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Found 52 results

  1. First of all, just thought it would be nice to point out that i sent this question to Rob by email. And he sent me here, so that he could answer it in public and everyone could benefit. What a nice guy Rob is. Been learning a lot from his program, still studying and working on all the stuff, registered not long ago. It's quite a lot of content to fully diggest and grasp!. And most of all, actually apply!. Which is awesome of course, haven't had a course as detailed/comprehensive as this one. Not even close. Before i bought it i was actually wondering why many people called it "comprehensive", now it makes total sense. And the time i spent wondering on if i should get it, could have been spent further studying and applying the techniques. So i encourage others to start ASAP. On to the question, might be a rather simple question, that i probably know the answer too but just am not concious enough to apply it, it can be easy to forget. So of course asking will save me the doubts. And hopefully others as well. This quote from the program/book "Engaging the respiratory system sufficiently to optimize your phonations as a singer is not intuitive for the body. Even after 30 years of singing, training and teaching around the world, i still, to this day, have to be very conscientious of engaging my respiratory support when i train and sing. If i do not, just like everyone else, i start sounding like a duck (and get tired from all the squeezing)." So basically what i took from this was, concious support is mandatory, both in training and singing. Basically you should ALWAYS engage some sort of support. Both in training and singing?. Now i didn't include this part in the email but i want too add a question, how "key" is this?. I think a lot of students these days need a lot of "value guidance" in order to fully recognize what they should be working on. It seems self explanatory, but on a scale of 1/5 - i'd like to know where this stands specifically in your program. Just for perspective. Which btw reminds me of a feature i really liked in the program, in which Rob basically does what i just said. He outlines the most "key" lessons to work on of every section/module. And of course each one also has long detailed descriptions/ illustrations / examples / and my favorite - benefits and troubleshooting. He clearly put A LOT of effort into this. Very thoughtful effort, might i add. Since a lot of programs out there don't go into such detail. Anyways, That's the question. (With some extra rambling included). Heck in a sense that's a mini review. Although i could say a lot more. Rob deserves the praise. Also thanks Rob for encouraging me to get registered, there is clearly a lot of value in this forum i was missing on.
  2. Hey all, A few months ago, I decided to get The Four Pillars. Since then, I've looked over different areas of the program, several times .At the time, I was too busy to really get into it all, and start practicing regularly, but I've just now got things together, so I can begin doing just that. A little background on me: I got into this singing thing a few years ago. It was something I was fascinated with for a long time, but I didn't know it was a skill that could be learned and developed. Once I found out that it was, I immediately decided that I wanted to learn. To try to accomplish that, for a while, I took lessons, and used several programs, including CVT and Singing Success. I even had purchased Singing Success forum access for a few months. I'm now going to express why I feel this is the best program around, if you really want to learn how to sing. This program is as thorough as a program gets. A comprehensive book, with an exhaustive assortment of video instructionals, explanations, and pre-recorded workouts. There's order, and guidance in this program. You're not completely overwhelmed by it all. You know what you're doing, when you should be doing it, and why you're doing it. The very science of it all is explained, but you aren't overwhelmed with a flood of terms. Still not quite sure about something? Check out the video library or come to the forum, because there's actually a forum where the creator of it all is actually active, and answering questions, everyday. This makes Singing Success look like an unfinished product. I bought access to that forum, for a while, and while it did show far more exercises, there was no order. You didn't know when to work on things, or why you were doing things. Forum was barely active. I ended up deciding to get that program. It was a 7 page ebook and a bunch of exercises in MP3 format. No direction. I used the exercises for about 3 weeks, and stopped. Looks, and sounds good, but no substance. For example, they put in examples of the whistle register being used, and no explanation of how to use it, at all. Perfect example of the entire system. Looks good, but nothing behind it. There were also examples of singing in several different styles, but no instructions or explanation regarding the dynamics necessary to sing in those styles. Should have just been called "Mirage Music" system, because it looked like something, but it wasn't. CVT was better, but it did not go as far as this system does. There's a book, and exercises, but reading, and hearing, is not enough. Some things are hard to pick up just from reading descriptions, and hearing them done. And when you're not able to bridge that gap, there's a dead forum. There are vocal effects and techniques in this book that sound great, but are not easy to perform. This can be dangerous, because if you think you are doing what you're reading and hearing, but you are not performing the exercises and techniques properly, you can seriously damage your voice. With The Four Pillars, you can read about the technique, hear the technique, and see the technique. Still have something you're not sure about? Go to the forum, ask, and you'll get assistance pretty quickly. Nothing is left to chance here. It's an honest, complete program. If you want to know how much confidence and honesty is behind this program, simply look at the fact that the author of the program owns this site, and there is a forum here, where you're allowed to talk about other programs. The author of the program isn't even trying to keep people from knowing there are other options besides The Four Pillars. A testament to how unparalleled this system is. If you're serious about learning how to sing, this is the only complete system. Learning to sing is like going to the gym. You use proper form, you do the right exercises, you work hard, and you will end up with a very strong body. Something that looks great and performs extremely well. The same applies to singing. You use proper technique, do the right exercises, and workout your voice enough, you will end up with a very strong voice. A voice that sounds great, and performs extremely well. The Four Pillars is the only gym regimen you need for your voice. And to add one more thing, some may be skeptical of whether this program is for you. For a while, I was. As some may have already guessed from my name, I'm into R&B/Soul music. There's an assumption that R&B is a genre where everybody sings softly. This isn't true. There are plenty of singers who sing with power and rasp. For example, Beyonce, Jazmine Sullivan, R. Kelly, Tyrese, and many more. I'm a guy, who's been practicing for a while, and I've got okay range (D2 - C5 in full voice and somewhere like E4 - A5 in falsetto), but a lot of where my strength is at is the lower part of my range. After a while, I managed to get my head voice to not sound like a dying cat, but still sounds like the notes are weak, up near the top of it. This program will build up my musculature so that I have strength and power up there, when I sing in that part of my range, while still working out other parts of my voice (Remember, NEVER skip leg day ). Also, for those interested in Pop or R&B, the scale exercises in this system, and several of the "run" exercises, will also train your voice so that you have the agility necessary to perform those riffs and runs. This is truly a program that is going to help tremendously, no matter what style you sing, and it's the only program out there that is thorough and resourceful enough to reduce your margin of error by this much. And did I mention that new videos are regularly added to the library? Enough said.
  3. No offense David, but if you are going to attack my industry and belittle the numerous GOOD vocal training programs that are out there and, more importantly, spoil the benefits of training with vocal programs for viewers, we'll have to call you out. David, the point that you have to work your song into the parts in songs, and to do that slowly is a good point. But to tell people to not invest in a vocal training program is misleading, hypocritical and doesn't enhance your message at all. What added value to add to your video by telling people to NOT train their voices with a training program. Could this possibly be because, ... you don't have a vocal program to offer? Because rest assured, if you did, you would not be saying this. Having spoke to you on the phone personally and gotten to know a little bit about what your motivations are, you wouldn't do that. Making videos on YouTube, makes you a video voice tip guy, not a voice coach David. Which, I suppose is ok, but you need to firm up your details David. If you had 20 to 30 real students a week, you would understand more about what vocal workouts and training are doing and more importantly, how to use it to help students get stronger. All the "work on the notes and parts in the song" point your making, doesn't mean shit... if you can't sing in pitch, can't get a good onset, know nothing about vowels and resonance, have no endurance, and on and on. Apart from the fact that vocal workouts and scales have been used for over 400 years in the art of singing. Now for the record, I think we should also let people know that .... you actually bought my vocal program, and you purchased Vendera's program and I suspect others. You have benefitted greatly from our content and ideas, and now you steer your viewers away from the same tools you used yourself? Seriously? You are a talented guy, you make content that doesn't dish your colleagues and advise you viewers to get less educated about singing can't you? May I suggest that you redo this video and simply make your message, "Slow down and work on parts in your songs, and be sure to not only do vocal training". BTW: Here are all my client reviews from the TVS training program, www.TheFourPillarsofSinging.com... These are real people folks, that have benefitted greatly from my program. http://www.thefourpillarsofsinging.com/reviews/
  4. No offense David, but if you are going to attack my industry and belittle the numerous GOOD vocal training programs that are out there and, more importantly, spoil the benefits of training with vocal programs for viewers, we'll have to call you out. David, the point that you have to work your song into the parts in songs, and to do that slowly is a good point. But to tell people to not invest in a vocal training program is misleading, hypocritical and doesn't enhance your message at all. What added value to add to your video by telling people to NOT train their voices with a training program. Could this possibly be because, ... you don't have a vocal program to offer? Because rest assured, if you did, you would not be saying this. Having spoke to you on the phone personally and gotten to know a little bit about what your motivations are, you wouldn't do that. Making videos on YouTube, makes you a video voice tip guy, not a voice coach David. Which, I suppose is ok, but you need to firm up your details David. If you had 20 to 30 real students a week, you would understand more about what vocal workouts and training are doing and more importantly, how to use it to help students get stronger. All the "work on the notes and parts in the song" point your making, doesn't mean shit... if you can't sing in pitch, can't get a good onset, know nothing about vowels and resonance, have no endurance, and on and on. Apart from the fact that vocal workouts and scales have been used for over 400 years in the art of singing. Now for the record, I think we should also let people know that .... you actually bought my vocal program, and you purchased Vendera's program and I suspect others. You have benefitted greatly from our content and ideas, and now you steer your viewers away from the same tools you used yourself? Seriously? You are a talented guy, you make content that doesn't dish your colleagues and advise you viewers to get less educated about singing can't you? May I suggest that you redo this video and simply make your message, "Slow down and work on parts in your songs, and be sure to not only do vocal training". BTW: Here are all my client reviews from the TVS training program, www.TheFourPillarsofSinging.com... These are real people folks, that have benefitted greatly from my program. http://www.thefourpillarsofsinging.com/reviews/ View full articles
  5. VOCAL TRAINING INDUSTRY WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW! Click The Top Left Menu To View Videos In The Video Playlist
  6. VOCAL TRAINING INDUSTRY WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW! Click The Top Left Menu To View Videos In The Video Playlist View full articles
  7. THE FOUR PILLARS OF SINGING THE INTEGRATED TRAINING ROUTINES Video Workout Demonstrations That Teach Singers How to Practice! Robert Lunte, founder of The Four Pillars of Singing offers an impromptu screen capture presentation of the Integrated Training Routines found in the TVS training program, The Four Pillars of Singing. The Four Pillars of Singing offers very clear instructions and guidance on how to train and practice vocal technique to make your singing stronger and more coordinated. Like no other vocal training program on the market today, TFPOS leaves no questions unanswered and removes all the mystery about singing great and what you have to do achieve great singing skills. If "free secret tips" on YouTube are not getting you any lasting results, that is because you HAVE to train! No tips or information, regardless of how good it might be, will do anything for you, if you do not take the time and energy to practice. If you are prepared to train and get serious about vocal training, The Four Pillars of Singing is a program you should take a serious look at.
  8. THE FOUR PILLARS OF SINGING THE INTEGRATED TRAINING ROUTINES Video Workout Demonstrations That Teach Singers How to Practice! Robert Lunte, founder of The Four Pillars of Singing offers an impromptu screen capture presentation of the Integrated Training Routines found in the TVS training program, The Four Pillars of Singing. The Four Pillars of Singing offers very clear instructions and guidance on how to train and practice vocal technique to make your singing stronger and more coordinated. Like no other vocal training program on the market today, TFPOS leaves no questions unanswered and removes all the mystery about singing great and what you have to do achieve great singing skills. If "free secret tips" on YouTube are not getting you any lasting results, that is because you HAVE to train! No tips or information, regardless of how good it might be, will do anything for you, if you do not take the time and energy to practice. If you are prepared to train and get serious about vocal training, The Four Pillars of Singing is a program you should take a serious look at. View full articles
  9. Don't let any other video or coach try to tell you that less information, less explanation, less features and less value in a vocal training program is a benefit to you.
  10. Don't let any other video or coach try to tell you that less information, less explanation, less features and less value in a vocal training program is a benefit to you. "Less is More" doesn't get you more benefit, or more of what you need, or more understanding about singing. It just gets you... Less! View full articles
  11. I discover my singing which have lots of flaws including phasing problem, some words are flat. Actually i rarely speak eng. with my friend s and just want to know, u guys can get what I sing??? I have changed few melodies and the mood of the song, is that a bit strange or over?? I dun mind any cristism of my performance, just be curious of western ppl opinions. Thx!!!
  12. Hi guys! I'm Rodrigo again. I hadn't been training due  flu I had and now I started again. As you may guess, I'm a begginer and I have tons of ideas and questions. This one is really cool, and you will see why. I found out that the FBR is awesome but it has tons of information and for the part-time musician, it is critical to know what to practice in order to make more productive sessions. I've been playing gutiar for 15 years now, and also I play a lot of styles (classical, rock, acoustic, percusive, etc) and the key to progress and still have fun is to have goals. I mean, personal, realistic and short-terms goals that you can acomplish in a few weeks or months and then move on to another thing. Set a new goal, and keep moving. Now that I'm into singing, I can have practice sessions for 45 min 5 to 7 times a week. Some of them even until 1 hour. So I was doing this things to get better in things that I need to get better now. I do this: ---Resonant tracking 1 T&T Slow then Fast 2 T&R the same way and 3 R&R only fast ---Support training: Robert's excercises and a few more that I've been doing since I took classical lessons, more focused to feeling the awearness of the support process ( really easy ones, but gives awesome results) ---Onsets Well there is a lot here in the book. I have to get more compression, and I tend to sing with a lot of dark overtones amplified. And an excess of these does not sound well for me. What do I do? The following: Q&R since F3 to F3 (Sometimes G4 or A4, if I can do them without push, pain or constrictions) and I repeat 2 times that onset in every note, except for Db4 to E4, when I repeat 4 times the onset. I do this because my bridge is around those notes. And Robert says we have to practice those notes harder because those are the difficult ones (and I is so true!). Then I follow with a few attemps of A&R. If it is too hard for me, I don't do it. I listen to my body. After that, I do edging onsets in the same range, maybe 2 times per note. Sometimes 3. ---Sirens Well, not too much to say here. I do melodic 5th as Robert show us. Two times, at least, focusing on Q&R onset and some of T&R. I don't go too high, at least not for now. I hope my way to train this can inspire you to think and organize your practice schedule if you're not doing it now. For the most advanced TVS people... how do you practice the FBR? Do you think I'm doing it right? Rock-on!
  13. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>>
  14. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>> View full articles
  15. Hello guys,my name is Luka I must say that only after few hours of reading book,and about hour of watching videos ,I was able to do this(It is probably bad and for sure needs more practice ,but still before this it was like dream for me to hit those notes without hurting my voice ) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_EfHMEXv17k
  16. I have just recently returned from my quick and somewhat short, but very impactful, trip from London.Within only a little bit more than a week’s period of time, I was able to provide my four UK clients with my voice repair services; speaking & singing. All of them were unique in their own way and, nevertheless, all of them were different. However, one thing they had in common is that they were extremely smart and sharp, took directions really well and complied with the procedures, introduced to them, to a tee. This whole process, for me, was extremely heart rejuvenating, as here in Canada & in North America in general, for some reason, people who come to obtain my services are, by far, not as alert, are taking directions much slower and mainly, after the fact, not compliant with the aftermath protocol. For example: speech repair clients, for some reason, seem to be unable to understand that after they complete their voice repair course and treatment, they cannot begin to “speak without boarders”. The minute they acquire their speaking voice back, not even a ‘Russian Tank’ would be able to stop them. Understandably, they were deprived of the regular communication due to their voice issues. However, they have to understand that they have just left a “vocal rehab” in a manner of speaking, and thus cannot begin right away “binging” on their colloquial speaking. However, that, unfortunately, happened to one of my serious voice repair clients in the UK as well, who luckily, is in complete understanding of what had happened, and she also understands that, for the serious vocal anatomy problem like she has had, she would need a lot more hours of instruction, coupled with the enhanced natural treatment. That said, I will be heading out back to the UK to help her (and others) further in a few weeks. Then there was a voice repair client who used to be a singer in his country, and won numerous of competitions in his early 20s. Not being aware of any vocal technique and just possessing a natural talent, he practiced, practiced and practiced… One day, right before appearing on National Television, his voice “snapped” and he was no longer able to reach the high notes which he was famous for. He had already lined up some producers who were interested in prospering his professional career. In just seconds, his dream was shattered for the next 20 years forward. Of course, with time, he buried his frustration and disappointment, but the dream to become a well-known professional singer is still alive within him. Nevertheless, he went to numerous doctors who conducted numerous of scopes, but no one seemed to be able to help him. While with me in a session, he offered me a recent picture of his internal vocal anatomy. I was shocked, as his whole pharyngeal area was blown out of proportion on both sides! The doctor, however, commented that his vocal cords are good and his pharyngeal area is “slightly bowed”…? So in spite of the obvious health and vocal problems, the ENT specialist recommended the vocal coaching, which supposedly would help my client to restore his singing voice!!! Go figure!!! My doomed student, first and foremost, needs to work on his health and his vocal anatomy health. Those bowed, out of proportion pharyngeal glands, possessing tons of toxins within them. It is just like a ticking time bomb, which could explode at any given time and could also easily cause substantial bodily harm. As per usual, I had administered the natural herbal treatment, which plays an essential part in one’s healing. The “proof was in the pudding”. Those herbs, (which also have medicinal power) almost in an instant, set off a body reaction. My student first started to cough and then, shortly after, acquired flue like symptoms. To my dismay, he clued in momentarily to what’s going on and started exclaiming that he finally felt a movement in his throat and in his chest which he was wishing to feel for the last 20-somewhat years. To his very big credit, he understood that in order to conquer his physical and vocal problem, something like this has to happen, and he embraced it with gratitude. Way to go Man! Then I had a voice repair client who flew to me from Scotland. That was quite a sad story, as this beautiful human being acquired what is called Spasmodic Dysphonia. This very nice woman is a teacher in a public school. Nevertheless, her vocal/neurological condition prevented her from working for some time. However, obtaining five official hours (and all together six, and a bit, unofficial hours), she was able to improve conducting her voice in a more proper fashion which, in turn, had helped her to experience reduced amount of spasms. Obviously, either five or six hours could not be enough to conquer such a complicated voice disorder. Hopefully in the future, this wonderful human being will be able to pair up with me again for some much more in-depth instruction and natural treatment. And lastly, about eight month ago, when I was last in London attending to a very beautiful and promising opera singer (former voice repair client), I also momentarily had attended to another in her mid-30s woman, who at the time, due to misuse of her speaking and singing voice, had a weak, scratchy, airy and somewhat hoarse voice. She only took 2 hours of instruction in 2014. When she came to my hotel room this time, and only for an hour and fifteen minutes, I could not recognize her voice, as she sounded completely normal, clear and amplified. I have asked her if she had attended any speech lessons, or anything like this related to the voice issue, her response was that she attempted to embark on a couple of singing lessons. However, she said that she was unable to locate her teacher any further. So, if that is not a miracle, then what is? I was almost shocked to hear her speaking and as well as by her new looks (loss of weight, and overall rejuvenation)! Way to go Girl! Her determination to restore her voice and to work on her physical appearance is, indeed, the best example for any human being. That’s all for now. Let’s see what my next up-coming trip to the UK will have in store for me. I will definitely make sure to share it with my readers.
  17. What do you mean by the above, you may ask? What I mean is that the person in question, immediately after recovering their speech (or their singing voice for that matter), goes on the binge marathon. It's like a person who has been on a diet for sometime, after loosing the desirable weight, goes right back to their bad eating habits and binges on everything they were deprived of. No doubts that their lost weight will come back really fast and often double their original weight. Sad? Indeed! But that’s haw the human body works. Similarly, it happens with voice repair clients. They acquire virtually a "verbal diarrhea" And in spite of all my warnings and pleadings, they cannot stop talking until they again become raspy and hoarse! Now they are, so to speak, in their "comfort zone" but upset and frustrated that they have lost their ability to communicate with no pain or strain on their vocal anatomy, like they did during the instruction. Whose fault is that? Obviously their own. They obviously have not followed the recovery protocol, which was thoroughly and strongly advised to them. Who could they blame now? Obviously themselves. However, all of us are human and it is understandable that when we become deprived of something, we want to regain it back real fast and that's where the problem begins. We do not have patience, at least the majority of us. And those who do, we applaud! Nobody would imagine the athlete with an injured leg, (with only a few treatments behind his belt) suddenly start running a marathon! To regain the normal function of any organ, especially the limbs, spine and yes, voice, requires time and a strict regimen. In the case of the voice repair, the person requires to speak much less then before (at least for some time). They have to continuously consume the natural herbs and remedies that were suggested to them. The absolute minimum amount of hours to start the rehab to concur the voice issue would be 30 consecutive hours of unique instruction and natural treatment. For some people that is enough, and they can carry on from there on their own. For others, it requires 2 or even 3 times of repetition of the same and then maintenance - In other words, “tightening the screws” should prevail. It also depends on the severity of the vocal disorder However, the strong and determined people require less repletion and less maintenance. The more healthy and fit people usually have much less struggle with the instruction, treatment and aftermath. Those (with psychological problems and poor diet) require more attention on both parts – instruction and treatment. And, as a rule, they have many more problems during and after the process. Very often, the voice repair clients suffer from many physical and emotional problems, which also contribute to their voice loss and their voice dysfunction. So the voice problem could be a very complicated and deep matter, as the voice loss might be just a symptom of something much more serious going on with the person. Therefore, the voice issue cannot be taken lightly and should be addressed immediately, as it could be an indication of something serious yet to come, for example, a stroke or heart attack. I want my readers to understand the seriousness of any voice disorder and address it, if not medically, then alternatively, as soon as possible.
  18. I was finally able to get "The Four Pillars" and wanted to drop a few lines about it. I have not been able to perform a Full Practice/Training session yet but just by learning and training the specialized onsets while driving and performing other tasks I have greatly improved. In the lectures, Roberts enthusiasm for teaching and his desire for the students to make progress really shines through. I have no doubt that "The Four Pillars of Singing" would be of benefit to any singer, whether Novice or Professional. Thank you Robert for taking the time to put together a program that is thoughtful, knowledgeable and entertaining as well.
  19. Hi, I just wanted to introduce myself. I'm Annie. I recently bought The Four Pillars after sifting through Youtube singing videos for about a month.   I'm in a folk duo (psychedelic/prog folk)  in the San Francisco bay area.  I have only taken lessons here and there through the years and basically have no vocal technique knowledge. I feel that my vocals are ok but not exciting. I have always thought of myself more as a songwriter than singer, so haven't given as much thought to my vocals as I should have.   I want to improve, get stronger, more creative and to sound exciting and more expressive. I was inspired by what I saw/heard of Robert on Youtube.   I'm finding The Four Pillars really interesting and full of ideas and things that I've never heard of before. It's a little daunting but I'm up for the challenge.   Here's a video created several months ago of me singing Neil Young's Mr. Soul with my duo just to share where I'm at now vocally.  
  20. Indeed, should you give up, or rather do something, which will (at least) improve the quality of your life?What are those untreatable, nasty voice disorders?It definitely is vocal paralysis (paresis) or both vocal cords, the severe forms of spasmodic dysphonia, the severe forms of muscle tension dysphonia, scar tissue on the vocal cords, damaged vocal box and it’s anatomy due to/or during the surgical procedure and many more others . Once, not too long ago, in my office/studio walked in a middle-aged, pretty handsome Asian man with his wife. It was very sad to try to speak with the man, as there was nothing else coming out of his mouth but mooing. I could not understand one word he was trying to say. Then his wife took over the “conversation”. She told us a story that her husband had a cancer of thyroid. Then the doctors first were trying to get rid of the cancer, they conducted a surgical procedure, which had paralyzed one of his vocal cords (vocal paresis). Then he was suggested to undergo chemotherapy and radiation treatments, which, naturally, worsened his voice condition. He became even more raspy and hoarse and then became hardly understood.Then doctors decided to proceed with the second operation to remove the remaining cancer from his thyroid. After he came out of the second surgery, his second vocal cord was also completely paralyzed. How horrible it might be for the man in his mid-40’s to have communication difficulties, to the point that he could not form any sensible words! He came with the hope that I will offer him a magic pill and a magic cure…? On one hand, of course, you cannot blame him that he was looking for a miracle. On the other hand, how realistic is that? I have explained to him that his condition cannot be cured, either by me or anybody else for that matter. But what I could have done for him is improve the quality of his speaking; to improve clarity, annunciation and pronunciation, if not for all words, but for the majority of the words. How would I do this, you may ask? With the great difficulty, a lot of patience, huge intensity on both of our parts, employing the tedious Vocal Science ™ method and all of my 40 years experience, dealing with the health related (and other kinds) of voice/vocal disorders. I would teach him how to speak, employing facial muscles, the use of which would make his voice at least 4 times more resonant and amplified. Also, employing along with facial muscles, the abdominal muscles, would allow him to have a greater support of the sound, the proper lift of the sound off of the vocal box and thus he would become more understood, which means his confidence would be improved by far and the quality of life would be more enhanced and escalated. Unfortunately, my prospective client could not understand how he could use the different muscles (facial muscles working in full conjunction and coordination with the abdominal muscles) and not the vocal cords. Too bad for him because, as far as I am concerned, this tedious and intense, syllable-on-syllable, word-on-word Vocal Science™ technique is the only hope he had. Evidently, not all vocal severe damages are curable, but almost all of them are treatable to some degree. It requires the understanding, willingness and 'lovingness', an open heart & soul and true belief in the improvement of one’s condition. Without the above, there is no point for any of the parties involved, to embark on such, not very easy at all, endeavor. If you find this content informative and helpful, please refer to our websites for more detailed information, or give Diana Yampolsky a call for a free consultation on any of the vocal problems you, or your loved one(s) might have. 416-857-8741 www.vocalscience.com www.repairyourvoice.com
  21. Hey Singers, I am a singer from Germany and use the program Four Pillars of Singing for about a year and would like times as much present this course is just my vocal abilities will improve you. I want to thank Robert Lunte for it, I, he has so much heart and soul incorporated in this course. I am pleased with the results and you can use the Four Pillars highly recommend. There is no better person for Vocal me square in the world. Vocally I have improved significantly, and the feedback I get is really incredible. Thank you Robert for this great vocal courses. I like your kind under handed, a really good teacher and a great person you are. *** German ***​ Ich bin ein Sänger aus Deutschland und verwenden Sie das Programm Four Pillars of Singing seit etwa einem Jahr und möchte mal so stark legen Sie diese natürlich hat einfach meine stimmlichen Fähigkeiten Ihnen verbessert wird. Ich möchte Robert Lunte danken für es, ich, er hat so viel Herz und Seele in diesem Kurs eingearbeitet. Ich freue mich über die Ergebnisse und können Sie das Four Pillars nur wärmstens empfehlen. Es gibt keine bessere für mich persönlich Vocal Platz der Welt. Gesanglich I haben sich deutlich verbessert und das Feedback, das ich bekommen, ist wirklich unglaublich. Danke Robert für diese großen Vokal Kurse. Ich mag deine Art unter handed, ein wirklich guter Lehrer und ein großartiger Mensch du bist. Patrick Steel
  22. I need some ideas why this vocals dont sound musical especially on hi notes, its me singing i think when i hit hi notes it sucks, is ther some vocal coach that can give me some advice i'm a bit lost here is the audio sample 
  23. So what does a student need? They need to be able to do all of the physical tasks that constitute the singing activity required by their goals. This requires training, even if no trainer is available. In addition, their goals will require them to develop the musicianship and experience to handle styles, inflection, and ornamentation appropriate for the music they want to do. This requires learning, even if no teacher is available. In school and at home, we were told many times to "Think about what you are doing!" That approach is almost completely counter-productive for musicians and high wire walkers. Imagine the effect of yelling "Think about what you're doing!" to a person walking a wire across the Grand Canyon. The free-flow execution of skills is managed by a part of the brain that is totally different from the part of the brain where knowledge and understanding are applied to currently executing skills. Once a performer starts thinking about what they are doing, the analytical part of the brain begins to interfere with the free-flow part of the brain. If you as a teacher explain everything, you are implying that singing skills can be managed by the intellect, which is actually impossible beyond a beginner level. I'm not saying that teaching about the subject of singing technique has no value. A voice teacher needs to really know and understand the subject. However, I am suggesting that you carefully consider how much and when to teach a student "about" singing technique. My friend, Robert Lunte, says that singers need to train as "vocal athletes," and I totally agree. The great athletes don't become great by approaching their skills analytically. Their trainers focus on the physical and mental demands of specific skills, and they train the muscles to do the job. The great trainers also train the athlete's mind to concentrate in ways that don't interfere with the fluency of their physical skills. Princeton says that "training refers to the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and competencies as a result of the teaching of vocational or practical skills and knowledge that relate to specific useful competencies." I like that definition, but I would boil it down a bit and say that personal voice training is leading someone through exercises and experiences that develop the skills to achieve specific goals and acquire the knowledge required to execute those skills in the required styles. For more information about The Performing Mind, go to http://www.pfco.com. Michael Kysar The Performing Mind http://www.pfco.com
  24. So what does a student need? They need to be able to do all of the physical tasks that constitute the singing activity required by their goals. This requires training, even if no trainer is available. In addition, their goals will require them to develop the musicianship and experience to handle styles, inflection, and ornamentation appropriate for the music they want to do. This requires learning, even if no teacher is available. In school and at home, we were told many times to "Think about what you are doing!" That approach is almost completely counter-productive for musicians and high wire walkers. Imagine the effect of yelling "Think about what you're doing!" to a person walking a wire across the Grand Canyon. The free-flow execution of skills is managed by a part of the brain that is totally different from the part of the brain where knowledge and understanding are applied to currently executing skills. Once a performer starts thinking about what they are doing, the analytical part of the brain begins to interfere with the free-flow part of the brain. If you as a teacher explain everything, you are implying that singing skills can be managed by the intellect, which is actually impossible beyond a beginner level. I'm not saying that teaching about the subject of singing technique has no value. A voice teacher needs to really know and understand the subject. However, I am suggesting that you carefully consider how much and when to teach a student "about" singing technique. My friend, Robert Lunte, says that singers need to train as "vocal athletes," and I totally agree. The great athletes don't become great by approaching their skills analytically. Their trainers focus on the physical and mental demands of specific skills, and they train the muscles to do the job. The great trainers also train the athlete's mind to concentrate in ways that don't interfere with the fluency of their physical skills. Princeton says that "training refers to the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and competencies as a result of the teaching of vocational or practical skills and knowledge that relate to specific useful competencies." I like that definition, but I would boil it down a bit and say that personal voice training is leading someone through exercises and experiences that develop the skills to achieve specific goals and acquire the knowledge required to execute those skills in the required styles. For more information about The Performing Mind, go to http://www.pfco.com. Michael Kysar The Performing Mind http://www.pfco.com View full articles
  25. Which Is The Best Vocal "Method"to Study? A unique look at the approaches, challenges and insights of being a singing teacher. Advice from Vocal Coach Kathy Thompson © 2009 Request permission to use in whole or in part by email: admin@purevoicepower.ca We study singing to get better at it just as we would study any skill. We are studying this art form in order to improve our ability. One of the foundations of voice work lies in building confidence. But more than that, we should study singing in order to acquire healthy technique when we vocalize. Notice that I said healthy rather than good. I try to avoid words such as good or bad, because they imply judgment. When you sing with correct and healthy technique, you are in fact maintaining your voice for longevity and stamina, as well as optimum performance. Good technique involves understanding your instrument to some degree, and employing recommended, safe habits when it comes to warming up or working out with your voice. Beyond that, continued study and vocal maintenance (regular practice routine) is recommended. Regardless of my teaching methods, there are constants and truths such as: Progress does not - and will not - happen instantly, overnight. As with developing any physical skill, developing one's voice takes time without force. If you practice regularly, you will see results. Everyone progresses at a different rate. In order to create something artistic, it helps to know the rules. That's the same with anything you want to excel at in life! We shouldn't assume that just because you know how to use your voice to talk and have sung songs, that you know all there is to know about how to do it better. Think of it this way: Just because you know how to run doesn't mean that you can automatically run a marathon. Just because you can use a sewing machine doesn't mean you can sew high fashion clothing. Just because you can talk with your voice doesn't mean you can sing expertly. Just because you can sing without studying doesn't mean you have the ability to sing like a seasoned professional with heavy usage demands on one's voice. I think we can agree that someone just learning to paint can paint any old picture without knowing what they're doing or studying it. Maybe they will get lucky and it will look fine. But it's usually short-lived. Pretty soon that passionate novice painter will want to know how it all works. So they study. Great painters know all about painting and understand how the great masters created such classic, unique and timeless art. I think it's the same with singing. What is a method? My dictionary defines METHOD as: A manner of procedure, esp. a systematic or clearly defined way of accomplishing an end; system or order in thought or action; the plan of procedure characteristic of discipline; logical or scientific arrangement. A method is the way in which we do something. Most everything we do has a method of some kind. You might have your own method of stacking the dishwasher or your own method of folding your towels. Use of a method simply implies that there is a systematic or specific way of doing something. If a singing teacher advertises that they are certified in a particular method of teaching singing, it's possible that they will be only able to deploy only that one method when teaching voice. They may not be allowed to utilize any aids, exercises or approaches that they as a singing teacher created themselves. I prefer not to work like that. To just use one method created by someone else would be stifling to me, no matter how popular that method is, or which masterful teacher developed it. I am the sum of my parts. All of my experiences as a singing student, actor, voice over artist and vocalist made me the performer I am today, and also the teacher I am today. I have studied voice with many singing teachers myself, taken workshops, and I was a voice major in college. I have experienced various styles of teaching voice as a singing student myself. I have developed my own approaches on how to connect with students as individuals over the years and I customize lessons to the way in which a student will learn best. (BTW- I myself, will continue to learn, read, research, develop, take workshops and classes for the rest of my life. We are never above learning anything new.) Which Teaching Methods does Kathy use? I believe that there are so many different approaches to teaching voice because there is no standard. That is a lengthy discussion which is best had elsewhere. When I teach voice, I use mostly my own “method”. That means I use partial things from a variety of other methods, or systems of teaching voice, along with exercises, games and handouts that I created. I draw from information from all forms of media, and my own personal experience as a singer. I would work differently with someone who is very soft-spoken and shy than I would with someone who is a high-energy extrovert. There are different kinds of learners and I take that into account. I never plagiarize anything from other singing teachers. I might take a seed of an idea I learned and tweak it, just as you would a classic food recipe. If I learn something related to singing from a science book, I will incorporate that. If I use a scale from another method such as the Seth Riggs SLS method, Frank Sinatra method, the Alan Greene workbook, or the Bel Canto method, I am sure to tell the student where that exercise came from and that they can pull on those resources. (The source is always quoted on their printed handout). I frequently tell my students about other singing courses! If a student is doing something incorrect during singing, I can imitate it in my own voice, identify where the error is occurring during the process, and then show the student how to approach singing that one thing with more correct technique or more economical way. Kathy's Approach I insist on visiting the basics at first and spend time accordingly on the usual things such as correct breathing, posture, vowel formation, etc. It's ongoing. I devote a part of every lesson to performance. I want you to be an original. I want to help you discover the leader within you. Every moment that we are singing a song, we are making decisions about how to sing it. The lyrics will mean something. The beat will mean something. How you phrase, deliver words, the volume or power you apply will shape the song. The vocal nuance or the boldness you choose will come into play. I think there is an actor in each of us and we can adopt characters for our songs. How you connect with your audience whether live on stage, or from a recording booth - will matter in the end. The main goal of lessons is not to CHANGE the inherent way your voice sounds. My goal is to take the unique sound of your voice and add to it; enhance it. We work towards uncovering and empowering the artist within you. We develop the voice you have and build upon that with a spirit of joy. You will discover new sounds. You can't force your voice to grow or do things it can't possibly do until you have trained to do it. (And yes, there is a difference between belting and yelling!) To me, singing is both science and art at the same time. I never try to change someone's natural sound. We only enhance it, help it flourish, take a holistic vocal evolutionary path and keep adding new musical layers. At the end of every lesson, I hope that these 4 questions will be answered yes: 1. Did your voice get some good exercise / workout? 2. Did you learn something interesting and new? 3. Do you understand the assignment for next time; are there any questions? 4. Do you feel motivated to sing and practice? I research. I test. In truth, science is still learning about human behaviour and how the brain works, which is paramount to the mind-body connection not only when it comes to singing or playing an instrument, but is related to learning and executing ANY physical skill. Science is still learning about the voice. What Makes a Great Singing Teacher? Let us pose this question to anyone who teaches a skill. For example: In order to be a fantastic football coach, does that person have to be a fantastic football player themselves first? In order to be a fantastic auto mechanic teacher, does that person have to be a fantastic auto mechanic themselves first? In order to be a fantastic singing teacher, does that person have to be a fantastic singer themselves? It's my opinion that the answer to that is yes. Ideally, at some time in their career the teacher, trainer or coach would have excelled at performing that skill themselves, which they are now teaching. If they themselves know what it's like to hit a home run on stage or in the studio, they can bring that experience to you through their coaching. Don't be too quick to judge the style of your singing teacher. If you are a raspy rock singer and you need to learn how to sing more healthy easy sounds during practice, you might not want to study with a person who only knows how to rock hard with their voice. You probably need warmer, richer, healthier exercises to sing; not more of the same. You need a little something in the way of therapeutic singing. Look to a variety of styles to study: R&B, folk/roots, classical, SLS, theatre, pop, etc. Internet Misinformation About Singing Methods There is so much misinformation on the internet, it's hard to believe what's true and what's not! Just because something is in writing doesn't mean that it is entirely accurate and absolute. There are literally hundreds of people out there calling themselves singing teachers, vocal coaches, starting schools and calling themselves experts. Should a singing teacher have academic credentials only? A degree? Stage experience only? What credentials does someone need to be a valid singing teacher? Suppose someone has performed on Broadway stages for years but has never been in a hit musical, is not famous, and they decide to teach singing. Does that mean they won't be a good singing teacher? Maybe maybe not. Don't be fooled by fame. Fame can be a result of luck and good networking skills. It's rare that anyone becomes famous by accident, including singing teachers. They have usually sought their station. That's not good, bad, right, or wrong just fact. A few times, a parent has asked me if I have taught anyone famous. Would that make a difference to the quality of my teaching? Not necessarily. Keep an open mind is all I'm saying and try not to think in absolutes. There are singing methods out there with certified coaches who are fanatical with the notion that they have the ONLY and the BEST method of teaching singing on the planet. Some attach to celebrity endorsement. Well there can be many, many amazing and valid approaches to working with people on their voices. I think that some popular methods are far too technical and the student gets hung up on the mechanics of singing. Some methods recommend things like warming up with very high quiet tones, or never talk about vocal mechanics, and assorted approaches. Here’s something that made my eyes pop wide open. I saw video of a celebrity voice coach working with a famous rap superstar that I found to be very disturbing. He had his female rap star actually moving her jaw sideways, quickly sweeping it back and forth, fast and hard, as a part of the vocal warm-up! You can almost guarantee TMJ medical issues from that. In fact, it could possibly warrant litigation. This NY singing coach was charging an astronomical hourly fee into three figures (but included back massage). I like to base things in fact. I have kept a log of internet untruths about singing. Here is just one of many, and more benign than most: There is a website I saw which has the word musician and university in the name of the site. Under singing, it says, Singing is easy. Anyone can do it. But what most singers do not know is that your voice is just like an instrument. I don't think that's true. No, singing is not easy for everyone. Some people are very challenged with vocally interpreting and recreating sound as they hear it (* research the word amusia), and require different amounts of, and approaches to- ear training for accurate pitch placement. Some people are in poor physical condition and have a hard time understanding breathing, believe it or not. Some people were raised in a culture where silence was encouraged and they are ashamed to use their voice in a singing fashion. And so forth. The human voice is the only musical instrument located within the body. It is prejudiced with emotion. A piano is not. A violin has no emotion. A guitar has no emotion. It's the players of these instruments who can bring emotional interpretation to sound production. But our voice is within our body; the player and the instrument are one. Furthermore, I can see all other instruments as I play them. But you cannot see your voice as you play it. You feel it. You operate this instrument of voice as your brain sends neuromuscular impulses to your voice and various other muscles and systems in the body. For fascinating information on this, I encourage you to investigate The Alexander Technique for Singers. (FYI, it's a little technical.) I don't mean to scare or intimidate anyone. Connect with the person you want to work with. See if they make sense to you. Use your instincts and common sense when it comes to information at large. If something sounds astonishing or weird, perhaps try searching university and academic websites which are usually loaded with true and verified information. When we sing, let there be unconditional joy. Kathy Thompson, Vocal Coach, Toronto