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Found 33 results

  1. Hi fellow vocalists! What is this thread? Why? I am starting this thread as a place to compile different trusted online teaching resources on how to begin training your falsetto or head voice both for myself and for other people looking for a one-stop shop list of this topic. What is your skill level and experience on this topic? I have been studying and training my full voice all semester and want to finally begin adding this skill to my vocal toolbox. I have a very basic sense of head voice to full voice just because of my musical background but other than that I have little to no education or experience on the techniques, practices, standards, and healthy conventions of the use of falsetto singing. Thank you guys for your help in populating this thread.
  2. The term Muscle Tension Dysphonia is a general term which could be associated with an imbalance in the muscle’s coordination and breathing patterns required to create a voice. Muscle Tension Dysphonia (often called MTD) may occur on its own, or as a result of a strained voice being pulled into the neck muscles. The reason behind this disorder is not always clear. It may be triggered by allergies, illness, acid reflux or whichever other means... Symptoms - The most common symptoms for this disorder is a change in voice quality, often associated with discomfort of the vocal cords (or voice box) while speaking or singing. Also, almost always, symptoms like hoarseness and rapines will be associated with an increased effort to talk or sing, coupled with subsequent fatigue during continuous voice use. Treatment - There is an alternative form of voice therapy which is the gold standard for the treatment of Muscle Tension Dysphonia. There are no other known treatments (outside of the Vocal Science™ Method and Technique) that can restore the muscle balance in the vocal mechanism. With that said, this unique form of therapy will help alleviate the above vocal symptoms. Ms. Diana Yampolsky is one of the world's foremost specialists on the topic of the human voice and is the creator of Vocal Science(TM), a unique and truly revolutionary accelerated vocal development technique. It is a holistic and scientific approach to voice mechanics that enables all singers and speakers to reach their full potential in an extremely short period of time. Based in Ontario, Canada, Diana works with a worldwide spectrum of clientele as a Vocal Coach/Consultant, In-Studio Vocal Production Expert and Non-Surgical Voice Repair Specialist.If you feel that you, or a loved one, may be suffering from such voice disorders like Spasmodic Dysphonia, contact us: info@vocalscience.com | 416-857-8741 View full articles
  3. Ms. Diana Yampolsky is one of the world's foremost specialists on the topic of the human voice and is the creator of Vocal Science(TM), a unique and truly revolutionary accelerated vocal development technique. It is a holistic and scientific approach to voice mechanics that enables all singers and speakers to reach their full potential in an extremely short period of time. Based in Ontario, Canada, Diana works with a worldwide spectrum of clientele as a Vocal Coach/Consultant, In-Studio Vocal Production Expert and Non-Surgical Voice Repair Specialist.If you feel that you, or a loved one, may be suffering from such voice disorders like Spasmodic Dysphonia, contact us: info@vocalscience.com | 416-857-8741
  4. Singing with rhinitis

    Singing with Rhinitis part 3

    Hi again, I tried support in these recordings but either I don't know how to do it properly because my throat still hurts. Like a grater was used on it. I'm currently using lozenges to soothe. Of late my voice has been raspy, I don't know why because my voice isn't usually like this. The ENT I went to said he sees nothing wrong with my vocal chords on the stoboscopy, he doesn't understand why I'm raspy now or sore throat. He says I'm probably going to have to do more tests. I'm still of the opinion that diaphragm breathing/ support only assists with sore neck & not throat. Any thoughts? Thanks in advance for your help (Why is there no gospel tag? Is it cause it's not really a genre, cause you can get gospel rock, gospel rap etc. It's similar to animation where it's not a genre cause it could be a drama or comedy etc? if so where do hymns sit?) Mountains of mercy - Gaithers Vocal Band https://singing-with-a-deviated-septum.tumblr.com/post/167245087814 Hosanna https://singing-with-a-deviated-septum.tumblr.com/post/167245210829
  5. Came across this info and thought many would appreciate this ENT Doctor's perspective on vocal damage and vocal health. ENT Dr. talks about the stigma of vocal injury when she heard about Adele's concert cancelations. http://www.ohniww.org/adele-voice-injury-canceled-concerts/
  6. Hello everybody! So my last thread I asked for help on mixed/ middle register. I have been working on it for a little while now but I still feel like I'm shouting and using too much air on belting high notes. It's as if I'm trying to sing it rather than just letting the sound out. Here is a comparison: and me lol: Any tips or advice is appreciated. Don't know if I'm shouting because I can't get that cord closure properly in my higher registers or if it's a bunch of different things. Woke up a little hoarse today too after singing for around 2-3 hours heavily. this is so annoying Thank you ! Love this forum for all the help I get
  7. Okay, so to get started i believe i've had articulation problems my whole life, I couldn't speak fast at all, and my voice was somewhat hoarse. Often, people would ask me to repeat myself as my voice wasn't clear. I found that when I went on a ginger/lemon fast( for about 4 days), that my voice was ever so smooth! I could articulate my words perfectly, and speaking was no longer a problem. My singing voice got way better too. I've been trying to replicate this feeling by fasting, drinking lots of water... etc, and I can't seem to get the same effect. I think I might have chronic sinusitis, and was wondering if anyone had similar problems with articulation...etc I've googled it and I can't seem to find anyone in the same dilemma as me -> or is atleast aware of this dilemma.
  8. Esteban Gomez

    Weird Vocal Issue

    So a month ago I was singing with very horrible technique and ended up straining my voice. As a result my throat felt a bit sore and I lost quite a bit of my vocal range. If I wanted to reach a higher note I would have to increase my volume. My falsetto in particular was dead. It had nowhere near the range it had before. Over time though with some vocal rest, my voice got better. Then one morning I woke up, and my falsetto felt strange. When I did my falsetto, especially higher falsetto notes it felt as if though I was doing vocal fry. The notes would sort of cut in and out, but the rest of my voice felt a lot better. Now that sensation is gone, but the issue I have is that I can't really do my falsetto at a super low volume. I used to be able to sing in my falsetto at really low volumes, almost to the point where I couldn't hear it. This was useful for practicing transitioning from my falsetto to full voice. However, now whenever I try to do my falsetto at this super low volume, nothing comes out. I have to go a bit louder. While it is still really quite, there are times when I need to be even more quite, and I just cannot be quite without my falsetto cutting out. I've also noticed a lack of control with my falsetto which is something I didn't have a couple days ago. Sometimes its a little hard to maintain a pitch. Also, if I try to make the falsetto louder, it dissolves into what sounds like a fully connected register with chord closure. (THIS IS A REALLY STRANGE FEELING). The transition has almost no break. Its a recent issue, but is it also serious issue? Should I just do vocal rest? Please help!
  9. Rlynnclifford

    Vocal fold hemorrhage

    Hello, I am having a serious and rather uncommon vocal issue and I was wondering if someone could shed some light on the situation. In early May of this year, I was very, very careless with my voice. I had always sung through basically blunt force trauma, but my voice had always rebounded- except this time, it didn't. For months I had pain after speaking , loss of range and projection problems. Finally, I was diagnosed with a hemorrhage of the false vocal folds. I was told it wasn't permanent, and put on modified, not total, vocal rest. From what I understand, true vocal fold hemorrhages are extremely serious...but I can find no information about false vocal fold hemorrhage. It's been about a month and I'm still having problems with all of this, if not worse problems. My concern is, what role do false vocal folds play in speaking/singing? If it's just a false hemorrhage, wouldn't that have a minimal effect on my speaking voice and vocal range? I often get hoarse as well. I'm very concerned with scarring and permanent changes.
  10. Hi guys, I know the question title seems to hold the easiest answer, but bear with me, please. When I manage to find time to practice, I usually do both lip bubbles and tongue trills as part of my warm up, starting a bit lower in my range (chest voice) and going through my bridge to my head voice, always keeping the resonance in my head. What I noticed is I have a much harder time bridging when I'm doing tongue trills because my folds usually come apart many times, even after I'm warmed up, if I don't pay attention. So, I was wondering why this happens to me , and if it is common with other people too. Cheers
  11. The Importance of Vocal Anatomy for Singers The human voice is powered by breath, produced by vibrations, and shaped by resonance. "In every field the man who can merely do things without knowing why is at a disadvantage to the one who can not only build but also tell you just why he is building in that way. This is especially noticeable when the prescribed cycle does not obey the laws it is supposed to: then the labourer must sit by with folded hands while the mechanic or engineer comes in and adjusts the delicate mechanism. " Reuben Fine, Chess Grandmaster, Psychologist, Professor and Author We all can talk and sing without any further knowledge of the physiological mechanism that sets off our voice. It is when we start studying to become better at our craft, that we challenge ourselves in learning new techniques and in correcting bad habits and behaviour to achieve a specific sound. During our studies we will sooner or later get in touch with the topic of vocal anatomy and its terms. Knowing the anatomic elements and their function is essential for the purpose of communication, be it between vocal instructor and student, or in literature. The standardized anatomic terminology ensures that we can exchange ideas, techniques and instructions with great precision. The study of vocal anatomy will in addition help the vocalist to understand the mechanics and limitations of the human voice, and will function as a guide to choose those vocal techniques that respect the anatomic background of the voice. The newly acquired knowledge will increase awareness of the different parts involved in the creation of our voice, and will support us to develop a feeling for these organs during singing. What are these organs and how do they work? The background section at Lead Vocals has an article that describes the mechanism of our voice and the involved organs. Find out how our voice is created in the human body, how we achieve a powerful voice, how we produce pitch, and how we influence our vocal qualities at - http://www.leadvocals.ca/background/anatomy-of-the-voice Additional Information Our Practice Section at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/practice Try to Sing Along at Lead Vocals http://www.leadvocals.ca/lyrics/songs What is Lead Vocals? Lead Vocals is a free of charge online resource for aspiring vocalists, who are learning the craft of singing and who practice their art by singing along to playback recordings and to other selected musical performances on video. All recordings are hand selected and the lyrics are spot on matching to the performance of the lead vocalist. The tool allows for quick access to practice specific parts within a song. We especially took care in avoiding clutter and disruptive advertising. Follow us on Social Media https://facebook.com/leadvocals.ca https://plus.google.com/+LeadvocalsCa https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadvocals https://www.twitter.com/leadvocalsca https://www.youtube.com/LeadvocalsCa
  12. Hey everyone! My name is David and I'm from a small town in the Yukon, Canada. The town I'm in is about 400 people and doesn't have much of a musical scene so I thought I'd check out this site :). So ever since 2014 I've been getting mentored by a songwriting/production group in the music industry. They've worked with everyone from Maroon 5 to Fifth Harmony (most recently). It all happened after I reached out to them with my lyrics. They immediately took me on and in these two years I've worked on honing in my lyrical and melodic abilities and even taught myself how to play the guitar (within this last year). The last part of this puzzle is singing. I've always felt this fire deep in me ever since I was young. But I was too scared to try out singing in front of teachers until recently. So within the last 2 months I've gone to about 3 or 4 online singing lessons, which I've been feeling pretty great about. I made a promise to myself that before I email these guys something new, it'll be when I can sing decently enough to intrigue them. I know I have it in me. Aside from this introduction (I hope I'm posting in the right place). I'd love to get some feedback and tips and even more than that after I share some videos here. I see that this community has some vocal coaches, so it would be awesome to hear from everyone. Singers and teachers alike!
  13. https://app.box.com/s/xtczgyz7dgjy48mtrmqg0yydtkwh0466 Whitesnake cover!
  14. Kenshin13

    Breathy Voice

    Hello. I'm not a singer but I thought it would be the best place to seek advice. I've been having issues for a while about my voice. It leaks a lot of breath or air. My voice is quiet, lacks clarity. If I go to loud places I struggle to be heard. I lose my voice if I have to try speak loud or push for more volume. I'm far too quiet no matter what I do. The more I push for volume the breather my voice gets then my throat feels scratchy. If I done a lot of speaking and shouting on A night out my vocal cords are swollen, but weirdly it seems clearer and deeper, like the swollen cords cover up the air leak or something. Ive tried loads of exercises to improve chord closure but I can't seem to improve the quality of my voice. Can someone help me or offer me any advice? Ive also had my vocal cords checked with a scope. Which I was told is healthy... thanks
  15. The last few months I have noticed less reliability in the upper parts of my head voice. I used to be able to hit a very clean, clear, well connected G5. It started to get a little scratchy, but still there. Now, I can barely hit an E5, and the highest note I can now reliably hit is a D5. What I don't get is that my voice generally feels better than ever. I've been training with Ken Tamplin's Vocal Academy, which has very little head voice development, so I have been doing some basic head voice exercises every so often. I've been getting AMAZING results everywhere else, but the loss of the highest notes makes me think something is up. I do everything by the books - I don't strain for notes, trying to keep my larynx as neutral as possible throughout my range, drink lots of water, steam my voice most days, and I feel absolutely no discomfort when singing. I don't care too much as I rarely use this part of my voice but I can't afford to lose any more notes from the top - I don't want this to effect my high C. I have been on complete vocal rest the last few days - just done some basic lip rolls and tried to vocalise up there but still, the highest note I can barely hit in head voice is E5. Any suggestions of what I can do? I can't afford to have my cords looked at by an ENT so home-remedies and cheap suggestions only, thanks.
  16. Collin571

    Just Onsets!

    I'm starting to realize after breath support onsets have got to be the most important thing in singing, I realized while singing at work the other day(singing the opening to LA devotee by Panic!, in a deep sinatra style) that I could sing those lines in a deep timbre, which correct me if I'm wrong is a thick fold variation on those notes, but I would start to run out of breath and have to start singing more thin to finish the line. Then I thought well what if I started thin and went thick, the difference was my thin initiation took less breath and it was easier to sustain. So after playing around with different onsets it was apparent that the onset if done properly led to a beautiful balance of head and chest resonances while maintaining the air supply. So my question to yous guise is what is the best way to approach an onset so that you retain the most air possible and how does it differ when onsets are initiated with consonants versus vowels and vice versa?
  17. Based in Toronto Canada, Ms. Yampolsky's coaching concentrates not just on the voice, but on the performer as a whole. Her approach can boost stage confidence by improving the voice's range, pitch and power. She believes that a singer has 25% natural talent, while 75% of a singer's performance relies on technical training. Her special exercises enable the singer to meet any combinations of pitch and duration of sound. Ms. Yampolsky views the body as an instrument whose quality of well being determines the quality of sound produced and recognizes that the voice is a reflection of the 'inner self.' All courses are customized to the unique needs of each individual singer and program the brain using visualization and vocal repetition. The Vocal Science (TM) Method alleviates strain on vocal cords and develops proper use of facial and abdominal muscles while stressing posture. Mainly, vocal cord paralysis occurs after related (and unrelated) surgeries such as, for example: Thyroid removal surgery, spinal fusion and even simple surgical procedures that require surgical intubation (Tracheotomy). Often, those tubes are inserted incorrectly and, as a result, the vocal cord(s) could be damaged and/or paralyzed. The voice could be easily jeopardized if you have experienced stroke, or even unrelated surgeries, for example, due to even any accident, which requires surgical procedure. Of course if (God forbid) the sufferer had any growths like tumor, or even a simple nodule or polyp on a vocal cord, removal of any of the above could easily cause vocal damage and vocal cord(s) paralysis. The Vocal Science™ technique is the only alternative way, which could dramatically improve ones’ speech and even singing voice for that matter. The Vocal Science method is a holistic and alternative approach to voice mechanics. By the virtue of fact, the method suggests to remove the pressure of the sound from he vocal cords and lift the voice to the alternative muscles, which once put to work together in full conjunction and coordination, will amplify the sound 4 to 5 times over and will employ the wholesome vocal mechanism to work in its fullest capacity and with no pain or strain on the vocal anatomy. The space on the bottom of the throat is also released and thus, allows the room for the natural herbal and homeopathic remedies to work in the full force, which will greatly aid to the patients’ voice/vocal recovery. Please be advised that this process of restoration of the voice (after the vocal cords/vocal folds paralysis had occurred) is extremely tedious and intense. It could be also a very emotional process on the patient’s part. Obviously, their voice is not sounding the same and, at times, it Is difficult for them to pronounce certain syllables. I have seen a lot of tears in my studio/clinic, which sometimes served a positive deed, as after a good cry, the patient had regrouped and caught a second breath, so to speak. By that point, they got their sadness out of their heart and soul by releasing their emotions and even their voice became lighter and more compliant to the instruction. A lot of the patients, understandably, possess a lot of ‘stuffed-up’ emotions. That, by itself, could be one of the reasons of their voice disorder. I receive a lot of patients with thyroid problems and even removed thyroids due to cancer. In holistic teaching, the thyroid represents suppressed emotions and hurts. So, in the first place, they were experiencing something that, emotionally, they could not comprehend. Majority of the diseases are emotionally induced and then, they manifest in the physical body. For example: A bad marriage could cause a lot of anger and anguish. The human liver (in the holistic understanding) does represent suppressed anger. When one of the spouses dies of cancer, it is almost 100 out of 100 that it would be the cancer of thyroid or, even more so, cancer of liver. That’s, of course, if the marriage was full of disagreements and fights. So, from our side, we are wishing you peace and harmony in whatever you are doing in your life path. That will keep you happy and healthy & most likely by osmosis will keep your voice intact. View full articles
  18. Mainly, vocal cord paralysis occurs after related (and unrelated) surgeries such as, for example: Thyroid removal surgery, spinal fusion and even simple surgical procedures that require surgical intubation (Tracheotomy). Often, those tubes are inserted incorrectly and, as a result, the vocal cord(s) could be damaged and/or paralyzed. The voice could be easily jeopardized if you have experienced stroke, or even unrelated surgeries, for example, due to even any accident, which requires surgical procedure. Of course if (God forbid) the sufferer had any growths like tumor, or even a simple nodule or polyp on a vocal cord, removal of any of the above could easily cause vocal damage and vocal cord(s) paralysis. The Vocal Science™ technique is the only alternative way, which could dramatically improve ones’ speech and even singing voice for that matter. The Vocal Science method is a holistic and alternative approach to voice mechanics. By the virtue of fact, the method suggests to remove the pressure of the sound from he vocal cords and lift the voice to the alternative muscles, which once put to work together in full conjunction and coordination, will amplify the sound 4 to 5 times over and will employ the wholesome vocal mechanism to work in its fullest capacity and with no pain or strain on the vocal anatomy. The space on the bottom of the throat is also released and thus, allows the room for the natural herbal and homeopathic remedies to work in the full force, which will greatly aid to the patients’ voice/vocal recovery. Please be advised that this process of restoration of the voice (after the vocal cords/vocal folds paralysis had occurred) is extremely tedious and intense. It could be also a very emotional process on the patient’s part. Obviously, their voice is not sounding the same and, at times, it Is difficult for them to pronounce certain syllables. I have seen a lot of tears in my studio/clinic, which sometimes served a positive deed, as after a good cry, the patient had regrouped and caught a second breath, so to speak. By that point, they got their sadness out of their heart and soul by releasing their emotions and even their voice became lighter and more compliant to the instruction. A lot of the patients, understandably, possess a lot of ‘stuffed-up’ emotions. That, by itself, could be one of the reasons of their voice disorder. I receive a lot of patients with thyroid problems and even removed thyroids due to cancer. In holistic teaching, the thyroid represents suppressed emotions and hurts. So, in the first place, they were experiencing something that, emotionally, they could not comprehend. Majority of the diseases are emotionally induced and then, they manifest in the physical body. For example: A bad marriage could cause a lot of anger and anguish. The human liver (in the holistic understanding) does represent suppressed anger. When one of the spouses dies of cancer, it is almost 100 out of 100 that it would be the cancer of thyroid or, even more so, cancer of liver. That’s, of course, if the marriage was full of disagreements and fights. So, from our side, we are wishing you peace and harmony in whatever you are doing in your life path. That will keep you happy and healthy & most likely by osmosis will keep your voice intact.
  19. Ms. Yampolsky's coaching concentrates not just on the voice, but on the performer as a whole. Her approach can boost stage confidence by improving the voice's range, pitch and power. She believes that a singer has 25% natural talent, while 75% of a singer's performance relies on technical training. Her special exercises enable the singer to meet any combinations of pitch and duration of sound. Ms. Yampolsky views the body as an instrument whose quality of well being determines the quality of sound produced and recognizes that the voice is a reflection of the 'inner self.' All courses are customized to the unique needs of each individual singer and program the brain using visualization and vocal repetition. The Vocal Science (TM) Method alleviates strain on vocal cords and develops proper use of facial and abdominal muscles while stressing posture.
  20. Hi, I'm new on this forum. I'm 15 years old and I'm going through my vocal change so maybe that has something to do with my problems. I have two main problems. The first one is my clean voice sounds really gay. When I talk I don't sound like this but when I sing (especially high notes) I do. The other problem is I'd like to sing aggressively, but I don't know how. I'd like to sing aggressively but without screaming, something like Jeremy McKinnon (vocalist of A Day to Remember) when he sings choruses, but I don't know which techniques I have to use (I don't actually know what the tags I've put on this topic really mean) or if my voice is able to do it (I think I have a high range but I'm not sure either). As you can see I'm quite lost, still don't know if I have a good voice or a really bad one, maybe singing is just not my thing, who knows. However, I'd really appreciate it if someone could give me a solution to my problems. Thanks a lot. PD: Sorry for my English.
  21. Felipe Carvalho

    Felipe Carvalho - Would?

    Hi folks, this is a song that the last time I was not quite happy on how it was sounding, new version with some differences on the approach: Thanks everyone that can take a listen
  22. Hey everyone! Just wanted to check in with some interesting reflections that I had recently with the folks who could benefit. So for background, I recently started med school and we have to take a pretty detailed course in gross anatomy that covers the entire body head to toe. I found that as a singing student, learning gross anatomy in lab and lecture has been extremely beneficial. There are so many things that we talk about and try to cue ourselves and others to do in order to achieve certain qualities in vocal production that now seem so much less mysterious, mystical, and/or unclear to me. 1. Twang - quacking, pharyngeal voice, narrowing of ari-epiglottic funnel/space/whatever people want to call it. I have seen SO many thread about "what is twang, how do we do it"... seriously, cutting into the back of the pharynx and looking at the picture like this taught a very real lesson of how close the muscular back of the tongue is to the epiglottis, which creates the necessary twang to help us negotiate pressure to adduct our vocal folds for good singing. This explains why the cue of "raise back of tongue to molars" can help get the epiglottis to move if the student does not know what it means to "twang". There are three muscles attached to the pharynx called "superior, middle and inferior pharyngeal constrictors", the infrahyoid muscles, and some of the tongue (more on that later) muscles... some of the enemies of beginning singers. 2. Support - If anyone wants any cool pictures of support muscles, please let me know and then tell me how real you want the pictures to look haha I have a better understanding now of... what muscles are used in support, how to use them, do I tighten/tense them or not?! how proper support is almost as easy as learning a few things about what proper "bracing" for daily activities and athletics is from a physical therapist. How you can squeeze your glutes to "set" the spinal alignment before you work on the breath so you KNOW 100% that you are straight. How the pelvic floor contributes. How scapular stability relates to consistent support and expansion. How pulling in from the stomach is invariably requires strength and command of the transverse abdominal muscle, so telling students to "just relax and breathe and pull in but stay relaxed" can be counter-productive because they don't realize they're engaging one muscle while keeping the other muscles in check. Also, Phil is totally right about the "fist into the gut" feeling, and Marnell is def talking about the transversus abdominis when he talks about the sensations of support (vomiting, etc) in that 1 hour long video. 3. Soft palate, the nasopharynx, sinuses - After seeing the sinuses in real life and finding them myself, I can definitely say I have a new appreciation for how vibrations and sound and fluid all interact with the sinuses in the nasopharynx. Also a new appreciation for how bad head colds with sinus problems can be. 4. Ken Tamplin's tongue - that's right, I said it. So many questions are asked every year about "wtf his tongue is doing" and if it is okay or not. My personal verdict on the topic is now out: what I learned suggests that it is indeed okay to change the shape of the tongue in the mouth while singing if you want - to a certain extent. The genioglossus (the largest tongue protruding muscle) and some other tongue muscles are attached to a bone can cause unintentional larynx raising (as larynx is also connected to said bone lol) if the tongue is protruded too far out, but where and how to shape the tongue otherwise is rather individual and totally cool if you can still form your vowels and consonants the way you want (I admit some of Ken's vowels are not how I personally would sing my vowels but I know he likes em and that's cool): this is because the muscles that do that part of tongue shaping "making concave U's or fat lizard tongues or flat tongues" are NOT attached to any bones, making them totally cool to do what you want with them, including help you form consonants. Stopping myself from going on forever now. tl;dr: Med school anatomy has confirmed to me and taught me even more about many things in vocal pedagogy that I was not sure about before, feel free to discuss how you guys might have already known this stuff or whatever or ask for cool pictures.
  23. Hello TMV members, I have an issue with my voice, sometimes it just won't thin out/conduct properly. Some days the break seems fluid and I can bridge the (full) voice all the way to an B5, with various mixed shades too. On other days, my voice completely fails apart, and I can't even have the vocal cords conduct an F4. Instead I get screechy distortion and the voice seems kind of dry and harsh, almost as if it was completely stuck in chest mode. It feels like the cords just refused to vibrate where they should. The amount of frustration caused by the issue would make me shout some really angry tones if it was possible given the situation. I wonder if there might be a condition that might cause the issue, which I am not aware of? Like irritated/inflamed vocal cords? This time around the problem was almost certainly caused by a bad cough I am having, but it isn't the first time. I would really appreciate if you guys knew any exercises or anything else that might help. Any information regarding the issue is warmly welcomed! I had to work a lot to eliminate that screechy distortion (or poor conductance) in/above the passaggio, which I am not sure if that's normal either, perhaps some coaches here know. Shame to have the problem re-appear randomly...
  24. Chryssanthemis

    Chryssanthemis - Listen (Live)

    "Listen" is οne of four new songs written for the feature version of Dreamgirls (originally a 1981 Broadway musical). Ιt's lyrics make reference to tenacity, love, the refusal to defer dreams and finally rise towards fame.In the film version of Dreamgirls, Knowles portrays the character of Deena Jones, a pop singer loosely based on Motown star Diana Ross. The story explores the life of The Dreamettes (based on The Supremes), a fictional 1960s group of three female singers,whose manager Curtis Taylor (based on Berry Gordy and played by Jamie Foxx) manipulates their personal and professional relationships.I Hope you Enjoy it!Official Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ChryssanthemisModern Music Arts Facebook Page: :https://www.facebook.com/modernmusicartsModern Music Studios Facebook Page:https://www.facebook.com/modernmusica...Video Editing: Modern Music StudiosElectric Guitar: Steve SovolosPianoAikaterini DeliyiannidouBass Guitar: Dimitris VerginisKeyboards: Kleanthis KonstantinidisDrums: Fotis Yiannopoulos