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Found 11 results

  1. just some quick vocals I threw onto a Latvian buddys music track (from wikiloops) I wrote the lyrics around 9pm and I couldnt keep my eyes open and I was going to just do the vox later but I decided to "just lay down a scratch vox track"...but you know how that goes. I was dead tired so this may not be my best but I still dig it even though I was struggling a bit The vibe is a little different than my songs because essentially he never changes chords lol....gives a bit more of a stoner rock feel, which I dig Anyone figure out the story I am paraphrasing in the song? enjoy https://clyp.it/gf5nc5if okay, actually I am lying, this is just some computer generated vocals based off of a sample of my voice on an answering machine. its all fake. Even the vibrato is a vst. and i was wearing a wig
  2. Really would like to get some helpful criticism on my first song I have on the radio in order to improve my vocal performance. The song is "Love Like You" I'm currently playing 6-7 shows a week and would love advice on how to keep consistent and just improve my overall performance. I'm on SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/dylanbriscall All the songs on Early Mornings, Late Nights, and Long Roads were written and composed by me and were produced by Joel Kazmi--who’s worked with artists like The Tea Party, Rush, N’sync, Sum 41, and Anne Murray. If you don't want to listen that is absolutely cool and if you can recommend some new music or mention any great shows you've seen lately, that would be great. Cheers!
  3. Hi Folks, It has been a while since my last post. This time I wanted to do something that is quite different from my last song(s). I have always wanted to do distortion at lower ranges. I just could not find the right support mechanism and way to do this without hurting myself. I have understood how to do this safely without injuring myself. Sometimes when I am not yet sufficiently warmed up I get a itchy feeling when I try to distort. If I am careful, it goes away after a while. I am assuming that I am not doing anything wrong because I can sing like this for more than an hour and I don't feel any effects later in the day or the next day. All in all, quite a fun song to sing with an epic sounding F#5 to finish it. I wish I could get some grit on this note, but for the time being happy with where I am!
  4. https://www.instagram.com/p/87nywzJWNe/
  5. "Je T'aime" : is a romantic French-pop ballad of Lara Fabian, included in the album “Pure” (1996), Lara Fabian is a multilingual Belgian, Canadian lyric soprano had sung songs in French, Italian, Spanish, and English, Portuguese, Hebrew and Greek.The song expresses the love and pain that a woman feels for her beloved!I Hope you enjoy it!Official Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ChryssanthemisModern Music Arts Facebook Page: :https://www.facebook.com/modernmusicartsModern Music Studios Facebook Page:https://www.facebook.com/modernmusica...Composition - Lyrics: Lara Fabian & Rick AlisonVideo Editing: Modern Music StudiosElectric Guitar: Steve SovoDrums: Fotis YiannopoulosBass Guitar: Dimitris VerginisPiano: Aikaterini DeliyiannidouKeyboards: Kleanthis Konstantinidis
  6. Hello! I want to share with you my Official Cover of the song At Last. Is a song of Etta James which is one of my biggest influences in jazz singing. The song’s lyrics refer to the love of a young woman that’s finally fulfilled. This song encapsulates the youth spirit of 1960’s. First Official Release: November 15,1960 by Etta James.The song was originally written by Mack Gordon and Harry Warren for the musical film Orchestra Wives (1941), starring George Montgomery and Ann Rutherford.I Hope you enjoy it!Recorded - Produced & Mastered at Modern Music Studios Official Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ChryssanthemisModern Music Arts Facebook Page: :https://www.facebook.com/modernmusicartsModern Music Studios Facebook Page:https://www.facebook.com/modernmusica...www.modernmusicstudios.comby:Chryssanthemis (Chrysanthi Papanikolaou) &Steve Sovolos Video Production: at Modern Music Studios.
  7. Many singers identify themselves based on their voice type, such as I'm a soprano, I'm a tenor, etc. Voice type is really based on two separate ingredients: range (which notes your vocal folds can produce) and timbre (the sound of your voice). But I bet that if you ask a singer what their range is, very few will actually have the answer. That's really odd if you think about it. Athletes know their height AND weight but singers can't tell you the highest or lowest note of their range. What determines your range is the diameter of your vocal cords: the smaller the diameter (and hence) length, the higher your vocal range. An easy way to demonstrate this is to use coins as a visual example. Our smallest coin, the dime, illustrates the size of the vocal cords of the highest soprano; a penny works for the average female; for the average man, think nickel and for the lowest bass, a quarter.. Want to discover your range? It's pretty easy. First make the sound aw as in the word law or dog. Pucker your lips and allow your chin to go down at the same time. Now start on a lowish note and descend on a 5-note melody, 5-4-3-2-1 of the major scale to be exact. If you can hear your low note clearly, then adjust the pattern down a half-step (or semi-tone) and repeat the 5-4-3-2-1 pattern until your reach your lowest note. It doesn't have to be loud or even sound great. It just has to be there for it to count. When you find the note, write it down! Since most singers have 3 and 1/3 octave ranges, even beginners, your high note can be estimated by knowing your lowest note. Even if you have actually less than 3 1/3 octaves, you'll probably discover that you can produce more notes than you had expected. Here are some rough low notes and how they correspond to voice type: F (below middle C) - high soprano (expect a high A on top) D (below middle C) - regular soprano (I see this note ALL the time) A/Bb - mezzo-soprano F (2 below middle C) - alto (very rare voice type) A (2 below middle C) - high tenor E (2 below middle C) - tenor C (2 below middle C) - 2nd tenor/high baritone G (3 below middle C)- baritone E ( 3 below middle C) - bass/baritone C (3 below middle C) - bass These are of course approximate. So how low can you go?
  8. Many singers identify themselves based on their voice type, such as I'm a soprano, I'm a tenor, etc. Voice type is really based on two separate ingredients: range (which notes your vocal folds can produce) and timbre (the sound of your voice). But I bet that if you ask a singer what their range is, very few will actually have the answer. That's really odd if you think about it. Athletes know their height AND weight but singers can't tell you the highest or lowest note of their range. What determines your range is the diameter of your vocal cords: the smaller the diameter (and hence) length, the higher your vocal range. An easy way to demonstrate this is to use coins as a visual example. Our smallest coin, the dime, illustrates the size of the vocal cords of the highest soprano; a penny works for the average female; for the average man, think nickel and for the lowest bass, a quarter.. Want to discover your range? It's pretty easy. First make the sound aw as in the word law or dog. Pucker your lips and allow your chin to go down at the same time. Now start on a lowish note and descend on a 5-note melody, 5-4-3-2-1 of the major scale to be exact. If you can hear your low note clearly, then adjust the pattern down a half-step (or semi-tone) and repeat the 5-4-3-2-1 pattern until your reach your lowest note. It doesn't have to be loud or even sound great. It just has to be there for it to count. When you find the note, write it down! Since most singers have 3 and 1/3 octave ranges, even beginners, your high note can be estimated by knowing your lowest note. Even if you have actually less than 3 1/3 octaves, you'll probably discover that you can produce more notes than you had expected. Here are some rough low notes and how they correspond to voice type: F (below middle C) - high soprano (expect a high A on top) D (below middle C) - regular soprano (I see this note ALL the time) A/Bb - mezzo-soprano F (2 below middle C) - alto (very rare voice type) A (2 below middle C) - high tenor E (2 below middle C) - tenor C (2 below middle C) - 2nd tenor/high baritone G (3 below middle C)- baritone E ( 3 below middle C) - bass/baritone C (3 below middle C) - bass These are of course approximate. So how low can you go? View full articles
  9. www.vocalizing.com By Karen Oleson and Timothy Strong The genesis for this article comes from a workshop I was asked to present for a local chapter of NATS (National Assoc. of Teachers of Singing). It is only in very recent history, that performance studies in vocal jazz have been offered in academic settings. Prior to this if one wished to be a jazz singer they learned by listening to, following and copying other singers and experimenting and performing at every opportunity. Now that jazz styles have been codified it is easier for modern educators to expose jazz singing to students at almost any age. It can be confusing for both student and teacher to try to translate the voice building techniques and exercises needed to produce desired results for both classical and jazz singing. The vocal choices one makes for singing jazz are quite different from a classical singer. My students love singing jazz and are thrilled when they are accepted into their jazz choir or ensemble but are challenged to bridge the differences between techniques. So what are these differences? Can we bridge these diverse techniques? Can they be compatible? Have we been allowing style differences to interrupt the goal of voice building? The following chart suggests some of the presumed differences in vocal technique and style. Classical Technique Voice Quality: Resonant, full bodied, clear. Breath Management: Fundamental building block for voice development. Opera singers need to sing for hours over symphony orchestra with no mic(rophone). Articulation: Pure vowels, clipped consonants, years of study in at least four languages Range: Wide range, 2 1/2 to three octaves, top notes of prime importance no matter what voice type. Flexibility: Desirable for keeping voice fresh and healthy. Necessary to negotiate challenging cadenzas. Registers: Blended, seamless connection between registers Posture: Very important consideration for breath management and voice projection. Dynamics: Requires large dynamic range from pp to ff. Messa di voce important study for voice building. Vibrato: Used extensively, integral part of the vocal quality. Jazz Technique Voice Quality: Can be earthy or breathy. Close to speaking voice. Breath Management: Singers also required to sustain long phrases and scat. But since the sound doesn’t need to as resonant, or as powerful, learning nuances of mic technique becomes essential. Articulation: Very close to speaking voice. Diphthongs are used according to singers’ choice. Range: Ranges of more than an octave unnecessary but often desired. Vocal improv takes the singer to the extremes of the voice both low and high. Flexibility: Desirable for improvisation. Registers: Breaks in voice often dramatically emphasized. Posture: Appearance often cool, dispassionate Dynamics: Fewer vocal extremes required. Vibrato: Often used minimally and at end of phrases. Classical Style Pitch: Often taught to come in on top of pitch, but to sing in middle of pitch. Rhythm: Precision is important. Runs done as meteronomically accurate as possible. Rubato done at specific places in music and according to era of music and composer. Attack: The onset of the pitch is executed gently. Letting the breath lead. The pitch needs to be precisely in tune. Musical Accuracy: Do not deviate from composers apparent intent. Sing rhythm and pitches according to what is written in the score. Improvisation: Improvisation is dictated according to current trends. Improv is allowed only in certain styles and periods of music Other features: Acting and presentation skills are important in classical singing. The quality of the sound, communicating the text and music are prime considerations. Jazz Style Pitch: Sing on lower part of pitch. Enter or scoop from under pitch. Rhythm: Fluidity within the meter is allowed and desired. Sing against or after the beat. The pause is strictly kept by the drummer so that the rest of the group can play with the rhythm. Attack: Sometimes hard onset in used, other times soft. Enter from below pitch, strong blues influence. Musical Accuracy: The whole point of singing jazz is to be a co-creator with the composer in that particular moment in time. Next time it will be different (hopefully). Improvisation: Scat syllables and improvisations are influenced by current trends. Improv is the name of the game. Other features: Presentation is secondary to listening and responding to other participants while performing. Everything is new, so that cultivating awareness of what's going on around you is of primary importance. Being in the musical moment. The chart shows how singers make choices about how they use their voices depending on the style of music. So how does this affect their training? How do we bridge these diverse techniques and can they be compatible in voice building? Most music educators will agree that we want our students to sing well, no matter what the style. Breath management is an essential part of voice building and good singing. However, because classical singers sing without a mic and have to maintain a fuller resonance they are unable to play with the subtle vocal nuances that the jazz singers enjoy. The microphone assists the jazz singer in singing with a breathy tone, growling, and singing very lightly if they wish. Still, all of those choices need breath management. Articulation is an important ingredient for both types of singing. The jazz singer can be more speech-like and casual in their approach. Ex. My = ma-i. They can play with diphthongs according to their will. Classical singers are more formal in their use of language most often stay longer on the first half vowel of a diphthong. Ex. My=mah-i. It might seem that clarity of text and understandability should have priority but both classical and jazz singers may sacrifice this for a certain type of vocal sound. Classical singers spend years learning to blend the natural occurring register breaks in the voice. Although somewhat important in the jazz singer, it is minimal. The mic can assist the jazz singer with this so that they are able to play with subtle qualities and ranges that wouldn't be heard if a classical singer tried it. Today when students enter my private studio, I ask them about their musical goals. As they are exposed to voice building techniques their goals may change but the important thing for us is to help them find their way efficiently. I've experienced having younger students wanting to be country singers develop into prize winning classical singers. I've also encountered classical trained singers who were relieved to find that there are other techniques that would help them sing musical theatre or jazz. If they are interested in both aspects of singing, the lesson time needs to be subtly managed to address different musical goals. They will need to educate their ear about pitch, vibrato, and the volume of sound and resonance of the voice. A classical singer needs to hear their voice in a natural acoustical environment without artificial support. Jazz singers needs to become accustomed to hearing themselves through amplification. As pointed out in the chart, the use of vibrato, dynamics, pitch onset, voice coloring, rhythm, and many other aspects of these two diverse styles are for the most part at odds with one another. When these considerations are pointed out to the students, they have a better chance of making appropriate choices without confusion and with an appreciation of the differences. Our studio has developed publications that present voice building exercises encompassing various musical styles.* In the example presented below, the purpose of the exercise is rich and deep: ear training, pitch accuracy, flexibility, and singing in contrasting styles. In my opinion, you get the best of both worlds here - a classical warm-up, learning to sing in a major and then a minor key (great ear training), and then scat improv in both major and minor keys. With this exercise, you have an opportunity to show off your classical voice and quickly switch to jazz. These contrasting styles require different ways of using your voice. The classical style requires a more fully resonant sound including vibrato, whereas in jazz vocals, a more speech like quality is appreciated. In conclusion, clear and meaningful communication as to the differences in vocal usage and styles can make all the difference in your students’ abilities to enjoy and perform different styles of music. I have found that presenting them with practical models for bridging the gap can do wonders for their understanding and enjoyment of music making.
  10. www.vocalizing.com By Karen Oleson and Timothy Strong The genesis for this article comes from a workshop I was asked to present for a local chapter of NATS (National Assoc. of Teachers of Singing). It is only in very recent history, that performance studies in vocal jazz have been offered in academic settings. Prior to this if one wished to be a jazz singer they learned by listening to, following and copying other singers and experimenting and performing at every opportunity. Now that jazz styles have been codified it is easier for modern educators to expose jazz singing to students at almost any age. It can be confusing for both student and teacher to try to translate the voice building techniques and exercises needed to produce desired results for both classical and jazz singing. The vocal choices one makes for singing jazz are quite different from a classical singer. My students love singing jazz and are thrilled when they are accepted into their jazz choir or ensemble but are challenged to bridge the differences between techniques. So what are these differences? Can we bridge these diverse techniques? Can they be compatible? Have we been allowing style differences to interrupt the goal of voice building? The following chart suggests some of the presumed differences in vocal technique and style. Classical Technique Voice Quality: Resonant, full bodied, clear. Breath Management: Fundamental building block for voice development. Opera singers need to sing for hours over symphony orchestra with no mic(rophone). Articulation: Pure vowels, clipped consonants, years of study in at least four languages Range: Wide range, 2 1/2 to three octaves, top notes of prime importance no matter what voice type. Flexibility: Desirable for keeping voice fresh and healthy. Necessary to negotiate challenging cadenzas. Registers: Blended, seamless connection between registers Posture: Very important consideration for breath management and voice projection. Dynamics: Requires large dynamic range from pp to ff. Messa di voce important study for voice building. Vibrato: Used extensively, integral part of the vocal quality. Jazz Technique Voice Quality: Can be earthy or breathy. Close to speaking voice. Breath Management: Singers also required to sustain long phrases and scat. But since the sound doesn’t need to as resonant, or as powerful, learning nuances of mic technique becomes essential. Articulation: Very close to speaking voice. Diphthongs are used according to singers’ choice. Range: Ranges of more than an octave unnecessary but often desired. Vocal improv takes the singer to the extremes of the voice both low and high. Flexibility: Desirable for improvisation. Registers: Breaks in voice often dramatically emphasized. Posture: Appearance often cool, dispassionate Dynamics: Fewer vocal extremes required. Vibrato: Often used minimally and at end of phrases. Classical Style Pitch: Often taught to come in on top of pitch, but to sing in middle of pitch. Rhythm: Precision is important. Runs done as meteronomically accurate as possible. Rubato done at specific places in music and according to era of music and composer. Attack: The onset of the pitch is executed gently. Letting the breath lead. The pitch needs to be precisely in tune. Musical Accuracy: Do not deviate from composers apparent intent. Sing rhythm and pitches according to what is written in the score. Improvisation: Improvisation is dictated according to current trends. Improv is allowed only in certain styles and periods of music Other features: Acting and presentation skills are important in classical singing. The quality of the sound, communicating the text and music are prime considerations. Jazz Style Pitch: Sing on lower part of pitch. Enter or scoop from under pitch. Rhythm: Fluidity within the meter is allowed and desired. Sing against or after the beat. The pause is strictly kept by the drummer so that the rest of the group can play with the rhythm. Attack: Sometimes hard onset in used, other times soft. Enter from below pitch, strong blues influence. Musical Accuracy: The whole point of singing jazz is to be a co-creator with the composer in that particular moment in time. Next time it will be different (hopefully). Improvisation: Scat syllables and improvisations are influenced by current trends. Improv is the name of the game. Other features: Presentation is secondary to listening and responding to other participants while performing. Everything is new, so that cultivating awareness of what's going on around you is of primary importance. Being in the musical moment. The chart shows how singers make choices about how they use their voices depending on the style of music. So how does this affect their training? How do we bridge these diverse techniques and can they be compatible in voice building? Most music educators will agree that we want our students to sing well, no matter what the style. Breath management is an essential part of voice building and good singing. However, because classical singers sing without a mic and have to maintain a fuller resonance they are unable to play with the subtle vocal nuances that the jazz singers enjoy. The microphone assists the jazz singer in singing with a breathy tone, growling, and singing very lightly if they wish. Still, all of those choices need breath management. Articulation is an important ingredient for both types of singing. The jazz singer can be more speech-like and casual in their approach. Ex. My = ma-i. They can play with diphthongs according to their will. Classical singers are more formal in their use of language most often stay longer on the first half vowel of a diphthong. Ex. My=mah-i. It might seem that clarity of text and understandability should have priority but both classical and jazz singers may sacrifice this for a certain type of vocal sound. Classical singers spend years learning to blend the natural occurring register breaks in the voice. Although somewhat important in the jazz singer, it is minimal. The mic can assist the jazz singer with this so that they are able to play with subtle qualities and ranges that wouldn't be heard if a classical singer tried it. Today when students enter my private studio, I ask them about their musical goals. As they are exposed to voice building techniques their goals may change but the important thing for us is to help them find their way efficiently. I've experienced having younger students wanting to be country singers develop into prize winning classical singers. I've also encountered classical trained singers who were relieved to find that there are other techniques that would help them sing musical theatre or jazz. If they are interested in both aspects of singing, the lesson time needs to be subtly managed to address different musical goals. They will need to educate their ear about pitch, vibrato, and the volume of sound and resonance of the voice. A classical singer needs to hear their voice in a natural acoustical environment without artificial support. Jazz singers needs to become accustomed to hearing themselves through amplification. As pointed out in the chart, the use of vibrato, dynamics, pitch onset, voice coloring, rhythm, and many other aspects of these two diverse styles are for the most part at odds with one another. When these considerations are pointed out to the students, they have a better chance of making appropriate choices without confusion and with an appreciation of the differences. Our studio has developed publications that present voice building exercises encompassing various musical styles.* In the example presented below, the purpose of the exercise is rich and deep: ear training, pitch accuracy, flexibility, and singing in contrasting styles. In my opinion, you get the best of both worlds here - a classical warm-up, learning to sing in a major and then a minor key (great ear training), and then scat improv in both major and minor keys. With this exercise, you have an opportunity to show off your classical voice and quickly switch to jazz. These contrasting styles require different ways of using your voice. The classical style requires a more fully resonant sound including vibrato, whereas in jazz vocals, a more speech like quality is appreciated. In conclusion, clear and meaningful communication as to the differences in vocal usage and styles can make all the difference in your students’ abilities to enjoy and perform different styles of music. I have found that presenting them with practical models for bridging the gap can do wonders for their understanding and enjoyment of music making. View full articles