Bevin Hernandez

Little log...more like a stick, really

Rate this topic

4 posts in this topic

I've now had a few wonderful lessons with Robert and I'm still working through my lessons :) So much material in The Four Pillars. Seriously good stuff.

When I started, after years of singing classically in mostly head register, I had an extremely limited belt range (for a woman). So limited that I was only able to hit G4 or so in belt. 

I've been at this for 3 or so weeks now, and I'm up to a solid D5 in a strong belt using the onset and sirens, and today on a few sirens I was able to bridge up to my F#5 smoothly and cleanly with almost zero tonal change. I still have a LOT of work to do, but holy shnikes. I'm not solid yet - I have a lot more practicing to do but I have to say I'm pleased.

I'll keep going with the log, so that progress can be seen and heard, but I'm super happy so far!!!

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok 100% totally lied, after practicing Attack and Release tonight, I hit a D6 with no ugly break, no awful notes.

A D-FREAKING-6 (before I stopped because the dog was looking at me funny).

Wahoo!!!

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome. It has been really fun working with you Bevin and giving you the "tough love" to shape you into shape. I appreciate your patience and fortitude to stick it out. Keep going, you are now on the cusp of really getting this method in your head so you can train freely with a clear understanding of what you are doing and what you need to do. Focus on building the TA muscle strength and narrowing of the acoustics... you are close... stick with it!!

Coach

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every person I have seen, objectively, that has either had lessons with Robert or used his program successfully has benefited greatly. Not just singers who started with a great sound and improved but others who had some problems to clear up and did so. Even if it involved the quintessential tibetan monk thing of emptying your teacup mind of the tea of preconceptions you have in order to receive the new tea of enlightenment that brings the understanding you were looking for.

Someone could say, well, you have made these gains because you practiced and trained with dedication and consistency and that is true and helpful. It is even more helpful when you have the right materials and content to explain concepts and someone who is able to communicate these effectively. And that is Robert Lunte and the 4 Pillars of Singing. And, to me, the gigantic size of content, while more than pretty much another system you can get for the price or less,is great, what is more important is how effective it is. Any person could create sound files. But to organize it meaningfully is another skill. As well as the thing singular to 4P that I am not aware of in other programs, though I have not really studied those other programs, the concept of workflow.

How many times does a student say, great, I have all this stuff, what do I study and in what order? Because some people do need that. Others, please don't take offense, but I have to deal with this in my job, in different things but same concept. It is one thing to say put on socks and shoes and then tie shoes. You will have students and people that don't know what order of events to take. So, first, put on the socks, left foot first, right foot second. Then shoes. Then tie the shoes. Then they finish that and tell me they have no pants on. My fault, I did not start early enough. :D

(are you telling me, Ron, that you have to tell guys how to clean themselves in the bathroom? Yes, and sometimes, literally, and that is another story ...)

So, the modern 4P has the advantage of workflow. And I think the most important work of onsets. And I am willing to bet that the dedicated work schedule combined with onsets development is what is making all parts of the range more accessible and consistent. And knowing what to work on and in what order to work it.

I write these things to applaud, of course, Robert's dedicated work but also yours, Bevin. A teacher can only do so much. The student must work, also. And I am willing to bet that any physical condition real or imagined pales in comparison to the mental acuity and flexibiilty you have had to truly evolve and release the voice that is within you.

Robert does not have videos where he tells you how to sing like a famous singer, or sound like them. He teaches you so that you will be the next iconic and famous singer.

So, what is the background or creds of a good teacher? I think it is not as easy as pointing to a piece of paper or even past history. It would not matter if Robert had done nothing else in life but sing. He has done many things. What matters is that he is good at this, now.

For example, I have other skills and accomplishments outside of singing. I have been doing electrical work since 1983, studying electricity and physics and math since 1975. I have a master electrician license in Texas. I am operations manager for an electrical contractor.

I have studied 6 martial arts styles. Of those, I have formal class instruction on three of them, Tae Kwon Do, Aiki-jujutsu, Kenpo Karate. (It started with Kenpo in 1977.) I have received informal training from a friend who was a SEAL.

I have received formal and informal training in firearms, mostly revolver and shotgun and basic competence in long gun or rifle. I once had a special permit to carry a gun and my last re-qualification at the range at 50' was 145 points out of 150, shooting 30 rounds. 2 in the head, 3 in the heart. That earned me a master marksman pin on handgun. The instructor used his sight glass to follow the dirt puffs behind the target because I was going through the same holes. Smith and Wesson .357 Magnum, Model 19 k-frame with ivory overgrips and shooting 125 grain .38 ammo. It weighed a little over 3 pounds, which actually helps dampen the re-coil.

I have been a bodyguard and bouncer, armed and unarmed. I once was bodyguard to Natalie Cole for a show in Dallas. Bodyguard to the son of the Shah of Iran. (He had business in Dallas. Sometimes the best deterrent is a guard like me, 6' 6", armed to the teeth with weaponry including hands and feet.)

Point of all this is to show that having these other interests and abilities does not make me less of a singer. Nor would have concentrating only on singing and nothing else in life necessarily make me a better singer.

And so, for Robert, even if he did not spend the last 20 or 25 years singing for a famous band or two, or have loads of high-selling albums, or has had other careers does not prevent him from being the successful and effective teacher that he is now. This is thing is his skill set. The proof is in the pudding.

So, not only has he done well in providing the thing you needed, you have done well in choosing it and working with it and I can only see you being awesome and the only limits are those that you place upon yourself.

Yes, it helps and may be a superficial selling point, icing on the cake, as it were, that Robert sings well on everything he does and he could do that without being a teacher, although being a teacher causes the teacher to learn as much as does the student. And I know because I have also been a teacher, informally and formally, teaching electrical trade skills.

But Robert being an effective teacher is a separate skill set from being a singer. It is a different skill set than having all the content and materials he has, even though they are comprehensive, extensive, and helpful. It still comes down to the talent and skill of Robert, in written and spoken word, to communicate.

Again, brava to you, Beven, and bravo to Robert for the dedicated work you both do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now