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Found 14 results

  1. Weird head voice?

    Hello everyone, So I've been to a couple of singing lessons and finally confirmed that I've accessed my head voice. Problem is that it sounds weird. Check this out and this out. Let me know what you guys think.
  2. Wade In The Water (Smule)

    https://www.smule.com/recording/eva-cassidy-wade-in-the-water/830708093_1214803719
  3. Hi everyone, new member here. I am a female singer who has been diagnosed with a severe underbite and TMJ with neck stiffness. This diagnosis has been pretty devastating to my confidence, given that I am not a trained singer and have only been doing this for about 3 years (I'm 20). I have recorded quite a bit of music, mostly originals in the style of punk rock, and I can't help but think that my severe underbite coupled with the loud style of singing that I have grown accustomed to is to blame for my TMJ. At the moment, I am seeking treatment to correct my bite via jaw surgery, but it will not be completely fixed for another year to 2 years. Until then, I need some tips on how to overcome this problem so that I can start gigging live and avoid the pain/burning sensation that I get when I sing. Has anyone had a similar experience?
  4. Vocal Rest Questions

    Would it be better for my voice to rest today? or to exercise today? I fell asleep on the bus, going home from school, and somebody woke me up. What do you do if you're tired? Do you practice, or do you take a day off?
  5. Step 1. · Identify the vocal problem itself in order to get your voice back. Perhaps, you have noticed that your voice (Speaking and/or singing) is not working in the same capacity as it once was. Obviously you are puzzled and concerned. At this point, you have to come to terms that something is not the same and begin to accept that fact. Step 2. · Identify the cause of such occurrence. Please try to analyze what could have caused your voice problem in the first place. Please try to “rewind” all the possible facts, which could have lead to such an ordeal. You might think of any medical/surgical procedures you might have undergone in the not very distant past. You might think of a ball game you might have attended with your kids, or a concert of your Idol singing. In this instance, you would possibly be able to recall how excited you were then, during the events, & how loud you were cheering for the performers in the field. Also, it probably would not hurt to look at your personal relationship with your spouse and your children. Have you been shouting a lot lately? Have you, perhaps, been under a lot of stress at work and/or at home? All of the above factors (and many others) could easily aid to a voice problem. When you are in the moment, you are not paying attention how loud you speak or scream. The consequences will haunt you later. Step 3. · Do not ‘sugarcoat’ your feelings; rather, embrace it with a grain of sault. That alone will help you immensely to get your voice back in a fast and efficient manner. When you start experiencing some changes in your voice, please DO NOT pretend that nothing happened and do not convince yourself that it is just temporary and you will feel better tomorrow. Unfortunately, you might not feel better tomorrow, as the damage has already been done and it will not go away on its own. It might require some further investigation and medical (or alternative) assistance. Step 4. · Outline your goal for the best possible recovery of your vocal problem and enjoy getting there. Once you are able to face the fact that you do have a vocal problem, please embrace this fact and outline the goal to get your voice back. It might, not necessarily, be an easy road, but please try to enjoy the process towards achieving your main goal – getting your voice back.
  6. Step 1. · Identify the vocal problem itself in order to get your voice back. Perhaps, you have noticed that your voice (Speaking and/or singing) is not working in the same capacity as it once was. Obviously you are puzzled and concerned. At this point, you have to come to terms that something is not the same and begin to accept that fact. Step 1. · Identify the vocal problem itself in order to get your voice back. Perhaps, you have noticed that your voice (Speaking and/or singing) is not working in the same capacity as it once was. Obviously you are puzzled and concerned. At this point, you have to come to terms that something is not the same and begin to accept that fact. Step 2. · Identify the cause of such occurrence. Please try to analyze what could have caused your voice problem in the first place. Please try to “rewind” all the possible facts, which could have lead to such an ordeal. You might think of any medical/surgical procedures you might have undergone in the not very distant past. You might think of a ball game you might have attended with your kids, or a concert of your Idol singing. In this instance, you would possibly be able to recall how excited you were then, during the events, & how loud you were cheering for the performers in the field. Also, it probably would not hurt to look at your personal relationship with your spouse and your children. Have you been shouting a lot lately? Have you, perhaps, been under a lot of stress at work and/or at home? All of the above factors (and many others) could easily aid to a voice problem. When you are in the moment, you are not paying attention how loud you speak or scream. The consequences will haunt you later. Step 3. · Do not ‘sugarcoat’ your feelings; rather, embrace it with a grain of sault. That alone will help you immensely to get your voice back in a fast and efficient manner. When you start experiencing some changes in your voice, please DO NOT pretend that nothing happened and do not convince yourself that it is just temporary and you will feel better tomorrow. Unfortunately, you might not feel better tomorrow, as the damage has already been done and it will not go away on its own. It might require some further investigation and medical (or alternative) assistance. Step 4. · Outline your goal for the best possible recovery of your vocal problem and enjoy getting there. Once you are able to face the fact that you do have a vocal problem, please embrace this fact and outline the goal to get your voice back. It might, not necessarily, be an easy road, but please try to enjoy the process towards achieving your main goal – getting your voice back. View full articles
  7. In Vocal Science Uk ,Our voice repair specialist give you treatment ,without any surgery . visit us or call to cure you all voice realted problem. Call us at - 416-857-8741 Mail us at- info@vocalscience.com
  8. Ms. Yampolsky's coaching concentrates not just on the voice, but on the performer as a whole. Her approach can boost stage confidence by improving the voice's range, pitch and power. She believes that a singer has 25% natural talent, while 75% of a singer's performance relies on technical training. Her special exercises enable the singer to meet any combinations of pitch and duration of sound. Ms. Yampolsky views the body as an instrument whose quality of well being determines the quality of sound produced and recognizes that the voice is a reflection of the 'inner self.' All courses are customized to the unique needs of each individual singer and program the brain using visualization and vocal repetition. The Vocal Science (TM) Method alleviates strain on vocal cords and develops proper use of facial and abdominal muscles while stressing posture.
  9. Feeling good

    I discover my singing which have lots of flaws including phasing problem, some words are flat. Actually i rarely speak eng. with my friend s and just want to know, u guys can get what I sing??? I have changed few melodies and the mood of the song, is that a bit strange or over?? I dun mind any cristism of my performance, just be curious of western ppl opinions. Thx!!!
  10. Hi guys! I'm Rodrigo again. I hadn't been training due  flu I had and now I started again. As you may guess, I'm a begginer and I have tons of ideas and questions. This one is really cool, and you will see why. I found out that the FBR is awesome but it has tons of information and for the part-time musician, it is critical to know what to practice in order to make more productive sessions. I've been playing gutiar for 15 years now, and also I play a lot of styles (classical, rock, acoustic, percusive, etc) and the key to progress and still have fun is to have goals. I mean, personal, realistic and short-terms goals that you can acomplish in a few weeks or months and then move on to another thing. Set a new goal, and keep moving. Now that I'm into singing, I can have practice sessions for 45 min 5 to 7 times a week. Some of them even until 1 hour. So I was doing this things to get better in things that I need to get better now. I do this: ---Resonant tracking 1 T&T Slow then Fast 2 T&R the same way and 3 R&R only fast ---Support training: Robert's excercises and a few more that I've been doing since I took classical lessons, more focused to feeling the awearness of the support process ( really easy ones, but gives awesome results) ---Onsets Well there is a lot here in the book. I have to get more compression, and I tend to sing with a lot of dark overtones amplified. And an excess of these does not sound well for me. What do I do? The following: Q&R since F3 to F3 (Sometimes G4 or A4, if I can do them without push, pain or constrictions) and I repeat 2 times that onset in every note, except for Db4 to E4, when I repeat 4 times the onset. I do this because my bridge is around those notes. And Robert says we have to practice those notes harder because those are the difficult ones (and I is so true!). Then I follow with a few attemps of A&R. If it is too hard for me, I don't do it. I listen to my body. After that, I do edging onsets in the same range, maybe 2 times per note. Sometimes 3. ---Sirens Well, not too much to say here. I do melodic 5th as Robert show us. Two times, at least, focusing on Q&R onset and some of T&R. I don't go too high, at least not for now. I hope my way to train this can inspire you to think and organize your practice schedule if you're not doing it now. For the most advanced TVS people... how do you practice the FBR? Do you think I'm doing it right? Rock-on!
  11. Hello everyone. I'm not all that good at introductions but I been singing for a while without any type of training other then mimicing my influences until i ran across KTVA. i started to train ken's method for about 2 years. my voice grew but i couldn't bridge my voices to save my life. i always had Mr. Lunte's program in mind but money and determination to breakthrough with KTVA kept me from purchasing it. I finally picked up pillars and so far i love it..Mr. Lunte is great and easy to connect with. i was emailing him for a while until he advised i post on the forum so everyone else can chime in. bridging is still an issue for me. when it comes to resonant tracking i feel i get the buzzing and if i try to keep it thru my break my voice just craps out.. if i lighten it i can get thru but i lose a lot of buzz. i have some samples of me doing octave sirens. i recorded these today. i got all the way up to f4. after that i felt like i was pushing so i stopped. I'm willing to bet I'm carrying to much weight up. http://picosong.com/uz3J/ I'm going to have to set up a sound cloud account..but i used this for now
  12. More and more, we are hearing about well-known artists losing their voices, cancelling their shows and tours and undergoing vocal surgeries. Nevertheless, the amateur singers lose their voices in an everyday basis as well, we just don’t hear about it as much. And lastly speakers: They are caught completely by surprise when their speaking voice seizes on them “out of the blue” or, at least, they think so. In reality, the voice loss is always premeditated. The worse it is for speakers, as they’re completely not expecting anything like that and the lost voice is getting them, the least to say, in shock. The fact is that they do not realize that the voice is a vulnerable organ and could break very easily. Singers are, by far, more aware about it and those who proceed with caution, so to speak, are able to keep their voice healthy and lengthy for the rest of their lives. So what about those who don’t know about voice preservation? We have the answer for them. The Vocal Science technique, which we advocate, suggests you to use the different set of muscles (which are your facial muscles), instead of the vocal box muscles. The facial muscles contain the sinus (vocal) cavities within. That is where the voice (as a muscle) with the support of the abdominal muscles will get in and get secured within those cavities. Then with the proper breathing control, (also supported by the abdominal muscles), the sound gets projected to its aimed destination. So, at that point, the mission is accomplished, as the wholesome mechanism, which allows the voice to work in its fullest capacity possible and with no pain or strain on the vocal anatomy, has been instilled in the human muscles and psyche.
  13. Hi guys! It's been a while since the last time I wrote here. I'm NOT proud to admit that I didn't practice regulary for the past months so I didn't get any results, but I was able to identify some aspects I need to improve right now. Mi BIGGEST problem is the lack of strenght and coordination to achieve a good vocal fold compression. My voice sounds too weak with a lot of air comming out. I know the KEY onset is the Q&R, and I practice everytime I do my routine. Then, I try to singerzise - "quacking like a duck" and by using the words "Nyat" and "Yeah". The other onset I think I could add to my routine for now is the "Pulse&Release". Now, I'm into some soft acoustic songs and I can listen that light mass phonations sound great. Am I right? Also, will the P&R help me with my vocal fold compression? I'm not in a hurry. I'll train and wait with patience until I have enough control of my glottis before I try anything else. Thoughts? Thank you in advance guys, I'll try to be more involved in the formum from now on.
  14. I was finally able to get "The Four Pillars" and wanted to drop a few lines about it. I have not been able to perform a Full Practice/Training session yet but just by learning and training the specialized onsets while driving and performing other tasks I have greatly improved. In the lectures, Roberts enthusiasm for teaching and his desire for the students to make progress really shines through. I have no doubt that "The Four Pillars of Singing" would be of benefit to any singer, whether Novice or Professional. Thank you Robert for taking the time to put together a program that is thoughtful, knowledgeable and entertaining as well.