Mike Lowrey

Vowel Modifications / Sound colours

Rate this topic

4 posts in this topic

Hey Rob ! 

Howzitgoin' ?
 
I'm practicing ( not as much as I would want : Work + daughter and stuff ...)
During our lesson, we was reaching an E4 and then came the time to do vowel modifications
 
We went obviously from Eh to a Ah or Uh
and you said : Ah is your Trebble knob,
Uh is your Bass Knob
and said that formants are this : Multiple sound colours at the same time
 
Is that to say that we can have simultaneously
Eh+AH+Uh vowels blended together ?
 
or is it just EH+AH
or EH+ Uh
 
Simply put : 
Can we have more than 2 vowels blended together ?
If yes, how many of them then ? 
 
Question might sound silly, but I was wondering
 
Let me know
 
Thanx 
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mike, 

Thanks for sharing your questions with the TVS community.

Ok, you are confused about those vowels a bit.  I did not say that "Ah" was the treble knob. I more likely said that "ae/a" (fat cats) was a vowel that amplifies higher frequencies, and thus, is your "treble knob". "A" as in "cat"... "Ah" is the TVS neutral vowel, as in "father". It is important that you are calling the right vowels and writing them properly. See the IPA tables in your copy of The Four Pillars of Singing

21 hours ago, Mike Lowrey said:

and said that formants are this : Multiple sound colours at the same time

Yes, I did. Mike go to the red pages in the back of your book and look at the illustration titled, "Speaking Vowels" vs "Singing Vowels" with the color stripes... the Singing Vowels illustration shows the colors gradient, or blending. This is a visual way of saying that singing vowels, or formants are actually a combination of more then one vowel color at one time. Be sure to watch the lessons in the Formants and Vowels module of your copy of The Four Pillars of Singing... its all explained in those lesson. But here is some videos I did on it on YouTube.

Notice the first illustration in this presentation below:

21 hours ago, Mike Lowrey said:
Is that to say that we can have simultaneously
Eh+AH+Uh vowels blended together ?

Mike, that is correct... when we train our workouts in TVS, at the top... as you move higher in frequency, a well tuned formant would have a blend of "Eh & A", Red edging vowels that resonant in the forward palate and "Uh & Ou", Blue curbing vowels that resonant in the backward, soft palate position.

Watch this video as it demonstrations how, when we assign colors to vowels, we can show the vowels blending into formants as we change in frequency.

21 hours ago, Mike Lowrey said:
Can we have more than 2 vowels blended together ?
If yes, how many of them then ? 
 
Question might sound silly, but I was wondering

Yes, you can... as the above video explains... and this is not a silly question. It is insightful... you sound like a TVS student that is beginning to "get it".

Mike, make sure you go to all the lessons and take the quizzes in the training system.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Man !

Thanx for your response ! 

Sorry for the late answer , yes , I did a mistake about that a/ae vowel :-)

I went back to the Vowels and formant lectures ... It said that you can have 3 vowels together , if I got it right !

Really interesting...

Having the Vowel you're meant to pronounce + a/ae in the forward palate + that Uh in the backward soft palate must feel like a kinda stretch, right ?

Sorry too for not having checked the book yet, I will ASAP

Guys, feel free to participate , I'd love to have your input too, if you want : - ) 

( The first post was a Copy/Paste of an email question and I shared it there , didn't mean to exclude anybody : - ) )

 

Thanx  a lot !!! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎1‎/‎27‎/‎2016 at 5:51 PM, Mike Lowrey said:

 

Having the Vowel you're meant to pronounce + a/ae in the forward palate + that Uh in the backward soft palate must feel like a kinda stretch, right ?

Thanx  a lot !!! 

Sounds right to me and the way I have understood. It's like using a vowel shape for a formant while articulating a word in the lyric that actually has another vowel.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now