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Found 162 results

  1. Hello, my 10 year old daughter is an aspiring singer. She is in voice lessons and has been in some musical theater productions as well. Any thoughts or suggestions for improvements are welcomed to help her with her goal of becoming a singer one day. We understand she is not necessarily a "natural", but she does have the drive and desire and truly loves performing. She has been sung the National Anthem at a couple sports events. I am also including a link for one of her auditions. Thank you in advance! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=euqTerUAKvY (National Anthem) https://youtu.be/h8FUMp4dCwU (excerpt from "Born to Entertain")
  2. MAESTRO DAVID KYLE THE WINDOW OF FAME Vocal teacher for all styles for over 50 years, David Kyle, The “Maestro” became a local Seattle icon and was considered by the industry to be one of the best vocal instructors for contemporary singers in the world. Unique to the “Maestro’s” approach was his method for expanding vocal range into multiple “registers”, or what we would refer to today at TVS as, "Bridging & Connecting". Maestro was also keen on eliminating psychological barriers that hinder singers’ freedom of expression, by use of creative visualization techniques and development of healthy auditory imagery for singing. One day, Nate Burch, one of my students from Seattle, came to the lesson with an old coffee stained piece of paper that had a hand written, transcribed lecture from Maestro Kyle on it. An excerpt from that lecture is shared below as well as popular quotes that Maestro Kyle used to use with all his students. Maestro David Kyle & Robert Lunte - The Vocalist Studio MAESTRO DAVID P. KYLE LECTURE: Those sounds which seem to ring the most are usually the best. Those which seem the roundest are usually the best. Those which seem to resonate are usually the best. Those which seem to echo are usually the best. So listen out into the theater and see if they are echoing, and if they are round, and they are resonant. Connect your notes and don’t be afraid. There are two kinds of stars. There are “stars” and there are “superstars.” The star no matter how he tries he just can’t seem to become a superstar. He’s great, great, great, great, but along comes a Caruso, or a Lanza, or a Gigli, and he can’t quite get over the hurdle. It’s because of one simple thing. The star sings, and when he’s singing he listens to himself; and while he’s listening he shapes it; and he opinionates it; and he shapes it around. If it isn’t round enough he rounds it more. And that sounds logical doesn’t it? It’s wrong! The superstar pictures the sound and knows what he wants to hear before he makes it! Singing is more the concept than anything. If we’ve got the right idea, then the muscles as they train more and more they become like a reflex and the reflexes respond to the image. Even if you’re trained beautifully and your image is a fear that you haven’t got high notes and it’ll never get there the reflexes won’t respond no matter how well trained you are. The epitome of it is you can say singing is absolutely mental. In the process of getting to realize that you have to take a lot of physical steps before you begin to see it, but it is true! The singer has to be in the consciousness and the mood. How does one establish a consciousness and a mood? You tend to become as you act. So if you pretend and try to get your feelings to act as you think they would act if you were doing it, then you’re getting in the consciousness. But if our consciousness is only on body and physical things then our mind is... The rest of the lecture offers another 5 pages of incredible insights about how the mind controls the singing voice. Read the entire lecture in The Four Pillars of Singing. Maestro David Kyle - The Vocalist Studio Maestro David Kyle Quotes “Good singers sing and listen, Great singers listen, then sing” “Good speech is half sung, but good singing is not half spoken.” “Wear the world like a loose garment. Don’t let it tighten in on you.” “Suppose you were learning to drive a car. Would it be better to learn on a road with no obstructions?” “Every negation is a blessing in disguise.” “The art of the art is the art that conceals the art.” “He who would know aught of art must first learn and then take his ease.” “When you open up you should be able to see light from both ends.” “Feel like you are singing with your whole body.” “Your reflexes respond to your image.” “The reflexes respond to the imagination.” “Listen away from yourself.” “Sing on the balls of your feet, like the American Indian.” “Burn Bridges and don’t look back.” “Listen away from yourself, right out into the auditorium.” “Singing is both a science and an art. All art is all imagination and you cannot fix that.” “You have to believe you will receive before you receive and then you will get it.” “Visualize you are already what you want to be. Act as if you are that, and you will become it.” “If you always notice what you are while trying to get there, you’ll never get there.” “Start as if the sound begins before the breath.” “The end is in the beginning, and the beginning is in the end.” “It’s not a game I’m playing! If you think that you’re short changing yourself.” “People don’t get tired of their work; they get tired of the resistance to their work.” “Forever diet the voice. Diet the voice; diet the mind; diet the spirit; diet everything but your income!” “Feel like your whole self is all a part of the sound, like the full violin is just vibrating.” “Imagine the sound you want, picture the sound you want.” “Open up the entire body and see the light through both ends!” “Breath, pause, release the jaw, visualize the sound you want, and sing to the back of (Carnegie Hall).” “We don’t let attitudes control us, we control them!” “Only babies are victims of moods!” “Let the sound flow right over the roof of the mouth into the masque.” “Bowels up, vowels forward.” “Some day you’re going to stand up and say, ‘This is me’ and go!” “We tend to become as we act.” “Attitude is everything in everything.” “Every time you find your thinking going to the strain or the resistance, immediately create mentally the sound that you want, hear what you want.” “And remember you have a beautiful voice. At your worst you sound better than many of them at their best!” “Just don’t sound like everyone else!” “And tell it your singing marvelous, you’re singing wonderfully!” “Sing Away from yourself, to something.” “Listen, then sing!” “Way to go Baby!” Maestro David Kyle passed on Saturday, November 27th of 2004 OTHER VOICE COACHES OF ROBERT LUNTE...
  3. Vocal Athlete Intensive Seattle, WA USA - May 14th - 18th Five (5) Day Vocal Intensive to ACHIEVE YOUR VOCAL POTENTIAL with Robert Lunte & Draven Grey.RESULTS: Take ownership of your voice with hands-on, results-driven coaching. You will learn the top tested exercises and get the feedback for doing them correctly.CONFIDENCE: Get behind the mic knowing exactly what to do and how to do it. Sing with confidence from a solid vocal foundation with a performance that is uniquely you.MASTERY: Achieve your vocal potential. With a proven pedagogy for modern singing, we will show you the way out of vocal frustration into mastery.Study with Robert Lunte, Founder of The Vocalist Studio, author of critically acclaimed vocal training system The Four Pillars of Singing and internationally recognized voice training school for hundreds of voice coaches. Draven Grey is an accomplished musician, vocalist, rock singing teacher and music industry expert. He has coached bands across the world in their careers, released multiple books and course on the music industry. www.VocalAthleteIntensive.com ******************* Be sure to check out the Facebook Event and show your interest: https://www.facebook.com/events/158276921614589/ *******************
  4. Robert Lunte & RØDE Microphones present four weeks of vocal training in Germany, Italy and France. April, 2018. For information click the links below or reach out to the people tagged in this post. See you in April! TVS Events Page http://bit.ly/TVSEvents Download The Tour Poster HERE: http://bit.ly/TVSMCTourSpring2018 14-15 APR Ansbach, Germany http://bit.ly/TVSMCAnsbachGermany 21-22 APR Pescara, Italy http://bit.ly/TVSMCPescaraItaly 28-29 APR Cagliari, Italy http://bit.ly/TVSMCCagliariItaly 1-2 MAY Nimes, France http://bit.ly/TVSMCNimesFrance If you have any questions about the event or private lessons, contact me on my personal email or here at TMV World. I look forward to helping you with your singing. You will get results, guaranteed.
  5. I'm unaware if this video has been posted here before. I think it underscores what's wrong with some vocal coaches who seem to remain stuck in outdated teaching methods from circa 1985. I would have come away from my first voice lesson with the exact same opinion were it not for the fact that a major rock star told me his coach increased his vocal range, stamina, and power significantly! I went to his same vocal coach. I went to the first lesson expecting that whatever the coach instructed was gold, and I was going to follow it blindly! After all, I had seen the results in a singer he taught! It's true, just like Grohl implies in this video, after that first lesson I thought, "it just seems bogus that these singing scales are gonna help me achieve what I'm wanting vocally!" There was very little in depth discussion about what the science of the vocal instruction was. It was just, take this cassette home of the scales I just recorded you singing, and practice them every day for at least an hour. Next week when you come back, we're gonna work on vibrato. Then the next lesson, another cassette, until a large volume of dollars drained out of my wallet. It's very cool how Rob Lunte blazed the trail on vocal pedagogy in the last 15+ years. It's a model that brings a more holistic and specialized comprehension, which translates into augmentation of vocal development/improvement. To say nothing of his engaging training system, and the re-engineering of "singing scales" or "vocal workouts" (chiefly - onsets) to maximize the students ability to feel more tangibly what is occurring in the vocal track, and why. I don't know who this coach was that Cobain went to, but you can see there wasn't enough understanding at the end of his lesson. AND, if Kurt blew his voice out, why did he come home with a cassette of scales? (see any of the youtube videos or threads on exercises for vocal damage). peace! k
  6. hannahgrace55

    Warm Ups for New Singers!

    I am working with a new voice student. She has been a piccolo and flute 8+ years. I am trying to find some effective warm-ups for her. She is able to match pitch and has more confidence singing in her lower range. She has been recently singing with a very pressed sound and is very tense when beginning warm-ups. Trying to find warm-ups to help combat these things!
  7. How do you correct a vocal fault (that could be potentially harmful) when the student can’t comprehend what you’re telling them to do to change how they are singing?
  8. Robert Lunte from The Vocalist Studio provides an overview of the significance of the Bernoulli effect in singing and how understanding this principle, can help you to train more efficiently and gain more progress as a singer. This excerpt is from the 2nd webinar with Draven Grey.
  9. Robert Lunte from The Vocalist Studio provides an overview of the significance of the Bernoulli effect in singing and how understanding this principle, can help you to train more efficiently and gain more progress as a singer. This excerpt is from the 2nd webinar with Draven Grey. View full articles
  10. As I've mentioned in other posts, I've been taking lessons for a few months with an opera/musical theater singer, and I've played a whole lot of different singers I enjoy for her to hear her opinion, and I find it interesting to hear the impressions of someone from a different world and different sensibilities. I thought I'd compile all the ones I remember into a collection because I was also curious to hear reactions: Chris Cornell: Disliked. "He's just screaming in the one part. And his high notes are very thin, but he puts all the scream and effect on it. If you heard it without that stuff it would just be a very weak sound." Bruce Dickinson(Iron Maiden): Disliked. "Sound is thin, poor technique on higher notes, badly produced vibrato." Dio: Unimpressed. "Again, just a thin tenor putting some effect on his voice." Warrel Dane(Nevermore): Liked. "Good control. He's making a choice on every note." Eric Adams(Manowar): "One of the best sounds of all the singers you've played for me. But still a thinner tenor voice." Mike Patton: Liked. "Nice voice, clearly knows how to sing. But I wish I could hear his natural sound more instead of all this 'put on' stuff he does." Tarja Turunen and Marco Hietala(Nightwish): "You can hear both these people know how to sing correctly, they're just doing some weird things because that's the style I guess. Forcing the straight tones is making her sound flat, and she knows that, but she still does it." Devin Townsend: "If I were his ENT doctor, I'd love him, because of all the money I'd make form all the damage he's doing. He has to be on steroids to be doing what he does consistently. Either that or he's just a freak." Eric Clayton (Savior Machine): "Completely different from the other stuff you've shown me. Sounds like a regular baritone stage voice." Daniel Heiman (Lost Horizon): "Not bad. He's doing some of that weird stuff again, but he sounds good otherwise." Alissa White-Gluz (Arch Enemy): "Oh God, that's a woman!? I can't listen, it's too painful, she's ripping her vocal chords to shreds." Phil Anselmo (Pantera): "I guess it's...kind of like singing." Tim "Ripper" Owens (Judas Priest, Iced earth): "His voice will probably last a bit longer because he knows what he's doing and being very controlled about it." Mikael Akerfeldt (Opeth): "He's got a nice voice." Mikael Akerfeldt growling: "There's no way he's producing that sound naturally. Either that or he's doing it very quietly and it's made to sound much bigger."
  11. I'm a metal/progressive rock/classical guy taking lessons with a classical opera singer. It's always an interesting thing bringing her vocals to listen to. Some get better reviews than others, but the most common thing I hear from her is that the vast majority of vocalists are wrong for my voice, because they're just too high and light, and I have a bigger voice with a darker color. I kinda knew that was true of someone like James LaBrie, but Bruce Dickinson, Eric Adams, Dio, etc. I wouldn't have called them smaller voices, or the highest, or the thinnest, but to her they are. I one guy she thought was a bit closer match for my voice was Tim 'Ripper' Owens, or maybe that I could get get away with singing stuff from baritone-y guys like Eric Clayton of Savior Machine, who has a cool voice but it's usually a different thing. To her, a voice like Geddy Lee is just an exceptionally odd VERY light and high male voice, almost off the spectrum, and 90% of the rock singers out there are light, thin tenors. She asks if I have some other things to bring her that aren't like that, but it seems in rock, almost everyone has that sound, and with the exception of a few baritones here and there. The implication - the world of rock and pop is just filled to the brim with light tenors wherever you look these days. Even on Broadway these days this is all the rage: (Also interesting my teacher thought the composer should be shot for making the singer do that B5 at the end in that style, because it's certain to cause damage over time, and this singer did indeed have to take a break because of voice trouble I think). I mean, if you listen to something like this: ...this kind of voice can't help but sound a bit old fashioned. But really, it's just a natural male voice, singing as it would naturally sound. But there's practically no place for that voice in pop or rock, it seems. I suppose the question is, to what extent are we talking about just a lot of thin tenors, and to what extent are we talking about singers who might be baritones or low tenors, but who thinning their sound out, because that's the style?
  12. Hello everybody! So my last thread I asked for help on mixed/ middle register. I have been working on it for a little while now but I still feel like I'm shouting and using too much air on belting high notes. It's as if I'm trying to sing it rather than just letting the sound out. Here is a comparison: and me lol: Any tips or advice is appreciated. Don't know if I'm shouting because I can't get that cord closure properly in my higher registers or if it's a bunch of different things. Woke up a little hoarse today too after singing for around 2-3 hours heavily. this is so annoying Thank you ! Love this forum for all the help I get
  13. Hi to everyone! I've been reading this forum for a couple of years now and always found it very interesting and helpful in dealing with some of my own issues, so I thought I'd post this project that I've got going on. For a long time, I have suffered from vocal tension and inability to sing past D4 without pushing the "chest voice"/ overly-engaging the TA's basically. However, in the last year or so, I have experienced great relief after starting to do falsetto exercises suggested by Anthony Frisell in his manual "Training Baritone Voices". After reading many other sources later on, I have started questioning the usefulness of voice classification, purely from psychological point in the beginning (belief that one is a lower voice and its effect on the voice and singing), but now also physiological (neglecting upper range), especially in contemporary music (pop, rock, jazz, music theatre...). So now, I am writing a dissertation on the validity of voice classification in contemporary music and have already got some interesting answers. However, since there is barely any research done in relation to contemporary music, I would really be grateful if any of the members here, who give voice lessons, would participate. This is the link if anyone is interested: https://goo.gl/forms/uLMWByDMKYv4IWMk1 Thank you and feel free to spread the link if you find it useful! In general, I would also love to hear your opinions on this. Do you think tutors should classify their students and why?
  14. I was updating my website today and thought I'd add a new product for the fun of it. I don't know if I'll do this forever but as of right now I guess i'm a vocal coach. anyways..... if you're interested http://jaromeubanks.com/merch/c9om5vie7lbht7buj4v4o428wutdbc
  15. I'm curious if I am doing this right... I'm not even sure how to explain it. Here is a guy teaching it .. it's in korean but he's basically saying try to "pull" the sound out from the chest instead of having the sound fly out through ur mouth. Can someone explain to me in what way is this taught normally? Is this just the feel of "open throat?" or "support"? AND if this is how it should feel then how do I get that "mask" placement without losing that DEEP breath support? This way helped me develop my mix but I'm curious if this method is correct and is just another way of teaching the same thing? example done by a professional performance. (The sound literally sounds like a really low soft mix voice in the intro and when belting it sounds like the vibrato is so free and resonating really low. Is this how proper singing should be done? I am just wondering on how I should properly train and do warmups/workouts..
  16. Gill Appleby

    Wade In The Water (Smule)

    https://www.smule.com/recording/eva-cassidy-wade-in-the-water/830708093_1214803719
  17. A voice change can indicate a problem of the vocal health. It can range from cold to allergies and even vocal cord cancer. Here are a few voice changes that can indicate a certain problem: 1. Raspy voice- This voice is caused due to the growth of vocal cord nodules. The prominent reason of this is due to the misuse and overstraining of the voice. It is important that in order to maintain the voice, one should take singing lessons at a certified vocal school. 2. Hoarseness of voice- This kind of voice can be a symptom of throat cancer, thyroid cancer, lime disease, or brain tumors which are caused due to excessive smoking. Therefore, it is important that one must not smoke and live a healthy life. 3. Nasal voice- It is also known as hyponasal which is typically caused by deviated septum which can cause cold and chronic allergies. Therefore, it is necessary that one should properly maintain the vocal health. Maintaining the vocal health is very necessary to avoid any problems in the near future. Therefore, one should not strain the voice unnecessarily and take help of a professional to keep the vocal health maintained. ---------------------- I am Music Tutor, I like to motivate people to join music, and make a brilliant career in singing. Please share your experience. ------------------- Vocal School San Jose | Voice lessons san jose | Voice Classes san jose
  18. Hey guys I'm going to be producing a weekly vocal tip video series starting end of January. Honestly I've never really watched any of these type of series and was wondering if there were any topics people wanted covered. If it's something I have experience with I will be happy to oblige. Thanks so much.
  19. Recently I have noticed a lot of bad behavior when it comes to the treatment of others in the singing community (specifically Tristan the controversial former member of the forum). He has posted some videos "attacking" other coaches but to me, they were actually more playful and brought some light on a lot of the bull sh*t that is so popular in the community these days. If you watch his videos you know that the majority the coaches he "attacks" he actually supports a lot of what they have to say. However, on the other side I have seen nothing but bullying and harassment to him. Yea, his vocal method is heavily flawed, yea his bashing videos sometimes go to far and yea he maybe has a little to much beef with Robert (although I don't know what has happened behind the scenes) but he deserves to be treated like a human being..... he has brought a lot of quality ideas and concepts to the community, please have respect thanks!
  20. Yo! All my fellow singing geeks! I came across the article I've linked here (below video). I thought it is was very well written (a quick read), and includes a couple comments by Justin Stoney (coach most of us probably know from Youtube). I have read & posted in our "techniques" forum regarding so called "Natural Singers," percentages of the population who are or are not, training, and etc. Hope this helps lend some clarity to the matter(s). article - Singing Tips: Have A Certain Skull Shape, And Other Science Behind Carrying A Tune http://www.medicaldaily.com/singing-tips-have-certain-skull-shape-and-other-science-behind-carrying-tune-308372
  21. I just had a vocal lesson before, and this kinda drove me nuts, because I'm sure I'm right, but so was she ("I'll bet you money on it"), so I just needed to confirmation that I am right: Tenors read the treble clef, but sound an octave lower, yes? The highest range for a classical bass or baritone would be around F# or G, and you would write that 2 1/2 or 3 lines above bass clef, which is the same as the second line of treble clef. If we're singing, say, a Schubert baritone piece, the G written above the Treble clef will sound an octave lower. Pavarotti hitting his high C would be written two lines above the treble clef, but sound an octave lower; as the third space in the treble celf ...and high rock singer like Eric Adams of Manowar here at 5:13 : ...is hitting a high F# a tritone above Pavarotti, which would be WRITTEN 3 lines and a space above the treble clef for a tenor, but SOUND on the top line of the treble clef. She is trying to tell me that this is wrong. That tenors do NOT read an octave off, that the high F# in the Manowar is the same as a top line F# in a Schubert piece ("You only think it's higher because his voice is so thin"), and Pavarotti hitting his high C is going a tritone above both. And...unless I'm missing something huge, that can't possibly be right. Yes? Or no? I mean, I tried to show her by singing the pitch, and showing where it sounded the same on the piano, and she kept insisting, "No, you're singing that (plays an octave higher)" It got so we both had to just drop it. But...this seems obvious to me. So, what's the verdict?
  22. Just something I have been thinking about for the last 2 days. I see these people online advertising singing lesson in categories of novice, intermediate and advanced. And I know there are quite a few teachers that use this forum that would use the same categories. But do you often have an advanced student that has been with you a long time where comes the time there is not much more you can teach them and there training is complete? If this is the case what do they normally do after this point?
  23. 2 cats in a dust bin

    How to find a singing teacher?

    So many people have told me on different sites that I need to find a teacher as explaining exercises in writing is hard and tips are hard to come by online If I was to look for one to one lessons with someone local to my area where/ how would be the best place to look? I mean I want a proper teacher and not some £$%@ I have seen a lot of online videos on you tube of people claiming to be professional teachers and I have to say many of them are not very good at all. Is there some kind of registered governing body that deals with singing teachers? Thanks
  24. Kevin Ashe

    Vocal Coaching For Kids

    Hello all vocal coaches and any others here at TMVW "in the know" on this subject. The other day my great nephew said he wants to take vocal lessons. He's 8 years old and loves to sing & dance. He has good relative pitch, and is above average in his sense of rhythm. This was brought up to me in the context of what do they do? and, how should he go about finding a good vocal coach? I explained the basic concepts of "one voice," appaggio, vowel modification, and my favorite, onsets (as I have learned them from The Four Pillars Of Singing). I'm not sure, how different is it to coach a little kid? Obviously, you must have a gift for communicating with a child that age. I didn't google this subject, just thought there had to be someone in the TMVW that can give me some guidance for him. I'd appreciate knowing how one might interview a coach claiming to specialize in kids to discover if they have the specialty mastered. o.k., look forward to some great info as usual, THANKS! k