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Found 290 results

  1. Hello , This is my first publication i little bit nervous i want to know your impressions about this song and Thank you !!
  2. Hey there! I just want to show you this website that has a bunch of free vocal exercises. Ive been using them for a couple of weeks now and they are really good! here it is: http://jacobsvocalacademy.com/vocalexercises/
  3. The answer is: Dealing with something serious like that cannot be self-served. Nevertheless, one of the commercials on weight loss for men says: “If you could do it alone, you would’ve done it already.” - Harvey Brooker Indeed, but some people still think that if they knew the diagnosis and somewhat (in theory) how it could be treated, they would have attempted fixing their vocal issues by themselves… The fact is that any voice problem, by definition, is already an internal problem; and thus, has to be treated very seriously and by a qualified voice specialist. The work with a damaged voice is usually very detailed and very intense, which applies to both sides: The injured client and the voice repair specialist. Without the guidance of a highly qualified professional, it is virtually impossible for the sufferer to lift their voice and re-channel it into the different set of muscles altogether; and on top of that, put those muscles (facial and abdominals) to work in full conjunction and coordination with each other. The above formula would allow the person to release their vocal anatomy from the pressure of the sound; and thus, allow the bruised throat and the vocal cords to heal. Moreover, the person has to adapt a new way of speaking, as well as singing (where applicable). It could be very much so equivalent to the modification of a whole “blueprint” of the person in question. Let’s say that a “dancer” was dancing for quite a few years with the feet inwards instead of outwards. Nevertheless, the dancer had gotten used to it and even felt quite comfortable with it until such time that his/her ankles and knees started to give out. So now, we have to restructure the feet position in order to save the dancer’s joints; and, as a side effect, finally teach him/her how to dance complying with professional standards and how not to damage the structural components of their body. In this case, (and as well as in any other case), we will, first of all, be teaching the brain to think differently and translate that thinking into the physical body (first in the slow-motion and then on an “automatic pilot”, so to speak). This methodology has similarities with what’s called Neural linguistic Programing. The above discipline advocates that, via special skill application, it could change and “replace” the certain modality of the certain behavior in one’s brain. As you see, my reader, it sounds pretty complex. Therefore, it never ceases to amaze me when after just an introductory session, my potential client is revealing to me that he is ready to practice by himself and quite prepared to work really hard on his own…? I’m sorry to say, but I find that a little ridiculous (to put it mildly). It would be the same as if the person would meet with a brain surgeon, who (granted) would explain in reasonable details what exactly the surgical procedure would entail; and then the patient (who is in need of a brain surgery) would decide that he, somehow, would be able to perform it himself, on his own, and at home…? Sounds funny, doesn’t it? It does indeed. But I do hear it quite often and I hope that people are thinking that way only because of the financial strain and not out of complete ignorance. On top of it, some of them are going to regular vocal coaches to seek help with their injured voice. I consider the regular vocal coaches, at best, equivalent to a regular physician who knows something about (let’s say) brain surgery, but never got specialized in it. If in real sense, (God forbid) you would need brain surgery, would you want your family physician to perform it, or you would rather hire a highly qualified brain surgeon to perform it? The above is your quiz for today. Enjoy your food for thought!
  4. Indeed, but some people still think that if they knew the diagnosis and somewhat (in theory) how it could be treated, they would have attempted fixing their vocal issues by themselves… The fact is that any voice problem, by definition, is already an internal problem; and thus, has to be treated very seriously and by a qualified voice specialist. The work with a damaged voice is usually very detailed and very intense, which applies to both sides: The injured client and the voice repair specialist. The answer is: Dealing with something serious like that cannot be self-served. Nevertheless, one of the commercials on weight loss for men says: “If you could do it alone, you would’ve done it already.” - Harvey Brooker Indeed, but some people still think that if they knew the diagnosis and somewhat (in theory) how it could be treated, they would have attempted fixing their vocal issues by themselves… The fact is that any voice problem, by definition, is already an internal problem; and thus, has to be treated very seriously and by a qualified voice specialist. The work with a damaged voice is usually very detailed and very intense, which applies to both sides: The injured client and the voice repair specialist. Without the guidance of a highly qualified professional, it is virtually impossible for the sufferer to lift their voice and re-channel it into the different set of muscles altogether; and on top of that, put those muscles (facial and abdominals) to work in full conjunction and coordination with each other. The above formula would allow the person to release their vocal anatomy from the pressure of the sound; and thus, allow the bruised throat and the vocal cords to heal. Moreover, the person has to adapt a new way of speaking, as well as singing (where applicable). It could be very much so equivalent to the modification of a whole “blueprint” of the person in question. Let’s say that a “dancer” was dancing for quite a few years with the feet inwards instead of outwards. Nevertheless, the dancer had gotten used to it and even felt quite comfortable with it until such time that his/her ankles and knees started to give out. So now, we have to restructure the feet position in order to save the dancer’s joints; and, as a side effect, finally teach him/her how to dance complying with professional standards and how not to damage the structural components of their body. In this case, (and as well as in any other case), we will, first of all, be teaching the brain to think differently and translate that thinking into the physical body (first in the slow-motion and then on an “automatic pilot”, so to speak). This methodology has similarities with what’s called Neural linguistic Programing. The above discipline advocates that, via special skill application, it could change and “replace” the certain modality of the certain behavior in one’s brain. As you see, my reader, it sounds pretty complex. Therefore, it never ceases to amaze me when after just an introductory session, my potential client is revealing to me that he is ready to practice by himself and quite prepared to work really hard on his own…? I’m sorry to say, but I find that a little ridiculous (to put it mildly). It would be the same as if the person would meet with a brain surgeon, who (granted) would explain in reasonable details what exactly the surgical procedure would entail; and then the patient (who is in need of a brain surgery) would decide that he, somehow, would be able to perform it himself, on his own, and at home…? Sounds funny, doesn’t it? It does indeed. But I do hear it quite often and I hope that people are thinking that way only because of the financial strain and not out of complete ignorance. On top of it, some of them are going to regular vocal coaches to seek help with their injured voice. I consider the regular vocal coaches, at best, equivalent to a regular physician who knows something about (let’s say) brain surgery, but never got specialized in it. If in real sense, (God forbid) you would need brain surgery, would you want your family physician to perform it, or you would rather hire a highly qualified brain surgeon to perform it? The above is your quiz for today. Enjoy your food for thought! View full articles
  5. So I just got the program today, and will pursue it throughout the summer, posting my progress here. I did some track and track exercises today, and I can tell I have quite a bit to work on. My voice is also quite bad right now, as I think I have bronchitis, so I'll keep the singing/vocalization to a minimum until I get fully better, and won't post anything new until my voice is back at 100%, but I can post this siren I did a while back when I wasn't ill. I hope you guys can give me some feedback http://vocaroo.com/i/s1Pm6POhAyI4
  6. Step 1. · Identify the vocal problem itself in order to get your voice back. Perhaps, you have noticed that your voice (Speaking and/or singing) is not working in the same capacity as it once was. Obviously you are puzzled and concerned. At this point, you have to come to terms that something is not the same and begin to accept that fact. Step 2. · Identify the cause of such occurrence. Please try to analyze what could have caused your voice problem in the first place. Please try to “rewind” all the possible facts, which could have lead to such an ordeal. You might think of any medical/surgical procedures you might have undergone in the not very distant past. You might think of a ball game you might have attended with your kids, or a concert of your Idol singing. In this instance, you would possibly be able to recall how excited you were then, during the events, & how loud you were cheering for the performers in the field. Also, it probably would not hurt to look at your personal relationship with your spouse and your children. Have you been shouting a lot lately? Have you, perhaps, been under a lot of stress at work and/or at home? All of the above factors (and many others) could easily aid to a voice problem. When you are in the moment, you are not paying attention how loud you speak or scream. The consequences will haunt you later. Step 3. · Do not ‘sugarcoat’ your feelings; rather, embrace it with a grain of sault. That alone will help you immensely to get your voice back in a fast and efficient manner. When you start experiencing some changes in your voice, please DO NOT pretend that nothing happened and do not convince yourself that it is just temporary and you will feel better tomorrow. Unfortunately, you might not feel better tomorrow, as the damage has already been done and it will not go away on its own. It might require some further investigation and medical (or alternative) assistance. Step 4. · Outline your goal for the best possible recovery of your vocal problem and enjoy getting there. Once you are able to face the fact that you do have a vocal problem, please embrace this fact and outline the goal to get your voice back. It might, not necessarily, be an easy road, but please try to enjoy the process towards achieving your main goal – getting your voice back.
  7. Step 1. · Identify the vocal problem itself in order to get your voice back. Perhaps, you have noticed that your voice (Speaking and/or singing) is not working in the same capacity as it once was. Obviously you are puzzled and concerned. At this point, you have to come to terms that something is not the same and begin to accept that fact. Step 1. · Identify the vocal problem itself in order to get your voice back. Perhaps, you have noticed that your voice (Speaking and/or singing) is not working in the same capacity as it once was. Obviously you are puzzled and concerned. At this point, you have to come to terms that something is not the same and begin to accept that fact. Step 2. · Identify the cause of such occurrence. Please try to analyze what could have caused your voice problem in the first place. Please try to “rewind” all the possible facts, which could have lead to such an ordeal. You might think of any medical/surgical procedures you might have undergone in the not very distant past. You might think of a ball game you might have attended with your kids, or a concert of your Idol singing. In this instance, you would possibly be able to recall how excited you were then, during the events, & how loud you were cheering for the performers in the field. Also, it probably would not hurt to look at your personal relationship with your spouse and your children. Have you been shouting a lot lately? Have you, perhaps, been under a lot of stress at work and/or at home? All of the above factors (and many others) could easily aid to a voice problem. When you are in the moment, you are not paying attention how loud you speak or scream. The consequences will haunt you later. Step 3. · Do not ‘sugarcoat’ your feelings; rather, embrace it with a grain of sault. That alone will help you immensely to get your voice back in a fast and efficient manner. When you start experiencing some changes in your voice, please DO NOT pretend that nothing happened and do not convince yourself that it is just temporary and you will feel better tomorrow. Unfortunately, you might not feel better tomorrow, as the damage has already been done and it will not go away on its own. It might require some further investigation and medical (or alternative) assistance. Step 4. · Outline your goal for the best possible recovery of your vocal problem and enjoy getting there. Once you are able to face the fact that you do have a vocal problem, please embrace this fact and outline the goal to get your voice back. It might, not necessarily, be an easy road, but please try to enjoy the process towards achieving your main goal – getting your voice back. View full articles
  8. belting

    HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. Hey Rob, So I noticed that there is a difference in definitions between TVS and Ken Tamplin's program. Ken Tamplin refers to head voice as a mode; basically a strong reinforced falsetto. WELL, ... IN REGARDS TO THE TRUE DEFINITION OF VOCAL MODES, THAT IS NOT A DEFINITION THAT IS AS ACCURATE AS IT NEEDS TO BE. IF WE ARE GOING TO TALK ABOUT MODES, IT IS BEST TO REFER TO THE ORIGINATORS OF PHYSICAL MODES, THE ESTILLIANS… WHICH IS MORE OR LESS WHAT THE TVS PHYSICAL MODES ARE INSPIRED BY. FALSETTO IS A PHYSICAL MODE, HEAD VOICE IS NOTHING MORE THEN A METAPHOR FOR THE UPPER REGISTER… HEAD VOICE ACTUALLY DOESN’T MEAN ANYTHING, IF YOU WANT TO BE STRICT ABOUT IT. IT IS A “PICTURE WORD” TO REFER TO THE UPPER VOICE SENSATION WE ALL HAVE… TO CALL IT A VOCAL MODE, IS TO CLAIM THAT IT IS A PHYSICAL AND TANGIBLE THING, WHICH IT ISN’T. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS ‘REINFORCED FALSETTO’. THERE IS ONLY A PHYSICAL MODE CALLED FALSETTO AND IT IS CHARACTERIZED BY A WINDY, OPEN GLOTTIS THAT ESCAPES RESPIRATION. IF THE PHONATION DOES NOT HAVE WIND, IT IS NOT FALSETTO. IF YOU “REINFORCE” A PHONATION ON A HIGH NOTE ABOVE THE BRIDGE, IT IS MORE ACCURATELY GOING TO BE VOCAL TWANG… WHICH IS ANOTHER PHYSICAL MODE. In TVS falsetto is a mode, but the head voice is just what you call notes that resonate from the head, in whatever mode you are singing. WELL DONE, THAT IS MORE OR LESS CORRECT. HOWEVER, NOTE THAT THIS DEFINITION OF MODES IS NOT JUST THE WAY TVS SEES IT. IT IS ALSO THE WAY ESTILLIANS AND CVI SEES IT. ESTILL ARE THE ORIGINATORS OF VOCAL MODES, SO PEOPLE THAT CARE TO BE ACCURATE ABOUT VOCAL MODES, TEND TO FOLLOW THEIR ORIGINAL FOUNDATION ON THE TOPIC, WHICH TVS PHYSICAL MODES DO. I prefer the TVS definition. However, I think that makes the whole bridging late vs bridging early debate between the two systems inconsistent. IS THERE A DEBATE? ... OH YA, KTVA WOULD LIKE CONSUMERS TO BELIEVE THERE IS… THERE IS NO DEBATE. TVS HAS BOTH BOTTOM UP AND TOP DOWN TECHNIQUES. THIS IS A TIRED, OLD IDEA THAT STARTED ABOUT FOUR YEARS AGO THAT HAS BEEN PROPAGATED TO CREATE CONFUSION IN THE MARKET ABOUT WHAT TVS STANDS FOR... KTVA HAS GOT A LOT OF MILEAGE OUT OF PROPAGATING THIS MISINFORMATION. IT IS COMPLETELY STUPID AND I HAVE CREATED NO LESS THEN FOUR VIDEOS TO COMBAT THE CONFUSION. Ken's criticism of what he calls late bridging seems more apt to describing some classical voice teachers who teach bridging to a falsetto mode instead of a twang mode, or metal screamers who rely on a distorted reinforced falsetto. His criticism being that early bridging over time breaks down the "mid voice," of which he doesn't define. HE TALKS A GOOD GAME AND CERTAINLY SINGS A GOOD GAME… BUT WITH ALL DUE RESPECT, IN MY OPINION AND FROM FEEDBACK FROM HIS CUSTOMERS, HE DOESN’T ALWAYS DEFINE OR EXPLAIN A GOOD GAME. IN REGARDS TO EARLY BRIDGING AND VOCAL ATROPHY… ON THIS POINT, I AGREE WITH KEN. THE LACK OF BOTTOM UP TRAINING WILL RESULT IN WEAK TA MUSCLE STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE. BOTTOM TRAINING IS ESSENTIAL TO BELTING, BUT ALSO JUST TO BASIC VOCAL HEALTH. THIS IS WHY THE NEW 4PILLARS SYSTEM HAS AN EXTENSIVE BOTTOM-UP AND BELT TRAINING EXPLANATIONS AND ROUTINES. With the TVS definition, I'd say I mostly bridge early. But it's not such a big difference it seems. I can still bring a bigger boomier sound up higher, but from learning early bridging techniques, I'm not stuck to an overly heavy phonation with constriction. It's dynamic and free. PRECISELY!!!!!!!!!!! YOU NEED BOTH APPROACHES! DIFFERENT PEOPLE NEED DIFFERENT APPROACHES BASED ON THEIR NEEDS. YOU DESCRIBED THOSE NEEDS NICELY. I TOTALLY AGREE. KNOW THIS… THE REASON ANY COACH WOULD BE LIGHT ON TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES IS SIMPLY BECAUSE TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES ARE MORE COMPLICATED TO UNDERSTAND AND TEACH. IT IS A LOT EASIER TO TEACH BOTTOM-UP TECHNIQUES. TOP-DOWN TECHNIQUES REQUIRE MORE PRECISION AND MORE UNDERSTANDING OF THE MUSCULATURE AND OTHER DETAILS. "PUSH FROM THE BOTTOM UP ON AN AH VOWEL"... IS A FAR EASIER STORY TO TELL, THEN BUILDING FROM INSIDE THE HEAD VOICE. I think part of the confusion also stems from the SLS / singing success terms, where the mixed voice is their term for twang, and head voice is defined as a strong falsetto. WHICH IS AN AWFUL DEFINITION OF TWANG… AND PAINFULLY INCORRECT. AGAIN, IF ANY OF THESE PEOPLE, WOULD BOTHER TO STUDY VOCAL MODES AS I HAVE, THEY WOULD NOT BE TALKING INACCURACIES TO CONSUMERS. SLS AND SS SEEM LIKE THE LEAST INFORMED TEACHERS SOMETIMES. TO BE SURE, THEY ARE NOT TRAINED IN VOCAL MODES AND ARE WAY OF COURSE WHEN IT COMES TO BELTING. VERY FEW PEOPLE WILL EVER BUILD A STRONG TOP REGISTER BELT WITH "SING LIKE YOU SPEAK" TYPE METHODS. It's kind of silly considering the actually mixed resonance we feel is only from around c4 to E4. Mixed voice is just a bad term. YEP… THAT IS WHY I KILLED IT IN MY “MIXED VOICE IS DEAD!” VIDEO… IT IS A TERM THAT SOME TEACHERS USE TO KEEP THEIR STUDENTS CONFUSED. THE MORE YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STUDENTS CONFUSED, THE LESS YOU HAVE TO REALLY UNDERSTAND YOUR SUBJECT MATTER AND BE ABLE TO REALLY EXPLAIN THINGS AS A TEACHER. Am I understanding this right? TOM, I THINK YOU HAVE A LOT OF THIS PRETTY SQUARED AWAY. IT SEEMS THE TVS CONTENT IS HELPING YOU TO SORT THIS ALL OUT, WHICH IS GREAT. Tom
  9. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. Hey Rob, So I noticed that there is a difference in definitions between TVS and Ken Tamplin's program. Ken Tamplin refers to head voice as a mode; basically a strong reinforced falsetto. WELL, ... IN REGARDS TO THE TRUE DEFINITION OF VOCAL MODES, THAT IS NOT A DEFINITION THAT IS AS ACCURATE AS IT NEEDS TO BE. IF WE ARE GOING TO TALK ABOUT MODES, IT IS BEST TO REFER TO THE ORIGINATORS OF PHYSICAL MODES, THE ESTILLIANS… WHICH IS MORE OR LESS WHAT THE TVS PHYSICAL MODES ARE INSPIRED BY. FALSETTO IS A PHYSICAL MODE, HEAD VOICE IS NOTHING MORE THEN A METAPHOR FOR THE UPPER REGISTER… HEAD VOICE ACTUALLY DOESN’T MEAN ANYTHING, IF YOU WANT TO BE STRICT ABOUT IT. IT IS A “PICTURE WORD” TO REFER TO THE UPPER VOICE SENSATION WE ALL HAVE… TO CALL IT A VOCAL MODE, IS TO CLAIM THAT IT IS A PHYSICAL AND TANGIBLE THING, WHICH IT ISN’T. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS ‘REINFORCED FALSETTO’. THERE IS ONLY A PHYSICAL MODE CALLED FALSETTO AND IT IS CHARACTERIZED BY A WINDY, OPEN GLOTTIS THAT ESCAPES RESPIRATION. IF THE PHONATION DOES NOT HAVE WIND, IT IS NOT FALSETTO. IF YOU “REINFORCE” A PHONATION ON A HIGH NOTE ABOVE THE BRIDGE, IT IS MORE ACCURATELY GOING TO BE VOCAL TWANG… WHICH IS ANOTHER PHYSICAL MODE. In TVS falsetto is a mode, but the head voice is just what you call notes that resonate from the head, in whatever mode you are singing. WELL DONE, THAT IS MORE OR LESS CORRECT. HOWEVER, NOTE THAT THIS DEFINITION OF MODES IS NOT JUST THE WAY TVS SEES IT. IT IS ALSO THE WAY ESTILLIANS AND CVI SEES IT. ESTILL ARE THE ORIGINATORS OF VOCAL MODES, SO PEOPLE THAT CARE TO BE ACCURATE ABOUT VOCAL MODES, TEND TO FOLLOW THEIR ORIGINAL FOUNDATION ON THE TOPIC, WHICH TVS PHYSICAL MODES DO. I prefer the TVS definition. However, I think that makes the whole bridging late vs bridging early debate between the two systems inconsistent. IS THERE A DEBATE? ... OH YA, KTVA WOULD LIKE CONSUMERS TO BELIEVE THERE IS… THERE IS NO DEBATE. TVS HAS BOTH BOTTOM UP AND TOP DOWN TECHNIQUES. THIS IS A TIRED, OLD IDEA THAT STARTED ABOUT FOUR YEARS AGO THAT HAS BEEN PROPAGATED TO CREATE CONFUSION IN THE MARKET ABOUT WHAT TVS STANDS FOR... KTVA HAS GOT A LOT OF MILEAGE OUT OF PROPAGATING THIS MISINFORMATION. IT IS COMPLETELY STUPID AND I HAVE CREATED NO LESS THEN FOUR VIDEOS TO COMBAT THE CONFUSION. Ken's criticism of what he calls late bridging seems more apt to describing some classical voice teachers who teach bridging to a falsetto mode instead of a twang mode, or metal screamers who rely on a distorted reinforced falsetto. His criticism being that early bridging over time breaks down the "mid voice," of which he doesn't define. HE TALKS A GOOD GAME AND CERTAINLY SINGS A GOOD GAME… BUT WITH ALL DUE RESPECT, IN MY OPINION AND FROM FEEDBACK FROM HIS CUSTOMERS, HE DOESN’T ALWAYS DEFINE OR EXPLAIN A GOOD GAME. IN REGARDS TO EARLY BRIDGING AND VOCAL ATROPHY… ON THIS POINT, I AGREE WITH KEN. THE LACK OF BOTTOM UP TRAINING WILL RESULT IN WEAK TA MUSCLE STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE. BOTTOM TRAINING IS ESSENTIAL TO BELTING, BUT ALSO JUST TO BASIC VOCAL HEALTH. THIS IS WHY THE NEW 4PILLARS SYSTEM HAS AN EXTENSIVE BOTTOM-UP AND BELT TRAINING EXPLANATIONS AND ROUTINES. With the TVS definition, I'd say I mostly bridge early. But it's not such a big difference it seems. I can still bring a bigger boomier sound up higher, but from learning early bridging techniques, I'm not stuck to an overly heavy phonation with constriction. It's dynamic and free. PRECISELY!!!!!!!!!!! YOU NEED BOTH APPROACHES! DIFFERENT PEOPLE NEED DIFFERENT APPROACHES BASED ON THEIR NEEDS. YOU DESCRIBED THOSE NEEDS NICELY. I TOTALLY AGREE. KNOW THIS… THE REASON ANY COACH WOULD BE LIGHT ON TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES IS SIMPLY BECAUSE TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES ARE MORE COMPLICATED TO UNDERSTAND AND TEACH. IT IS A LOT EASIER TO TEACH BOTTOM-UP TECHNIQUES. TOP-DOWN TECHNIQUES REQUIRE MORE PRECISION AND MORE UNDERSTANDING OF THE MUSCULATURE AND OTHER DETAILS. "PUSH FROM THE BOTTOM UP ON AN AH VOWEL"... IS A FAR EASIER STORY TO TELL, THEN BUILDING FROM INSIDE THE HEAD VOICE. I think part of the confusion also stems from the SLS / singing success terms, where the mixed voice is their term for twang, and head voice is defined as a strong falsetto. WHICH IS AN AWFUL DEFINITION OF TWANG… AND PAINFULLY INCORRECT. AGAIN, IF ANY OF THESE PEOPLE, WOULD BOTHER TO STUDY VOCAL MODES AS I HAVE, THEY WOULD NOT BE TALKING INACCURACIES TO CONSUMERS. SLS AND SS SEEM LIKE THE LEAST INFORMED TEACHERS SOMETIMES. TO BE SURE, THEY ARE NOT TRAINED IN VOCAL MODES AND ARE WAY OF COURSE WHEN IT COMES TO BELTING. VERY FEW PEOPLE WILL EVER BUILD A STRONG TOP REGISTER BELT WITH "SING LIKE YOU SPEAK" TYPE METHODS. It's kind of silly considering the actually mixed resonance we feel is only from around c4 to E4. Mixed voice is just a bad term. YEP… THAT IS WHY I KILLED IT IN MY “MIXED VOICE IS DEAD!” VIDEO… IT IS A TERM THAT SOME TEACHERS USE TO KEEP THEIR STUDENTS CONFUSED. THE MORE YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STUDENTS CONFUSED, THE LESS YOU HAVE TO REALLY UNDERSTAND YOUR SUBJECT MATTER AND BE ABLE TO REALLY EXPLAIN THINGS AS A TEACHER. Am I understanding this right? TOM, I THINK YOU HAVE A LOT OF THIS PRETTY SQUARED AWAY. IT SEEMS THE TVS CONTENT IS HELPING YOU TO SORT THIS ALL OUT, WHICH IS GREAT. Tom View full articles
  10. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>>
  11. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>> View full articles
  12. Hi, TMV-ers! I thought it would be useful today to write a bit about how I approach and talk about vocal technique, in the hope that by putting these ideas out there, you can pick and choose some of them that make sense to you, and that you will hopefully find useful. As a starting point for this, I am inspired to recall an idea I read in Cornelius Reid's book, 'Voice - Psyche and Soma'. I cannot remember the exact quote, but the gist of it is that the mind and the body are acting together to produce the singing voice. I think this means for vocal technique that singing is simultaneously psychological and physical. A survey of books written on singing over the last 200 years shows that every teacher has a different approach to working with singers, a different mix of the psychological and physical. Some favor emphasis of the physical aspects, and talk about doing things with body parts, muscle groups, tendons, nasal cavities, lower jaw, the tongue, etc. Others emphasize the sensations of the singer, i.e., 'sing so that you feel such and such a sensation in such and such location in your body'. Still others rely on metaphors and imagery, i.e., 'sing out the top of your head', or 'imagine that you are projecting the tone toward a target on the wall', or 'think of a happy memory'. I don't do any of these alone. Perhaps better stated, I do them all, cherry-picking ideas and approaches from these authors that have these characteristics: 1) are based on anatomical fact, acoustical principles, and physiologically healthy bodily action. 2) are easily expressed and understood using in common language 3) can be practiced beneficially by the student without the teacher's constant supervision 4) help the singer build their ability to sing what they desire to sing - whatever genre or style that is. When it comes to teaching, I am also an optimist. :-) I believe that most people, with very few exceptions, can learn to sing for their own & others' enjoyment if they approach it with patience. In my next posts, I will be writing about the basics of how the voice works - 'what happens where' in the mind and body to produce healthy vocal tone. Along the way, I will address some common misconceptions I've encountered, and clarify some terms that are often used by singers and teachers, but not well understood. I have no illusions that the way I approach this is the only way, or even the best way. I am very interested to hear other ways of doing it as well, as that is how I learn myself. If you have a particular area you'd like to discuss, send me an e-mail or comment to my blog, and I will pull that text forward in a response. Best Regards, Steve
  13. Hi, TMV-ers! I thought it would be useful today to write a bit about how I approach and talk about vocal technique, in the hope that by putting these ideas out there, you can pick and choose some of them that make sense to you, and that you will hopefully find useful. As a starting point for this, I am inspired to recall an idea I read in Cornelius Reid's book, 'Voice - Psyche and Soma'. I cannot remember the exact quote, but the gist of it is that the mind and the body are acting together to produce the singing voice. I think this means for vocal technique that singing is simultaneously psychological and physical. A survey of books written on singing over the last 200 years shows that every teacher has a different approach to working with singers, a different mix of the psychological and physical. Some favor emphasis of the physical aspects, and talk about doing things with body parts, muscle groups, tendons, nasal cavities, lower jaw, the tongue, etc. Others emphasize the sensations of the singer, i.e., 'sing so that you feel such and such a sensation in such and such location in your body'. Still others rely on metaphors and imagery, i.e., 'sing out the top of your head', or 'imagine that you are projecting the tone toward a target on the wall', or 'think of a happy memory'. I don't do any of these alone. Perhaps better stated, I do them all, cherry-picking ideas and approaches from these authors that have these characteristics: 1) are based on anatomical fact, acoustical principles, and physiologically healthy bodily action. 2) are easily expressed and understood using in common language 3) can be practiced beneficially by the student without the teacher's constant supervision 4) help the singer build their ability to sing what they desire to sing - whatever genre or style that is. When it comes to teaching, I am also an optimist. :-) I believe that most people, with very few exceptions, can learn to sing for their own & others' enjoyment if they approach it with patience. In my next posts, I will be writing about the basics of how the voice works - 'what happens where' in the mind and body to produce healthy vocal tone. Along the way, I will address some common misconceptions I've encountered, and clarify some terms that are often used by singers and teachers, but not well understood. I have no illusions that the way I approach this is the only way, or even the best way. I am very interested to hear other ways of doing it as well, as that is how I learn myself. If you have a particular area you'd like to discuss, send me an e-mail or comment to my blog, and I will pull that text forward in a response. Best Regards, Steve View full articles
  14. One must remember singing is as much about your habits between vocalizing as during. I've seen many so called pro who do nothing all week and then want to know why it doesn't work right on friday night when they hit the stage. 1. You should stretch your tongue several times a day, your throat as well 2. You should re-place and re-focus your voice and placement continuosly throughout the day 3. You should speak in different registers ,tonalities and placements throughout the day to maintain agility 4. you should breath fully and deeply (retain control of your breathing) at all times These things will also help your speaking voice and prevent muscles from constricting between vocalizing.
  15. One must remember singing is as much about your habits between vocalizing as during. I've seen many so called pro who do nothing all week and then want to know why it doesn't work right on friday night when they hit the stage. 1. You should stretch your tongue several times a day, your throat as well 2. You should re-place and re-focus your voice and placement continuosly throughout the day 3. You should speak in different registers ,tonalities and placements throughout the day to maintain agility 4. you should breath fully and deeply (retain control of your breathing) at all times These things will also help your speaking voice and prevent muscles from constricting between vocalizing. View full articles
  16. Modern Voice Teaching, It's discrepancies, and the Effect on the Starting Vocalist I'd like to talk to you all a minute about the effect of the discrepancies in vocal theoretics on the starting vocalist. I'm noticing that most people crave to find a way to set them apart from another voice teacher and promote why their way is better, because they want to have more students. However, it's often very confusing for the starting student. In my vocal journey to understand the depts of vocal technique, I have many times struggled with trying to reconcile the different viewpoints on what makes the good vocal technique. However the further I get into it, the more I see that most people are actually telling and believing the same with a different layer. There is one big problem I see with a lot of vocal teaching these days, though, is that teachers often teach what they are being thought and what worked for them. As a teacher, I think it's important that they realise that every individual is different, a therefore, studie a pleora of training methods so they kind of can listen to the student and test them if a certain approach or exercise works for them. When I started, many times an exercise didn't work for me at the time, and often some people would keep me doing it, and it would depress me. Also there lies a problem with many teachers failing to properly explain why an exercise is used. They will tell you please do this scale with this sound, and then tell you maybe what to change, without even properly explaining why you are doing the exercise. This is a problem since it creates a dependency on the teacher to tell you what is right or wrong. If you understand all the theoretics behind an exercise you can listen to yourself and notice if you're doing the exercise the way the exercise is supposed to be done, if you don't know it, the starting student might be clueless why the exercise didn't work. The second problem I would like to tackle with modern voice teaching and it's sort of new found way to promote "Secrets". They would go: If you buy my program, you're gonna get an instant result or We'll tell you the SECRET of the mix like you can just read a spell on a student and he'll be doing it. Or, they would go on and tell why method A, B, C are bad, and why theirs will help you get a wonderful voice in no time, or would add X notes to your repertoire in the blink of an eye. I'm telling this because in talking to my students, or in helping people in the forums, I have noticed many people just asking, Elrathion, what is a mix? Do I have it? When will I get it? Or even better: "Oh Boy, when I get a mix, I'll be like a superstar". or, "I think my training is nearly done, just need to "find" my mix voice, and then I'll be able to sing any song I want in any key". Giving this kind of promises to people I think creates an unfair illusion to people. How about we just step to the starting vocalists and tell them the truth. We got an approach, that has proven to work, and you're voice will improve immensely, but it'll take your dedicated work. Practising with attention for detail, week in week out, and in a period of one or two years you'll have improved immensely. Because most starters easily get depressed, after 2-3 months they think oh boy I'm still very bad and I thought my voice was gonna change massively, and then they think they just must suck, it's not the program, it's them. Your opinions, please!
  17. Modern Voice Teaching, It's discrepancies, and the Effect on the Starting Vocalist I'd like to talk to you all a minute about the effect of the discrepancies in vocal theoretics on the starting vocalist. I'm noticing that most people crave to find a way to set them apart from another voice teacher and promote why their way is better, because they want to have more students. However, it's often very confusing for the starting student. In my vocal journey to understand the depts of vocal technique, I have many times struggled with trying to reconcile the different viewpoints on what makes the good vocal technique. However the further I get into it, the more I see that most people are actually telling and believing the same with a different layer. There is one big problem I see with a lot of vocal teaching these days, though, is that teachers often teach what they are being thought and what worked for them. As a teacher, I think it's important that they realise that every individual is different, a therefore, studie a pleora of training methods so they kind of can listen to the student and test them if a certain approach or exercise works for them. When I started, many times an exercise didn't work for me at the time, and often some people would keep me doing it, and it would depress me. Also there lies a problem with many teachers failing to properly explain why an exercise is used. They will tell you please do this scale with this sound, and then tell you maybe what to change, without even properly explaining why you are doing the exercise. This is a problem since it creates a dependency on the teacher to tell you what is right or wrong. If you understand all the theoretics behind an exercise you can listen to yourself and notice if you're doing the exercise the way the exercise is supposed to be done, if you don't know it, the starting student might be clueless why the exercise didn't work. The second problem I would like to tackle with modern voice teaching and it's sort of new found way to promote "Secrets". They would go: If you buy my program, you're gonna get an instant result or We'll tell you the SECRET of the mix like you can just read a spell on a student and he'll be doing it. Or, they would go on and tell why method A, B, C are bad, and why theirs will help you get a wonderful voice in no time, or would add X notes to your repertoire in the blink of an eye. I'm telling this because in talking to my students, or in helping people in the forums, I have noticed many people just asking, Elrathion, what is a mix? Do I have it? When will I get it? Or even better: "Oh Boy, when I get a mix, I'll be like a superstar". or, "I think my training is nearly done, just need to "find" my mix voice, and then I'll be able to sing any song I want in any key". Giving this kind of promises to people I think creates an unfair illusion to people. How about we just step to the starting vocalists and tell them the truth. We got an approach, that has proven to work, and you're voice will improve immensely, but it'll take your dedicated work. Practising with attention for detail, week in week out, and in a period of one or two years you'll have improved immensely. Because most starters easily get depressed, after 2-3 months they think oh boy I'm still very bad and I thought my voice was gonna change massively, and then they think they just must suck, it's not the program, it's them. Your opinions, please! View full articles
  18. So what does a student need? They need to be able to do all of the physical tasks that constitute the singing activity required by their goals. This requires training, even if no trainer is available. In addition, their goals will require them to develop the musicianship and experience to handle styles, inflection, and ornamentation appropriate for the music they want to do. This requires learning, even if no teacher is available. In school and at home, we were told many times to "Think about what you are doing!" That approach is almost completely counter-productive for musicians and high wire walkers. Imagine the effect of yelling "Think about what you're doing!" to a person walking a wire across the Grand Canyon. The free-flow execution of skills is managed by a part of the brain that is totally different from the part of the brain where knowledge and understanding are applied to currently executing skills. Once a performer starts thinking about what they are doing, the analytical part of the brain begins to interfere with the free-flow part of the brain. If you as a teacher explain everything, you are implying that singing skills can be managed by the intellect, which is actually impossible beyond a beginner level. I'm not saying that teaching about the subject of singing technique has no value. A voice teacher needs to really know and understand the subject. However, I am suggesting that you carefully consider how much and when to teach a student "about" singing technique. My friend, Robert Lunte, says that singers need to train as "vocal athletes," and I totally agree. The great athletes don't become great by approaching their skills analytically. Their trainers focus on the physical and mental demands of specific skills, and they train the muscles to do the job. The great trainers also train the athlete's mind to concentrate in ways that don't interfere with the fluency of their physical skills. Princeton says that "training refers to the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and competencies as a result of the teaching of vocational or practical skills and knowledge that relate to specific useful competencies." I like that definition, but I would boil it down a bit and say that personal voice training is leading someone through exercises and experiences that develop the skills to achieve specific goals and acquire the knowledge required to execute those skills in the required styles. For more information about The Performing Mind, go to http://www.pfco.com. Michael Kysar The Performing Mind http://www.pfco.com
  19. So what does a student need? They need to be able to do all of the physical tasks that constitute the singing activity required by their goals. This requires training, even if no trainer is available. In addition, their goals will require them to develop the musicianship and experience to handle styles, inflection, and ornamentation appropriate for the music they want to do. This requires learning, even if no teacher is available. In school and at home, we were told many times to "Think about what you are doing!" That approach is almost completely counter-productive for musicians and high wire walkers. Imagine the effect of yelling "Think about what you're doing!" to a person walking a wire across the Grand Canyon. The free-flow execution of skills is managed by a part of the brain that is totally different from the part of the brain where knowledge and understanding are applied to currently executing skills. Once a performer starts thinking about what they are doing, the analytical part of the brain begins to interfere with the free-flow part of the brain. If you as a teacher explain everything, you are implying that singing skills can be managed by the intellect, which is actually impossible beyond a beginner level. I'm not saying that teaching about the subject of singing technique has no value. A voice teacher needs to really know and understand the subject. However, I am suggesting that you carefully consider how much and when to teach a student "about" singing technique. My friend, Robert Lunte, says that singers need to train as "vocal athletes," and I totally agree. The great athletes don't become great by approaching their skills analytically. Their trainers focus on the physical and mental demands of specific skills, and they train the muscles to do the job. The great trainers also train the athlete's mind to concentrate in ways that don't interfere with the fluency of their physical skills. Princeton says that "training refers to the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and competencies as a result of the teaching of vocational or practical skills and knowledge that relate to specific useful competencies." I like that definition, but I would boil it down a bit and say that personal voice training is leading someone through exercises and experiences that develop the skills to achieve specific goals and acquire the knowledge required to execute those skills in the required styles. For more information about The Performing Mind, go to http://www.pfco.com. Michael Kysar The Performing Mind http://www.pfco.com View full articles
  20. It's been my own experience as well as the experience of my clients that "thinking" while singing cannot be a part of this process. If you are thinking about technique while you sing, you will lose the emotional content of which you wish to express as well as the artistry. I had to learn for myself ,and then teach my students, that vocal exercising was just that: exercising the instrument. I use vocal exercising to warm up the voice, see where a voice is at, fix any difficulties a singer might be having, rehabilitate (a specialty of mine) from damage or injury, and train for proper support and breathing. If you think about the things I've just mentioned about the use of vocal exercising, could you ever really do all of that while performing your songs? Would it truly be possible to carry your message with all that mind tripping going on? The only message ever conveyed from all that is "Pretty voice, but oh so academic in sound." What a horrible feeling. You shouldn't have to worry about your voice when you sing and perform. Everything should be such second nature to you that you are free to express yourself. The ONLY time to think about your voice is when practicing your exercises to get rid of bad habits that have either damaged your voice or are keeping you from having the voice you want. It's also my experience that although it's important to gain a good intellectual understanding of what needs to happen, intellect alone will not change anything. It is with the repetitive PHYSICAL experience that you gain true knowledge ( the dictionary definition of knowledge is 'understanding gained AFTER you have experienced it'). The repeated action of vocal exercising that takes place when getting rid of bad habits is what the experience of exercising is about. Also, using any exercise of choice to warm-up the voice will help you discover any weak points you might have on any given day. Once uncovered, you can choose an exercise that might help to open up that.particular section. That's when you really know you've gained true control. Thinking should actually take place BEFORE practicing a vocal exercise run. Learning what you are doing wrong before you can learn how to do it right is the first part of the process. It is with the correct intellectual information that you contemplate, not concentrate, what you've been told must happen to undo any bad habit. When you begin a run, you SHOULD NOT be thinking about it. Rather, you remind yourself just BEFORE you do it and then just GO! NO thinking! Tape, listen for steady streams of sound, and feeling when it's uncontrollable. If you can't figure out what you did that made you feel uncomfortable, listen back to the tape and make fun of the sound by imitating it. This is a proven way to figure it out .
  21. It's been my own experience as well as the experience of my clients that "thinking" while singing cannot be a part of this process. If you are thinking about technique while you sing, you will lose the emotional content of which you wish to express as well as the artistry. I had to learn for myself ,and then teach my students, that vocal exercising was just that: exercising the instrument. I use vocal exercising to warm up the voice, see where a voice is at, fix any difficulties a singer might be having, rehabilitate (a specialty of mine) from damage or injury, and train for proper support and breathing. If you think about the things I've just mentioned about the use of vocal exercising, could you ever really do all of that while performing your songs? Would it truly be possible to carry your message with all that mind tripping going on? The only message ever conveyed from all that is "Pretty voice, but oh so academic in sound." What a horrible feeling. You shouldn't have to worry about your voice when you sing and perform. Everything should be such second nature to you that you are free to express yourself. The ONLY time to think about your voice is when practicing your exercises to get rid of bad habits that have either damaged your voice or are keeping you from having the voice you want. It's also my experience that although it's important to gain a good intellectual understanding of what needs to happen, intellect alone will not change anything. It is with the repetitive PHYSICAL experience that you gain true knowledge ( the dictionary definition of knowledge is 'understanding gained AFTER you have experienced it'). The repeated action of vocal exercising that takes place when getting rid of bad habits is what the experience of exercising is about. Also, using any exercise of choice to warm-up the voice will help you discover any weak points you might have on any given day. Once uncovered, you can choose an exercise that might help to open up that.particular section. That's when you really know you've gained true control. Thinking should actually take place BEFORE practicing a vocal exercise run. Learning what you are doing wrong before you can learn how to do it right is the first part of the process. It is with the correct intellectual information that you contemplate, not concentrate, what you've been told must happen to undo any bad habit. When you begin a run, you SHOULD NOT be thinking about it. Rather, you remind yourself just BEFORE you do it and then just GO! NO thinking! Tape, listen for steady streams of sound, and feeling when it's uncontrollable. If you can't figure out what you did that made you feel uncomfortable, listen back to the tape and make fun of the sound by imitating it. This is a proven way to figure it out . View full articles
  22. Introduction In the Opera world, one of the most exciting things to anticipate and hear is the brilliant, climactic high note of the tenor soloist in an aria. Not only does the voice carry well without amplification, but takes on a distinctly thrilling, impressive quality of resonance that other parts of the voice do not quite have in the same way. In this post, I will explore the ways that these fine singers manage their voices to enable such singing. Since we will be objectively discussing vocal tone quality, I will be using spectragraphs to assist. With some of these particular ones, I will include annotations to the images so that the reader can make the connection between the visual representation and aural experience of harmonics within the vocal tone quality. The spectragraphs I use will all be of the final note in the Tenor Aria, 'Celeste Aida', from Verdi's Opera Aida, which is on the syllable 'Sol' on the Bb above middle C. To give credit where credit is due, my investigation in this area was inspired by the published work of Donald Miller at www.vocevista.com. The spectragraphs were produced with Spectragram16, by Richard Horne. Bjoerling and Domingo The spectragraph to the left shows that note from recordings of two of the most popular and capable operatic tenors of the 20th Century, Jussi Bjoerling (represented with the blue line) and Placido Domingo,(represented with the white line.) To help orient you to the image, I have annotated it with lines and text to show the locations of the harmonics of the sung tones. On this diagram, left=lower frequency, right=higher frequency. Up=higher intensity, down=lower intensity. The frequency range represented is 0 to 4000 cycles per second (Hz). So that these notes could be compared as well as can be from recordings, I equalized the volume of the fundamentals. What we can see and conclude With this equalization, the fundamentals and 2nd harmonics (H2) are about the same strength when comparing voice-to-voice, as evidenced by the nearly exact overlay of the blue and white lines. However, a very great difference is noticable in the intensity of H3. Bjoerling's H3 goes way higher on the intensity scale than Domingo's, indicating that it is very much stronger. H4 and H5 are also more intense than those of Domingo, though their intensity in Domingo's voice increases until they are in rough parity with that of Bjoerling at H6. From there, the intensity of harmonics falls off dramatically in both voices. So, as a proportion of the overall sound of the recorded voice, Jussi Bjoerling's tone quality and power are created mostly by H3, H6, H5 and H2 (in decreasing order by intensity) while Domingo's tone quality and power are created mostly via harmonics H6, H2, H1 and H5, again, in decreasing order by intensity. These different balances, while they both sound like tenors, make them distinguishable to our ears. What we cannot conclude Does this mean that Bjoerling's voice was 'bigger' or 'more resonant' than Domingo's, or perhaps the other way around? Neither one!. Engineers who make recordings adjust volumes and balances at their own discretion, to make recordings have a satisfying overall effect for the listener, while not overwhelming the recording or playback machines. There is simply no way to tell from a recording what the original sound intensities were, only how they were after they were recorded and mixed down. Sometimes (though not much with Opera) some EQ is added to overcome a recording problem, or to 'sweeten' the effect a bit. Some of that latter can be seen in some of the images here, and is discussed below under the section 'Engineering Artifacts'. So, even though we cannot learn the size of these voices in absolute terms, we can learn (in general) how the sound energy of the harmonics is distributed relative to one another within a single recorded voice, and can compare recording to recording. Vocal Resonance Strategies Vocal power that is distributed across the various harmonics is perceived by the listener differently, according to the frequency range of the particular harmonics. In the case of the Bjoerling and Domingo notes, the reason that there is such a dispartity in the displays of the blue and white lines is that these singers have balanced their resonances differently for this note in the recordings selected. Surveying recordings of more than fourty of the top tenors of the 20th Century, these voices predominately use one or both of two strategies to create the powerful top voice. In this next section, we will explore the strategies that they used, and comment on the overall effect. The 'Singers Formant' region Looking back at the picture for a moment, you may notice the two vertical red lines which bracket the frequency range of the 6th Harmonic, very strong in both voices. These lines show the 'center 400Hz ' of the Singers formant region, and also indicate the area of highest hearing sensitivity. When harmonics are strong in this frequency region, they are very audible, adding to the carrying power of the voice, and to the listener's perception of voice quality as well. For the singer without amplification, presence of these frequencies allows the voice to cut through above the sound of a piano easily, and even a full orchestra in the concert or Operatic venues. These frequencies also help the audience member locate the sound source very specifically on stage, a big help when singing an ensemble :-) Both Domingo and Bjoerling have this important feature in their voices. Incidentally, the frequency of the 6th harmonic is 2 octaves and a major third above the sung fundamental. The first most common strategy for vocal power and audibility is to have a strong singer's formant, as strong or stronger than the fundamental and 2nd harmonic. We could also call this the 'high ring' strategy. Lowest 3 Harmonics The perception of the 'darkness' or 'warmth' of the voice comes from the intensities of the lowest 2 harmonics, H1 and H2, which are the fundamental of the sung tone, and the octave above it. For these, both singers have about the same proportion, and this forms a solid core to the sound in both voices. To the listener, these two harmonics are very difficult to distinguish individually when they are approximately the same volume. The presence of the proportionally louder H3 in Bjoerling's voice introduces an interesting difference. H3 is the frequency an octave and a perfect 5th above the fundamental, what (to a classical organist) would be called a 'quint'. This quite strong harmonic colors the tone distinctively, and, because it is an odd-numbered harmonic, it stands out in the awareness of the listener, adding brilliance to the vowel. When the 3rd harmonic is the loudest in the whole voice (such as it is for Bjoerling) this becomes a significant feature of the tone quality, and carries a great deal of the vocal power. The second most common strategy for vocal power (and coloring) is to have a strong 3rd Harmonic. The strong H3 is obtained by singing a vowel which tunes the 2nd formant (F2) to just a little bit higher than H3, a process sometimes called vowel modification, or vocal tract tuning. We could also call this the mid+high ring strategy. (Note: For other combinations of note and vowel impression, the tuning of F2 is more advantageously made to H4.) In professional voices, both of these individual strategies can be found, and also combined. Jussi Bjoerling is a fine example of the combined, and Placido Domingo is an excellent example of the "singer's formant" or low+high ring strategy. Another Singer for Comparison - Franco Corelli Franco Corelli (one of Dennison's faves) is known for an heroic tenor voice. This spectragram shows the relative strength of the harmonics in his voice for the same note we were examining with Domingo and Bjoerling. Though there is a bit more orchestral clutter in the sample (sharp spikes here and there, and on the left end,) you can see clearly that the 3rd harmonic is very prominent in his voice, . Looking to the right, you see some strength with H4, H5 and H6, and then a strong H7 as well. This would make his approach a 'combined' one. Others for comparison. See if you can identify which strategies they employ Alfredo Kraus Benjamino Gigli Luciano Pavarotti Special note here: Pavarotti's voice is very interesting in that he uses the H3 formant tuning, but does not combine it with a strong singer's formant. The overall effect is very distinctive. Enrico Caruso Mario Lanza Engineering Artifacts - possible The clustering of the formants F3, F3 and F5 which combine in the Singer's formant region ordinarily produce somewhat jagged peaks in a spectragraphic display. When recorded and displayed 'as is', without any 'sweetening' EQ, they do not often take the shape of smooth curves, rounded on top, but will ramp up and down fairly sharply across 3 or 4 harmonics. Go back to the Kraus spectragraph, and look at the shape of the curve created by the tops of H4, H5, H6, H7 and H8. Disregard the leading (rightmost edge) pointy peaks that show up, that is an orchestral note. The 'wide' part is from the voice. IMO, the slow ramp-up of the harmonic intensities in this region, peaking at H7, and then diminishing a bit to H8, just looks too regular. I think this is a likely example of some EQ shaping to allow the voice to cut through the orchestral mix. Though I cannot be quite so sure on this one, the suddenly very strong H7 in the Correlli spectragraph looks a bit out of place, with the intensities of the immediately 3 lower harmonics at the levels they are. Now you know what you might look for, I will leave the judgment to you. Its not likely, while listening to the recording, that you would be aware of any of these harmonics individually, anyway. None of these latter points reflects on the quality of the singer in any way, nor would the singer likely have been aware that tweaks were done on their behalf. As I said earlier, the Engineers work to create an effective recording of the voice that fairly represents what the performance sounded like to them. Summary We've seen with these examples the most often occuring resonance strategies for creating the ringing top notes of the Operatic Tenor voice, and readily-accessible examples from some of the most popular singers of the 20th Century. We've also discussed the limitations of using recordings to make these conclusions. If you'd like to see more articles of this type, studying the vocalism of other voices, please send me a comment as to your interests. In any case, I plan to do a parallel discussion of the resonance strategies of the Operatic Baritone (Warren, Milnes, Tibett and Bastianini!), the female high voice, and discuss in detail the challenges involved with the transition from mid voice to the top in both types. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - A Christmas Egg The following spectragram is of Michael Bolton (in blue) and Luciano Pavarotti (in white) singing the climactic note of Puccini's Aria 'Nessun Dorma' from Turandot. These were public, large-hall performances, and the performers were close-miked, a very interesting way to hear Pavarotti's voice :-) The note being sung is the B natural above middle C. A problem I encountered in comparing the voices with these recordings is that orchestra is playing quite loudly, so the first harmonics are cluttered by those sounds, so much so that we cannot really distinguish what component of the sound is the singer, and what is the orchestra. To do this particular equalization, I matched volume of harmonics H2 (right above the '1' on the bottom scale) and H3 (midway between '1' and '2'), since the vocal vibrato in both voices makes the trace wide enough to see. Interesting, that Michael Bolton and Luciano Pavarotti have almost exactly the same resonance balance ratio for these two harmonics. Remember, this sort of comparison does not tell us about the absolute volume of the voices, just how the resonances are balanced. You can see some places in the higher harmonics where Bolton's voice has relative strength, too. He has characteristic singer's formant strength that peaks at H6, (right in the sweet spot of our hearing) which would make his resonance strategy for the note a 'combined' one, from our former terminology. If you are interested to listen to these performances: Luciano Pavarotti at
  23. Introduction In the Opera world, one of the most exciting things to anticipate and hear is the brilliant, climactic high note of the tenor soloist in an aria. Not only does the voice carry well without amplification, but takes on a distinctly thrilling, impressive quality of resonance that other parts of the voice do not quite have in the same way. In this post, I will explore the ways that these fine singers manage their voices to enable such singing. Since we will be objectively discussing vocal tone quality, I will be using spectragraphs to assist. With some of these particular ones, I will include annotations to the images so that the reader can make the connection between the visual representation and aural experience of harmonics within the vocal tone quality. The spectragraphs I use will all be of the final note in the Tenor Aria, 'Celeste Aida', from Verdi's Opera Aida, which is on the syllable 'Sol' on the Bb above middle C. To give credit where credit is due, my investigation in this area was inspired by the published work of Donald Miller at www.vocevista.com. The spectragraphs were produced with Spectragram16, by Richard Horne. Bjoerling and Domingo The spectragraph to the left shows that note from recordings of two of the most popular and capable operatic tenors of the 20th Century, Jussi Bjoerling (represented with the blue line) and Placido Domingo,(represented with the white line.) To help orient you to the image, I have annotated it with lines and text to show the locations of the harmonics of the sung tones. On this diagram, left=lower frequency, right=higher frequency. Up=higher intensity, down=lower intensity. The frequency range represented is 0 to 4000 cycles per second (Hz). So that these notes could be compared as well as can be from recordings, I equalized the volume of the fundamentals. What we can see and conclude With this equalization, the fundamentals and 2nd harmonics (H2) are about the same strength when comparing voice-to-voice, as evidenced by the nearly exact overlay of the blue and white lines. However, a very great difference is noticable in the intensity of H3. Bjoerling's H3 goes way higher on the intensity scale than Domingo's, indicating that it is very much stronger. H4 and H5 are also more intense than those of Domingo, though their intensity in Domingo's voice increases until they are in rough parity with that of Bjoerling at H6. From there, the intensity of harmonics falls off dramatically in both voices. So, as a proportion of the overall sound of the recorded voice, Jussi Bjoerling's tone quality and power are created mostly by H3, H6, H5 and H2 (in decreasing order by intensity) while Domingo's tone quality and power are created mostly via harmonics H6, H2, H1 and H5, again, in decreasing order by intensity. These different balances, while they both sound like tenors, make them distinguishable to our ears. What we cannot conclude Does this mean that Bjoerling's voice was 'bigger' or 'more resonant' than Domingo's, or perhaps the other way around? Neither one!. Engineers who make recordings adjust volumes and balances at their own discretion, to make recordings have a satisfying overall effect for the listener, while not overwhelming the recording or playback machines. There is simply no way to tell from a recording what the original sound intensities were, only how they were after they were recorded and mixed down. Sometimes (though not much with Opera) some EQ is added to overcome a recording problem, or to 'sweeten' the effect a bit. Some of that latter can be seen in some of the images here, and is discussed below under the section 'Engineering Artifacts'. So, even though we cannot learn the size of these voices in absolute terms, we can learn (in general) how the sound energy of the harmonics is distributed relative to one another within a single recorded voice, and can compare recording to recording. Vocal Resonance Strategies Vocal power that is distributed across the various harmonics is perceived by the listener differently, according to the frequency range of the particular harmonics. In the case of the Bjoerling and Domingo notes, the reason that there is such a dispartity in the displays of the blue and white lines is that these singers have balanced their resonances differently for this note in the recordings selected. Surveying recordings of more than fourty of the top tenors of the 20th Century, these voices predominately use one or both of two strategies to create the powerful top voice. In this next section, we will explore the strategies that they used, and comment on the overall effect. The 'Singers Formant' region Looking back at the picture for a moment, you may notice the two vertical red lines which bracket the frequency range of the 6th Harmonic, very strong in both voices. These lines show the 'center 400Hz ' of the Singers formant region, and also indicate the area of highest hearing sensitivity. When harmonics are strong in this frequency region, they are very audible, adding to the carrying power of the voice, and to the listener's perception of voice quality as well. For the singer without amplification, presence of these frequencies allows the voice to cut through above the sound of a piano easily, and even a full orchestra in the concert or Operatic venues. These frequencies also help the audience member locate the sound source very specifically on stage, a big help when singing an ensemble :-) Both Domingo and Bjoerling have this important feature in their voices. Incidentally, the frequency of the 6th harmonic is 2 octaves and a major third above the sung fundamental. The first most common strategy for vocal power and audibility is to have a strong singer's formant, as strong or stronger than the fundamental and 2nd harmonic. We could also call this the 'high ring' strategy. Lowest 3 Harmonics The perception of the 'darkness' or 'warmth' of the voice comes from the intensities of the lowest 2 harmonics, H1 and H2, which are the fundamental of the sung tone, and the octave above it. For these, both singers have about the same proportion, and this forms a solid core to the sound in both voices. To the listener, these two harmonics are very difficult to distinguish individually when they are approximately the same volume. The presence of the proportionally louder H3 in Bjoerling's voice introduces an interesting difference. H3 is the frequency an octave and a perfect 5th above the fundamental, what (to a classical organist) would be called a 'quint'. This quite strong harmonic colors the tone distinctively, and, because it is an odd-numbered harmonic, it stands out in the awareness of the listener, adding brilliance to the vowel. When the 3rd harmonic is the loudest in the whole voice (such as it is for Bjoerling) this becomes a significant feature of the tone quality, and carries a great deal of the vocal power. The second most common strategy for vocal power (and coloring) is to have a strong 3rd Harmonic. The strong H3 is obtained by singing a vowel which tunes the 2nd formant (F2) to just a little bit higher than H3, a process sometimes called vowel modification, or vocal tract tuning. We could also call this the mid+high ring strategy. (Note: For other combinations of note and vowel impression, the tuning of F2 is more advantageously made to H4.) In professional voices, both of these individual strategies can be found, and also combined. Jussi Bjoerling is a fine example of the combined, and Placido Domingo is an excellent example of the "singer's formant" or low+high ring strategy. Another Singer for Comparison - Franco Corelli Franco Corelli (one of Dennison's faves) is known for an heroic tenor voice. This spectragram shows the relative strength of the harmonics in his voice for the same note we were examining with Domingo and Bjoerling. Though there is a bit more orchestral clutter in the sample (sharp spikes here and there, and on the left end,) you can see clearly that the 3rd harmonic is very prominent in his voice, . Looking to the right, you see some strength with H4, H5 and H6, and then a strong H7 as well. This would make his approach a 'combined' one. Others for comparison. See if you can identify which strategies they employ Alfredo Kraus Benjamino Gigli Luciano Pavarotti Special note here: Pavarotti's voice is very interesting in that he uses the H3 formant tuning, but does not combine it with a strong singer's formant. The overall effect is very distinctive. Enrico Caruso Mario Lanza Engineering Artifacts - possible The clustering of the formants F3, F3 and F5 which combine in the Singer's formant region ordinarily produce somewhat jagged peaks in a spectragraphic display. When recorded and displayed 'as is', without any 'sweetening' EQ, they do not often take the shape of smooth curves, rounded on top, but will ramp up and down fairly sharply across 3 or 4 harmonics. Go back to the Kraus spectragraph, and look at the shape of the curve created by the tops of H4, H5, H6, H7 and H8. Disregard the leading (rightmost edge) pointy peaks that show up, that is an orchestral note. The 'wide' part is from the voice. IMO, the slow ramp-up of the harmonic intensities in this region, peaking at H7, and then diminishing a bit to H8, just looks too regular. I think this is a likely example of some EQ shaping to allow the voice to cut through the orchestral mix. Though I cannot be quite so sure on this one, the suddenly very strong H7 in the Correlli spectragraph looks a bit out of place, with the intensities of the immediately 3 lower harmonics at the levels they are. Now you know what you might look for, I will leave the judgment to you. Its not likely, while listening to the recording, that you would be aware of any of these harmonics individually, anyway. None of these latter points reflects on the quality of the singer in any way, nor would the singer likely have been aware that tweaks were done on their behalf. As I said earlier, the Engineers work to create an effective recording of the voice that fairly represents what the performance sounded like to them. Summary We've seen with these examples the most often occuring resonance strategies for creating the ringing top notes of the Operatic Tenor voice, and readily-accessible examples from some of the most popular singers of the 20th Century. We've also discussed the limitations of using recordings to make these conclusions. If you'd like to see more articles of this type, studying the vocalism of other voices, please send me a comment as to your interests. In any case, I plan to do a parallel discussion of the resonance strategies of the Operatic Baritone (Warren, Milnes, Tibett and Bastianini!), the female high voice, and discuss in detail the challenges involved with the transition from mid voice to the top in both types. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - A Christmas Egg The following spectragram is of Michael Bolton (in blue) and Luciano Pavarotti (in white) singing the climactic note of Puccini's Aria 'Nessun Dorma' from Turandot. These were public, large-hall performances, and the performers were close-miked, a very interesting way to hear Pavarotti's voice :-) The note being sung is the B natural above middle C. A problem I encountered in comparing the voices with these recordings is that orchestra is playing quite loudly, so the first harmonics are cluttered by those sounds, so much so that we cannot really distinguish what component of the sound is the singer, and what is the orchestra. To do this particular equalization, I matched volume of harmonics H2 (right above the '1' on the bottom scale) and H3 (midway between '1' and '2'), since the vocal vibrato in both voices makes the trace wide enough to see. Interesting, that Michael Bolton and Luciano Pavarotti have almost exactly the same resonance balance ratio for these two harmonics. Remember, this sort of comparison does not tell us about the absolute volume of the voices, just how the resonances are balanced. You can see some places in the higher harmonics where Bolton's voice has relative strength, too. He has characteristic singer's formant strength that peaks at H6, (right in the sweet spot of our hearing) which would make his resonance strategy for the note a 'combined' one, from our former terminology. If you are interested to listen to these performances: Luciano Pavarotti at View full articles
  24. Opera singers, classical singers, actors, cantors, preachers and even nowadays rock stars and rappers could gain a great deal from learning one of the most elaborate and sophisticated singing techniques that was invented more than 200 years ago by the Scuola Italiana del Belcanto (translated freely into: The Italian school of beautiful singing). This ancient school of thought has produced some of the most fundamental Opera music and singing techniques that are on a daily basis use by most Opera houses in the world. But , you don't have to be an Opera singer to take advantage of the great benefits the Appoggio technique has to offer a professional vocal user You can learn to master it with an extremely good voice coach or as a part of professional voice therapy design with a voice specialist like me. Appoggio is coming from the Italian word Appogiare which means to lean on What do we lean on when we sing? On air ! Our breath support which is crucial to voice and speech production. Breath support means exactly that, the support our breath is getting before and while we produce sounds of speech or singing using the air that is coming up from our lungs moving our closed vocal cords approximately 100 times per second (Hz) for men, 200 times per second (Hz) for women and up till 400 times per second (Hz) for a child. Many singers and actors (especially beginners or natural ones- that do not attend comprehensive voice coaching as part of their training) are referred to my voice clinic by ENT surgeons after suffering from vocal nodules, vocal cords hypertrophy, detuning and other vocal abuse symptoms mainly because they do not use the correct breath support while stretching their voices to the limit. Simply put, the air support or the breath support for professional voice users like Opera singers, classical singers, actors, cantors, preachers and even nowadays rock stars and rappers should be based on the abdominal muscles. In most cases, state of the art technique for a singer will be MBS = Midsection (abdomen) Breath Support and for an actor the AGIN technique (abdominal breath support while the body is in motion, like on stage). Most clinical professional vocal abuse cases will require an exact Stroboscopy / Laryngoscopy done with the ENT specialist and the professional voice evaluation by the speech pathologist that specialize in professional voice therapy, and then the patient will be given vocal cords physiotherapy and a full 12-weeks technique for improving his breath support and tone control. While this procedure is extremely good for beginners or natural singers and actors, cantors, preachers, rock singers and rappers. It must be understood that these patients use their voice for their living their voice is their profession! Most of them simply cannot wait 12 weeks of correction like that because they will lose their jobs / places in their scheduled performances And what about the veteran singer or actor who had done a great deal of vocal training already with his voice coach and knows all about how to breath correctly? That is why this Appoggio technique will be most beneficial in these cases! Simply put, when you use Appoggio you first take in lots of air using upper chest muscles then you push in your belly muscles the diaphragm will move up pressing on the air in your lungs (that is abdominal breath support !) then you will start voice production while the pressed air is coming from below the vocal cords supporting them while vibrating, then you will use your upper chest muscles dropping them slowly controlling high pitch sounds or extra long periods of vocal singing with extra air support from the chest. So, basically, Appoggio is leaning on two breath support techniques put together the abdominal and the upper chest. A veteran singer or actor could learn that pretty quick while the beginner will be able to learn it combined with the full scale technique on the 3rd treatment providing him enough air support to hold onto his scheduled performances and thus proceeding with his 12-week voice therapy. It is good practice for the voice speech pathologist to teach the patient how to project his voice thus improving volume without putting more effort on the vocal mechanism.
  25. Opera singers, classical singers, actors, cantors, preachers and even nowadays rock stars and rappers could gain a great deal from learning one of the most elaborate and sophisticated singing techniques that was invented more than 200 years ago by the Scuola Italiana del Belcanto (translated freely into: The Italian school of beautiful singing). This ancient school of thought has produced some of the most fundamental Opera music and singing techniques that are on a daily basis use by most Opera houses in the world. But , you don't have to be an Opera singer to take advantage of the great benefits the Appoggio technique has to offer a professional vocal user You can learn to master it with an extremely good voice coach or as a part of professional voice therapy design with a voice specialist like me. Appoggio is coming from the Italian word Appogiare which means to lean on What do we lean on when we sing? On air ! Our breath support which is crucial to voice and speech production. Breath support means exactly that, the support our breath is getting before and while we produce sounds of speech or singing using the air that is coming up from our lungs moving our closed vocal cords approximately 100 times per second (Hz) for men, 200 times per second (Hz) for women and up till 400 times per second (Hz) for a child. Many singers and actors (especially beginners or natural ones- that do not attend comprehensive voice coaching as part of their training) are referred to my voice clinic by ENT surgeons after suffering from vocal nodules, vocal cords hypertrophy, detuning and other vocal abuse symptoms mainly because they do not use the correct breath support while stretching their voices to the limit. Simply put, the air support or the breath support for professional voice users like Opera singers, classical singers, actors, cantors, preachers and even nowadays rock stars and rappers should be based on the abdominal muscles. In most cases, state of the art technique for a singer will be MBS = Midsection (abdomen) Breath Support and for an actor the AGIN technique (abdominal breath support while the body is in motion, like on stage). Most clinical professional vocal abuse cases will require an exact Stroboscopy / Laryngoscopy done with the ENT specialist and the professional voice evaluation by the speech pathologist that specialize in professional voice therapy, and then the patient will be given vocal cords physiotherapy and a full 12-weeks technique for improving his breath support and tone control. While this procedure is extremely good for beginners or natural singers and actors, cantors, preachers, rock singers and rappers. It must be understood that these patients use their voice for their living their voice is their profession! Most of them simply cannot wait 12 weeks of correction like that because they will lose their jobs / places in their scheduled performances And what about the veteran singer or actor who had done a great deal of vocal training already with his voice coach and knows all about how to breath correctly? That is why this Appoggio technique will be most beneficial in these cases! Simply put, when you use Appoggio you first take in lots of air using upper chest muscles then you push in your belly muscles the diaphragm will move up pressing on the air in your lungs (that is abdominal breath support !) then you will start voice production while the pressed air is coming from below the vocal cords supporting them while vibrating, then you will use your upper chest muscles dropping them slowly controlling high pitch sounds or extra long periods of vocal singing with extra air support from the chest. So, basically, Appoggio is leaning on two breath support techniques put together the abdominal and the upper chest. A veteran singer or actor could learn that pretty quick while the beginner will be able to learn it combined with the full scale technique on the 3rd treatment providing him enough air support to hold onto his scheduled performances and thus proceeding with his 12-week voice therapy. It is good practice for the voice speech pathologist to teach the patient how to project his voice thus improving volume without putting more effort on the vocal mechanism. View full articles