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Found 308 results

  1. I made one of these last year. What are you vocal or musical goals for this year? 1. Improve breath support, because it is something that limits me. 2. For me, the next on my list is range increase. I'm at the point now where my style would benefit by more range, and I think other things are now strong enough to where I can really focus on range. 3. Be able to play 7 songs on the guitar while singing. 4. Pick back up Piano lessons 5. Produce first cover song using audio software. 6. Continue learning songs by ear.
  2. I am sure I read something on the net about this, something to do with memory mapping or something like that Is it true?
  3. Hello , This is my first publication i little bit nervous i want to know your impressions about this song and Thank you !!
  4. This is a song I've been having my more advanced students study and work through. The guy has impecable technique through most, if not all, of the song. I usually use this as a great song for practicing tuning the formant when they get tired of going through the exercises. He rides the line between light-mass head voice and full voice all the way to belting, all the while keeping great placement. As some of you know, when you're tuned well (especially in head voice), adding in chest voice muscles, dampening, twang, distortion, and just about any other sound color is much more simple. This song is an incredible example of that tuning and manipulation of the voice. It's worth studying and attempting to mimic.
  5. Hey there! I just want to show you this website that has a bunch of free vocal exercises. Ive been using them for a couple of weeks now and they are really good! here it is: http://jacobsvocalacademy.com/vocalexercises/
  6. The answer is: Dealing with something serious like that cannot be self-served. Nevertheless, one of the commercials on weight loss for men says: “If you could do it alone, you would’ve done it already.” - Harvey Brooker Indeed, but some people still think that if they knew the diagnosis and somewhat (in theory) how it could be treated, they would have attempted fixing their vocal issues by themselves… The fact is that any voice problem, by definition, is already an internal problem; and thus, has to be treated very seriously and by a qualified voice specialist. The work with a damaged voice is usually very detailed and very intense, which applies to both sides: The injured client and the voice repair specialist. Without the guidance of a highly qualified professional, it is virtually impossible for the sufferer to lift their voice and re-channel it into the different set of muscles altogether; and on top of that, put those muscles (facial and abdominals) to work in full conjunction and coordination with each other. The above formula would allow the person to release their vocal anatomy from the pressure of the sound; and thus, allow the bruised throat and the vocal cords to heal. Moreover, the person has to adapt a new way of speaking, as well as singing (where applicable). It could be very much so equivalent to the modification of a whole “blueprint” of the person in question. Let’s say that a “dancer” was dancing for quite a few years with the feet inwards instead of outwards. Nevertheless, the dancer had gotten used to it and even felt quite comfortable with it until such time that his/her ankles and knees started to give out. So now, we have to restructure the feet position in order to save the dancer’s joints; and, as a side effect, finally teach him/her how to dance complying with professional standards and how not to damage the structural components of their body. In this case, (and as well as in any other case), we will, first of all, be teaching the brain to think differently and translate that thinking into the physical body (first in the slow-motion and then on an “automatic pilot”, so to speak). This methodology has similarities with what’s called Neural linguistic Programing. The above discipline advocates that, via special skill application, it could change and “replace” the certain modality of the certain behavior in one’s brain. As you see, my reader, it sounds pretty complex. Therefore, it never ceases to amaze me when after just an introductory session, my potential client is revealing to me that he is ready to practice by himself and quite prepared to work really hard on his own…? I’m sorry to say, but I find that a little ridiculous (to put it mildly). It would be the same as if the person would meet with a brain surgeon, who (granted) would explain in reasonable details what exactly the surgical procedure would entail; and then the patient (who is in need of a brain surgery) would decide that he, somehow, would be able to perform it himself, on his own, and at home…? Sounds funny, doesn’t it? It does indeed. But I do hear it quite often and I hope that people are thinking that way only because of the financial strain and not out of complete ignorance. On top of it, some of them are going to regular vocal coaches to seek help with their injured voice. I consider the regular vocal coaches, at best, equivalent to a regular physician who knows something about (let’s say) brain surgery, but never got specialized in it. If in real sense, (God forbid) you would need brain surgery, would you want your family physician to perform it, or you would rather hire a highly qualified brain surgeon to perform it? The above is your quiz for today. Enjoy your food for thought!
  7. Indeed, but some people still think that if they knew the diagnosis and somewhat (in theory) how it could be treated, they would have attempted fixing their vocal issues by themselves… The fact is that any voice problem, by definition, is already an internal problem; and thus, has to be treated very seriously and by a qualified voice specialist. The work with a damaged voice is usually very detailed and very intense, which applies to both sides: The injured client and the voice repair specialist. The answer is: Dealing with something serious like that cannot be self-served. Nevertheless, one of the commercials on weight loss for men says: “If you could do it alone, you would’ve done it already.” - Harvey Brooker Indeed, but some people still think that if they knew the diagnosis and somewhat (in theory) how it could be treated, they would have attempted fixing their vocal issues by themselves… The fact is that any voice problem, by definition, is already an internal problem; and thus, has to be treated very seriously and by a qualified voice specialist. The work with a damaged voice is usually very detailed and very intense, which applies to both sides: The injured client and the voice repair specialist. Without the guidance of a highly qualified professional, it is virtually impossible for the sufferer to lift their voice and re-channel it into the different set of muscles altogether; and on top of that, put those muscles (facial and abdominals) to work in full conjunction and coordination with each other. The above formula would allow the person to release their vocal anatomy from the pressure of the sound; and thus, allow the bruised throat and the vocal cords to heal. Moreover, the person has to adapt a new way of speaking, as well as singing (where applicable). It could be very much so equivalent to the modification of a whole “blueprint” of the person in question. Let’s say that a “dancer” was dancing for quite a few years with the feet inwards instead of outwards. Nevertheless, the dancer had gotten used to it and even felt quite comfortable with it until such time that his/her ankles and knees started to give out. So now, we have to restructure the feet position in order to save the dancer’s joints; and, as a side effect, finally teach him/her how to dance complying with professional standards and how not to damage the structural components of their body. In this case, (and as well as in any other case), we will, first of all, be teaching the brain to think differently and translate that thinking into the physical body (first in the slow-motion and then on an “automatic pilot”, so to speak). This methodology has similarities with what’s called Neural linguistic Programing. The above discipline advocates that, via special skill application, it could change and “replace” the certain modality of the certain behavior in one’s brain. As you see, my reader, it sounds pretty complex. Therefore, it never ceases to amaze me when after just an introductory session, my potential client is revealing to me that he is ready to practice by himself and quite prepared to work really hard on his own…? I’m sorry to say, but I find that a little ridiculous (to put it mildly). It would be the same as if the person would meet with a brain surgeon, who (granted) would explain in reasonable details what exactly the surgical procedure would entail; and then the patient (who is in need of a brain surgery) would decide that he, somehow, would be able to perform it himself, on his own, and at home…? Sounds funny, doesn’t it? It does indeed. But I do hear it quite often and I hope that people are thinking that way only because of the financial strain and not out of complete ignorance. On top of it, some of them are going to regular vocal coaches to seek help with their injured voice. I consider the regular vocal coaches, at best, equivalent to a regular physician who knows something about (let’s say) brain surgery, but never got specialized in it. If in real sense, (God forbid) you would need brain surgery, would you want your family physician to perform it, or you would rather hire a highly qualified brain surgeon to perform it? The above is your quiz for today. Enjoy your food for thought! View full articles
  8. Teaching both contemporary and classical students, do you have any recommendations of a comprehensive sources for vocalises? Instead of a resource to teach singing, think of it more as a supplement for a teacher to pick vocalises from for the student. As boring as a book like that might be, I need something like that. And because I'm working with classical teachers and other contemporary teachers as well, the more exhaustive and general terminology, the better. They don't all follow the same pedagogy. I was originally just going to ask @Robert Lunte, but I figure a lot of you might have recommendations.
  9. So I just got the program today, and will pursue it throughout the summer, posting my progress here. I did some track and track exercises today, and I can tell I have quite a bit to work on. My voice is also quite bad right now, as I think I have bronchitis, so I'll keep the singing/vocalization to a minimum until I get fully better, and won't post anything new until my voice is back at 100%, but I can post this siren I did a while back when I wasn't ill. I hope you guys can give me some feedback http://vocaroo.com/i/s1Pm6POhAyI4
  10. Muffinhead suggested this poll in response to the Vocal Coach Poll I did earlier. I liked the idea, had the day off and through this together. The aim of this poll is to give a chance for more advanced singers to encourage beginning students of singing, and convey a vision for the dedication it takes to get the singing voice you desire. Hopefully no self proclaimed "singing sensations" who are actually beginners, will vote and hack the results. We got nobody hangin' out in TMVW like that though right?! no worries. The idea is, if you have dedicated yourself to training (with a coach & on your own) your singing voice for many long hours, and truly have had your talent confirmed by cheering crowds, and many genuine compliments, vote.
  11. I just watched this video, which is in TFPOS, and thought I would share it with you guys. It really makes me want to prove others wrong.
  12. I have a question about the foundation building routine, in particular the track and track exercises. How high am I supposed to do these until? I think the backing track goes until high C, but I can't produce anything except falsetto after G4. Is falsetto not OK for this exercise?
  13. Step 1. · Identify the vocal problem itself in order to get your voice back. Perhaps, you have noticed that your voice (Speaking and/or singing) is not working in the same capacity as it once was. Obviously you are puzzled and concerned. At this point, you have to come to terms that something is not the same and begin to accept that fact. Step 2. · Identify the cause of such occurrence. Please try to analyze what could have caused your voice problem in the first place. Please try to “rewind” all the possible facts, which could have lead to such an ordeal. You might think of any medical/surgical procedures you might have undergone in the not very distant past. You might think of a ball game you might have attended with your kids, or a concert of your Idol singing. In this instance, you would possibly be able to recall how excited you were then, during the events, & how loud you were cheering for the performers in the field. Also, it probably would not hurt to look at your personal relationship with your spouse and your children. Have you been shouting a lot lately? Have you, perhaps, been under a lot of stress at work and/or at home? All of the above factors (and many others) could easily aid to a voice problem. When you are in the moment, you are not paying attention how loud you speak or scream. The consequences will haunt you later. Step 3. · Do not ‘sugarcoat’ your feelings; rather, embrace it with a grain of sault. That alone will help you immensely to get your voice back in a fast and efficient manner. When you start experiencing some changes in your voice, please DO NOT pretend that nothing happened and do not convince yourself that it is just temporary and you will feel better tomorrow. Unfortunately, you might not feel better tomorrow, as the damage has already been done and it will not go away on its own. It might require some further investigation and medical (or alternative) assistance. Step 4. · Outline your goal for the best possible recovery of your vocal problem and enjoy getting there. Once you are able to face the fact that you do have a vocal problem, please embrace this fact and outline the goal to get your voice back. It might, not necessarily, be an easy road, but please try to enjoy the process towards achieving your main goal – getting your voice back.
  14. Step 1. · Identify the vocal problem itself in order to get your voice back. Perhaps, you have noticed that your voice (Speaking and/or singing) is not working in the same capacity as it once was. Obviously you are puzzled and concerned. At this point, you have to come to terms that something is not the same and begin to accept that fact. Step 1. · Identify the vocal problem itself in order to get your voice back. Perhaps, you have noticed that your voice (Speaking and/or singing) is not working in the same capacity as it once was. Obviously you are puzzled and concerned. At this point, you have to come to terms that something is not the same and begin to accept that fact. Step 2. · Identify the cause of such occurrence. Please try to analyze what could have caused your voice problem in the first place. Please try to “rewind” all the possible facts, which could have lead to such an ordeal. You might think of any medical/surgical procedures you might have undergone in the not very distant past. You might think of a ball game you might have attended with your kids, or a concert of your Idol singing. In this instance, you would possibly be able to recall how excited you were then, during the events, & how loud you were cheering for the performers in the field. Also, it probably would not hurt to look at your personal relationship with your spouse and your children. Have you been shouting a lot lately? Have you, perhaps, been under a lot of stress at work and/or at home? All of the above factors (and many others) could easily aid to a voice problem. When you are in the moment, you are not paying attention how loud you speak or scream. The consequences will haunt you later. Step 3. · Do not ‘sugarcoat’ your feelings; rather, embrace it with a grain of sault. That alone will help you immensely to get your voice back in a fast and efficient manner. When you start experiencing some changes in your voice, please DO NOT pretend that nothing happened and do not convince yourself that it is just temporary and you will feel better tomorrow. Unfortunately, you might not feel better tomorrow, as the damage has already been done and it will not go away on its own. It might require some further investigation and medical (or alternative) assistance. Step 4. · Outline your goal for the best possible recovery of your vocal problem and enjoy getting there. Once you are able to face the fact that you do have a vocal problem, please embrace this fact and outline the goal to get your voice back. It might, not necessarily, be an easy road, but please try to enjoy the process towards achieving your main goal – getting your voice back. View full articles
  15. Hi all, have not posted here for a while. I'm still studying and practicing and I've improved a lot but there's a big gap between what I can do and where I want to be. I had a few opportunities to sing while playing with people and I still sing out of tune more than I would want to (although I really improved in this sense), moreover, I don't always feel that I exactly understand my capabilities. When I picked up a guitar I've started playing with bands/people after two years of playing (a year and half of lessons and half a year practicing alone). With vocal training it seems like it would take much longer. I did have experience playing the piano before I picked up the guitar - so I already had fundamental for playing an instrument while singing takes some additional techniques that I never used (if that makes sense). Still, I'm writing because I'm somewhat frustrated... For the more experienced guys here: how many years of lessons and practicing did it take for you to be confident enough to actually start singing in a band/seriously recording?
  16. Hello I found out i have absolutley no singing voice or quality in my voice. I even listened back to when i was singing children of the damned by iron maiden and i could tell this sounds horrible. So for someone who cannot sing anything. Is it something you are just born with or something you can learn?
  17. Hi, I am new here and I hope I am not breaking the forum rules by such questions So, I am 17 years old male who really likes singing but I am curre tly confused about many things. When I was a child (11-14 years maybe), I sang in a choir and I probably had one of the highest voices (so I was classified as boy soprano), but I stopped attending the choir around the age of 13/14. However, I didn't stop singing and I sang songs that I liked. I haven't really thought about such things as voice ranges until now though. By the way, classmates keep telling me that I have unnaturally high speaking voice. I have decided to join school choir few weeks ago and, to my surprise, not only I was classified as a tenor, but also I was told that my highest note they wanted me to sing - G4 - is higher than most tenors have. Well, as I've "tested" my vocal range (without any technique, warm up or so) few days before joining the choir, I was expecting they'll tell me I am a (high) baritone. So about my voice range (C4 is middle C I hope) - my absolute minimum is probably F2, but I usually can't sing comfortably below C3, my absolute maximum is A4, but I usually can't sing it comfortably (and sometimes I can't just sing it, for example when I've sung in this height for a long time - for example now ), so I suppose G4 is my "reasonable" maximum. Another strange thing is my falsetto. I have good-sounding falsetto, but the problem is that my falsetto maximum is C5, so I usually don't need to use it, as I can sing with my "normal" voice. I really like to practice singing in my boundaries, so I often try to sing around F2 and G/A4 (which leads to temporary (I hope) unability to sing A4 and sore throat. And I don't hear any registry changes, my voice sounds the same to me in every height (I can't hear any head voice or things like that)... So my questions are: Am I right when I think I am probably a baritone? Can I damage my voice by singing in my range boundaries? Is there a hope that I'll be able to extend my range to more "tenor" height (notes A4, B4, C5), for example when I start to attend a singing teacher (I think of that, but not just because of extending range, but because I simply want to practice my voice, as people tell me I have beautiful voice...) Similar question, but about falsetto - Can I extend my falestto above C5, for example F5? Even if such things are possible (I am definitely not sure), I understand it would be long and challenging.
  18. This is my friend singing. He's a natural. I cannot even process what's going on with these Indian style trills/runs/licks. How does one develop such agility? Is that even possible to achieve? How do I even memorize these notes? You can witness this in almost any Indian song. This sounds so beautiful. Recording: Another one:
  19. belting

    HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. Hey Rob, So I noticed that there is a difference in definitions between TVS and Ken Tamplin's program. Ken Tamplin refers to head voice as a mode; basically a strong reinforced falsetto. WELL, ... IN REGARDS TO THE TRUE DEFINITION OF VOCAL MODES, THAT IS NOT A DEFINITION THAT IS AS ACCURATE AS IT NEEDS TO BE. IF WE ARE GOING TO TALK ABOUT MODES, IT IS BEST TO REFER TO THE ORIGINATORS OF PHYSICAL MODES, THE ESTILLIANS… WHICH IS MORE OR LESS WHAT THE TVS PHYSICAL MODES ARE INSPIRED BY. FALSETTO IS A PHYSICAL MODE, HEAD VOICE IS NOTHING MORE THEN A METAPHOR FOR THE UPPER REGISTER… HEAD VOICE ACTUALLY DOESN’T MEAN ANYTHING, IF YOU WANT TO BE STRICT ABOUT IT. IT IS A “PICTURE WORD” TO REFER TO THE UPPER VOICE SENSATION WE ALL HAVE… TO CALL IT A VOCAL MODE, IS TO CLAIM THAT IT IS A PHYSICAL AND TANGIBLE THING, WHICH IT ISN’T. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS ‘REINFORCED FALSETTO’. THERE IS ONLY A PHYSICAL MODE CALLED FALSETTO AND IT IS CHARACTERIZED BY A WINDY, OPEN GLOTTIS THAT ESCAPES RESPIRATION. IF THE PHONATION DOES NOT HAVE WIND, IT IS NOT FALSETTO. IF YOU “REINFORCE” A PHONATION ON A HIGH NOTE ABOVE THE BRIDGE, IT IS MORE ACCURATELY GOING TO BE VOCAL TWANG… WHICH IS ANOTHER PHYSICAL MODE. In TVS falsetto is a mode, but the head voice is just what you call notes that resonate from the head, in whatever mode you are singing. WELL DONE, THAT IS MORE OR LESS CORRECT. HOWEVER, NOTE THAT THIS DEFINITION OF MODES IS NOT JUST THE WAY TVS SEES IT. IT IS ALSO THE WAY ESTILLIANS AND CVI SEES IT. ESTILL ARE THE ORIGINATORS OF VOCAL MODES, SO PEOPLE THAT CARE TO BE ACCURATE ABOUT VOCAL MODES, TEND TO FOLLOW THEIR ORIGINAL FOUNDATION ON THE TOPIC, WHICH TVS PHYSICAL MODES DO. I prefer the TVS definition. However, I think that makes the whole bridging late vs bridging early debate between the two systems inconsistent. IS THERE A DEBATE? ... OH YA, KTVA WOULD LIKE CONSUMERS TO BELIEVE THERE IS… THERE IS NO DEBATE. TVS HAS BOTH BOTTOM UP AND TOP DOWN TECHNIQUES. THIS IS A TIRED, OLD IDEA THAT STARTED ABOUT FOUR YEARS AGO THAT HAS BEEN PROPAGATED TO CREATE CONFUSION IN THE MARKET ABOUT WHAT TVS STANDS FOR... KTVA HAS GOT A LOT OF MILEAGE OUT OF PROPAGATING THIS MISINFORMATION. IT IS COMPLETELY STUPID AND I HAVE CREATED NO LESS THEN FOUR VIDEOS TO COMBAT THE CONFUSION. Ken's criticism of what he calls late bridging seems more apt to describing some classical voice teachers who teach bridging to a falsetto mode instead of a twang mode, or metal screamers who rely on a distorted reinforced falsetto. His criticism being that early bridging over time breaks down the "mid voice," of which he doesn't define. HE TALKS A GOOD GAME AND CERTAINLY SINGS A GOOD GAME… BUT WITH ALL DUE RESPECT, IN MY OPINION AND FROM FEEDBACK FROM HIS CUSTOMERS, HE DOESN’T ALWAYS DEFINE OR EXPLAIN A GOOD GAME. IN REGARDS TO EARLY BRIDGING AND VOCAL ATROPHY… ON THIS POINT, I AGREE WITH KEN. THE LACK OF BOTTOM UP TRAINING WILL RESULT IN WEAK TA MUSCLE STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE. BOTTOM TRAINING IS ESSENTIAL TO BELTING, BUT ALSO JUST TO BASIC VOCAL HEALTH. THIS IS WHY THE NEW 4PILLARS SYSTEM HAS AN EXTENSIVE BOTTOM-UP AND BELT TRAINING EXPLANATIONS AND ROUTINES. With the TVS definition, I'd say I mostly bridge early. But it's not such a big difference it seems. I can still bring a bigger boomier sound up higher, but from learning early bridging techniques, I'm not stuck to an overly heavy phonation with constriction. It's dynamic and free. PRECISELY!!!!!!!!!!! YOU NEED BOTH APPROACHES! DIFFERENT PEOPLE NEED DIFFERENT APPROACHES BASED ON THEIR NEEDS. YOU DESCRIBED THOSE NEEDS NICELY. I TOTALLY AGREE. KNOW THIS… THE REASON ANY COACH WOULD BE LIGHT ON TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES IS SIMPLY BECAUSE TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES ARE MORE COMPLICATED TO UNDERSTAND AND TEACH. IT IS A LOT EASIER TO TEACH BOTTOM-UP TECHNIQUES. TOP-DOWN TECHNIQUES REQUIRE MORE PRECISION AND MORE UNDERSTANDING OF THE MUSCULATURE AND OTHER DETAILS. "PUSH FROM THE BOTTOM UP ON AN AH VOWEL"... IS A FAR EASIER STORY TO TELL, THEN BUILDING FROM INSIDE THE HEAD VOICE. I think part of the confusion also stems from the SLS / singing success terms, where the mixed voice is their term for twang, and head voice is defined as a strong falsetto. WHICH IS AN AWFUL DEFINITION OF TWANG… AND PAINFULLY INCORRECT. AGAIN, IF ANY OF THESE PEOPLE, WOULD BOTHER TO STUDY VOCAL MODES AS I HAVE, THEY WOULD NOT BE TALKING INACCURACIES TO CONSUMERS. SLS AND SS SEEM LIKE THE LEAST INFORMED TEACHERS SOMETIMES. TO BE SURE, THEY ARE NOT TRAINED IN VOCAL MODES AND ARE WAY OF COURSE WHEN IT COMES TO BELTING. VERY FEW PEOPLE WILL EVER BUILD A STRONG TOP REGISTER BELT WITH "SING LIKE YOU SPEAK" TYPE METHODS. It's kind of silly considering the actually mixed resonance we feel is only from around c4 to E4. Mixed voice is just a bad term. YEP… THAT IS WHY I KILLED IT IN MY “MIXED VOICE IS DEAD!” VIDEO… IT IS A TERM THAT SOME TEACHERS USE TO KEEP THEIR STUDENTS CONFUSED. THE MORE YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STUDENTS CONFUSED, THE LESS YOU HAVE TO REALLY UNDERSTAND YOUR SUBJECT MATTER AND BE ABLE TO REALLY EXPLAIN THINGS AS A TEACHER. Am I understanding this right? TOM, I THINK YOU HAVE A LOT OF THIS PRETTY SQUARED AWAY. IT SEEMS THE TVS CONTENT IS HELPING YOU TO SORT THIS ALL OUT, WHICH IS GREAT. Tom
  20. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. Hey Rob, So I noticed that there is a difference in definitions between TVS and Ken Tamplin's program. Ken Tamplin refers to head voice as a mode; basically a strong reinforced falsetto. WELL, ... IN REGARDS TO THE TRUE DEFINITION OF VOCAL MODES, THAT IS NOT A DEFINITION THAT IS AS ACCURATE AS IT NEEDS TO BE. IF WE ARE GOING TO TALK ABOUT MODES, IT IS BEST TO REFER TO THE ORIGINATORS OF PHYSICAL MODES, THE ESTILLIANS… WHICH IS MORE OR LESS WHAT THE TVS PHYSICAL MODES ARE INSPIRED BY. FALSETTO IS A PHYSICAL MODE, HEAD VOICE IS NOTHING MORE THEN A METAPHOR FOR THE UPPER REGISTER… HEAD VOICE ACTUALLY DOESN’T MEAN ANYTHING, IF YOU WANT TO BE STRICT ABOUT IT. IT IS A “PICTURE WORD” TO REFER TO THE UPPER VOICE SENSATION WE ALL HAVE… TO CALL IT A VOCAL MODE, IS TO CLAIM THAT IT IS A PHYSICAL AND TANGIBLE THING, WHICH IT ISN’T. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS ‘REINFORCED FALSETTO’. THERE IS ONLY A PHYSICAL MODE CALLED FALSETTO AND IT IS CHARACTERIZED BY A WINDY, OPEN GLOTTIS THAT ESCAPES RESPIRATION. IF THE PHONATION DOES NOT HAVE WIND, IT IS NOT FALSETTO. IF YOU “REINFORCE” A PHONATION ON A HIGH NOTE ABOVE THE BRIDGE, IT IS MORE ACCURATELY GOING TO BE VOCAL TWANG… WHICH IS ANOTHER PHYSICAL MODE. In TVS falsetto is a mode, but the head voice is just what you call notes that resonate from the head, in whatever mode you are singing. WELL DONE, THAT IS MORE OR LESS CORRECT. HOWEVER, NOTE THAT THIS DEFINITION OF MODES IS NOT JUST THE WAY TVS SEES IT. IT IS ALSO THE WAY ESTILLIANS AND CVI SEES IT. ESTILL ARE THE ORIGINATORS OF VOCAL MODES, SO PEOPLE THAT CARE TO BE ACCURATE ABOUT VOCAL MODES, TEND TO FOLLOW THEIR ORIGINAL FOUNDATION ON THE TOPIC, WHICH TVS PHYSICAL MODES DO. I prefer the TVS definition. However, I think that makes the whole bridging late vs bridging early debate between the two systems inconsistent. IS THERE A DEBATE? ... OH YA, KTVA WOULD LIKE CONSUMERS TO BELIEVE THERE IS… THERE IS NO DEBATE. TVS HAS BOTH BOTTOM UP AND TOP DOWN TECHNIQUES. THIS IS A TIRED, OLD IDEA THAT STARTED ABOUT FOUR YEARS AGO THAT HAS BEEN PROPAGATED TO CREATE CONFUSION IN THE MARKET ABOUT WHAT TVS STANDS FOR... KTVA HAS GOT A LOT OF MILEAGE OUT OF PROPAGATING THIS MISINFORMATION. IT IS COMPLETELY STUPID AND I HAVE CREATED NO LESS THEN FOUR VIDEOS TO COMBAT THE CONFUSION. Ken's criticism of what he calls late bridging seems more apt to describing some classical voice teachers who teach bridging to a falsetto mode instead of a twang mode, or metal screamers who rely on a distorted reinforced falsetto. His criticism being that early bridging over time breaks down the "mid voice," of which he doesn't define. HE TALKS A GOOD GAME AND CERTAINLY SINGS A GOOD GAME… BUT WITH ALL DUE RESPECT, IN MY OPINION AND FROM FEEDBACK FROM HIS CUSTOMERS, HE DOESN’T ALWAYS DEFINE OR EXPLAIN A GOOD GAME. IN REGARDS TO EARLY BRIDGING AND VOCAL ATROPHY… ON THIS POINT, I AGREE WITH KEN. THE LACK OF BOTTOM UP TRAINING WILL RESULT IN WEAK TA MUSCLE STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE. BOTTOM TRAINING IS ESSENTIAL TO BELTING, BUT ALSO JUST TO BASIC VOCAL HEALTH. THIS IS WHY THE NEW 4PILLARS SYSTEM HAS AN EXTENSIVE BOTTOM-UP AND BELT TRAINING EXPLANATIONS AND ROUTINES. With the TVS definition, I'd say I mostly bridge early. But it's not such a big difference it seems. I can still bring a bigger boomier sound up higher, but from learning early bridging techniques, I'm not stuck to an overly heavy phonation with constriction. It's dynamic and free. PRECISELY!!!!!!!!!!! YOU NEED BOTH APPROACHES! DIFFERENT PEOPLE NEED DIFFERENT APPROACHES BASED ON THEIR NEEDS. YOU DESCRIBED THOSE NEEDS NICELY. I TOTALLY AGREE. KNOW THIS… THE REASON ANY COACH WOULD BE LIGHT ON TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES IS SIMPLY BECAUSE TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES ARE MORE COMPLICATED TO UNDERSTAND AND TEACH. IT IS A LOT EASIER TO TEACH BOTTOM-UP TECHNIQUES. TOP-DOWN TECHNIQUES REQUIRE MORE PRECISION AND MORE UNDERSTANDING OF THE MUSCULATURE AND OTHER DETAILS. "PUSH FROM THE BOTTOM UP ON AN AH VOWEL"... IS A FAR EASIER STORY TO TELL, THEN BUILDING FROM INSIDE THE HEAD VOICE. I think part of the confusion also stems from the SLS / singing success terms, where the mixed voice is their term for twang, and head voice is defined as a strong falsetto. WHICH IS AN AWFUL DEFINITION OF TWANG… AND PAINFULLY INCORRECT. AGAIN, IF ANY OF THESE PEOPLE, WOULD BOTHER TO STUDY VOCAL MODES AS I HAVE, THEY WOULD NOT BE TALKING INACCURACIES TO CONSUMERS. SLS AND SS SEEM LIKE THE LEAST INFORMED TEACHERS SOMETIMES. TO BE SURE, THEY ARE NOT TRAINED IN VOCAL MODES AND ARE WAY OF COURSE WHEN IT COMES TO BELTING. VERY FEW PEOPLE WILL EVER BUILD A STRONG TOP REGISTER BELT WITH "SING LIKE YOU SPEAK" TYPE METHODS. It's kind of silly considering the actually mixed resonance we feel is only from around c4 to E4. Mixed voice is just a bad term. YEP… THAT IS WHY I KILLED IT IN MY “MIXED VOICE IS DEAD!” VIDEO… IT IS A TERM THAT SOME TEACHERS USE TO KEEP THEIR STUDENTS CONFUSED. THE MORE YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STUDENTS CONFUSED, THE LESS YOU HAVE TO REALLY UNDERSTAND YOUR SUBJECT MATTER AND BE ABLE TO REALLY EXPLAIN THINGS AS A TEACHER. Am I understanding this right? TOM, I THINK YOU HAVE A LOT OF THIS PRETTY SQUARED AWAY. IT SEEMS THE TVS CONTENT IS HELPING YOU TO SORT THIS ALL OUT, WHICH IS GREAT. Tom View full articles
  21. You've probably already guessed what this could be about! The year is ending in a matter of days. A great time to reflect and look forward. What have you been able to get done, this past year, and what are you looking forward to getting done by the time 2016 is wrapping up? Accomplishments for me: - Gained 2 more notes: A5, A#5 - Started practicing whistle register use, and made some progress. Been at it 3-4 weeks, and I can siren. - Got enough of a handle on overlay distortion to where I can successfully pull it out, about 75% of the time that I want to. - Started absorbing the influence I've been after since I started, about 4 years ago. Learned to start listening better to myself, and pinpointed certain things I do, which cause me to mess up a little. -Sometimes phonating on the wrong note -Vibrato not being controlled and sometimes causing me to mess up pitch (tends to happen on the last word in a line of lyrics) -Breath control Goals: - Continue working on range expansion, everyday, and start focusing more on the lower end. - Develop a usable whistle register by end of 2016. Been using it everyday for the past month. I believe I can do that by this time next year. - Learn to growl (already know how), and be able to do it consistently - Make serious progress with the 4 Pillars system. I do things like resonant tracking and quacking on a daily basis now, and video exercise routines a few times a week, but I want to do more than that. I was quacking yesterday, and tried to turn it into a siren, going as high as I could. As I went through the head range, there was a bit of an amplification there, like Rob said, caused by compression. And this is one of the reasons I need to gain control of this. - Pick back up piano, and get back up to speed with it. That's it for me. How about everyone else?
  22. I first started singing in choir class in 8th grade, and I continued doing group choir throughout high school. I also occasionally did solos for choir or at church. But ever since I graduated high school, I have only performed once at a small recital for a singing class I was in, and even that was close to two years ago. I really enjoy performing, but for these past few years I've just been hyperfocused on technique. Originally my line of thinking was, "I'll start performing seriously when I'm good enough," or, "when I get the opportunity". But lately I've been thinking, I'm just screwing myself over. If this is what I really want to do (which it is) I need to start doing it now instead of waiting for things to just magically happen. The reason I came here is because I wanted to ask for suggestions on how to practice performance skills and find opportunities to perform for people, rather than just singing random phrases of songs and doing exercises in my car all the time. I've thought about making and recording covers of songs I like. I feel like it would be much more rewarding than just simply practicing all the time, and I could also post things I've recorded on here and get feedback. I'm just not sure where to start with it. I don't have any real recording equipment except for my phone, and though I have started playing guitar recently I'm not good at it yet. But basically what I'm getting at is, I want to start doing something more with my singing now. I'm just not really sure what would be the best option for me at this point. Any advice would be appreciated.
  23. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>>
  24. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>> View full articles