnegie Hall).” “We don’t let attitudes control us, we control them!” “Only babies are victims of moods!” “Let the sound flow right over the roof of the mouth into the masque.” “Bowels up, vowels forward.” “Some day you’re going to stand up and say, ‘This is me’ and go!” “We tend to become as we act.” “Attitude is everything in everything.” “Every time you find your thinking going to the strain or the resistance, immediately create mentally the sound that you want, hear what you want.” “And remember you have a beautiful voice. At your worst you sound better than many of them at their best!” “Just don’t sound like everyone else!” “And tell it your singing marvelous, you’re singing wonderfully!” “Sing Away from yourself, to something.” “Listen, then sing!” “Way to go Baby!” Maestro David Kyle passed on Saturday, November 27th of 2004 OTHER VOICE COACHES OF ROBERT LUNTE...