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RowboCaup

Mixed Voice in Male Classical Singing

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I have tried searching the internet and forum for clear answers to my questions, but can't seem to find anything coherent. Here are my questions:

1. Does mixed voice (speech level singing mixed voice) belong in classical singing (please specify male and female)?

2. What are the differences between classical technique (male and female), and mixed voice?

3. How can mixed voice be applied to classical singing/teaching?

They may seem like generic questions, but look it up yourself, nothing on the web is clear. These need clear concise answers for the world to understand! Thank you for your contributions.

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1. Mixed resonance is very much part of Classical singing. I've had many classical student come to me with a beautiful mixed resonance a seemless and long transition between pure chest voice and pure/light-mass head voice. 

2. There is no difference. It's not some mystical third register, it's the formant shift and trasition between chest and head registers. This is used in contemporary voice as well, but contemporary usually leans more into belting and twang than simply mixed resonance.

3. It is already part of it. If you listen closely to a classically well-trained student do a siren from chest to head voice, there is a very obvious fading out of the TA muscles as they get higher in pitch and the formant shifts further back.

Perhaps your questions come from a misunderstanding of what it is. What do you think "mixed voice" is?

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Sls mixed voice is not really the mixed voice used in classical singing. The difference being listen to Bocelli who does use the sls type of mixed voice compared to Pavarotti, Raimondi, Aragall, these singers used mixed voice and strengthened it as a register within itself. 

The difference in classical singing between men and women are women don't really use their raw chest voice and sing high notes much more in their head voice, men sing their high notes in mixed voice.

mixed voice is applied to classical singing just listen to guys like I mentioned and you will hear it

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Yeah, mixed voice as used in SLS is rarely used in classical singing now. It had a bigger role in more ancient times. However, classical singers DO use a mixed voice in the sense Daniel and Draven described. This register is also sometimes called "male head voice" in classical singing.

You have to keep in mind that there are two parts of registration. There is the action of the vocal folds and the shift of the resonance. The vocal folds have two basic vibration modes (actually four, but 90% of the times two are enough for singing). They are called M1 and M2. In M1 the full body of the vocal folds is vibrating, in M2 only the outer edges. Also in M1 the vocal folds close over their full depth, while in M1 they only close on the upmost layer.

There is no register "in between" M1 and M2. However, it is possible to reduce the vibration depth in M1 and it is also possible to increase vibration depth in M2. This action is needed for a smooth transition between them without an obvious crack. Both coordinations (M1 with reduced depth and M2 with increased depth) could be called "mixed voice". In vocal research M1 with reduced depth is often called "chestmix" and M2 with increased depth is often called "headmix".

The SLS version of "mixed voice" refers to "headmix", but classical singers usually use "chestmix" for their high notes.

On the other hand, there is also the "switch of resonances" which happens at a certain pitch (usually around E4 for males). At this point the harmonics of the sung note go above the first formant of the vocal tract. When this happens there is less resonance for the voice to work on and it is easy to "crack" at that point because without that resonance you need more stability in terms of support and fold closure to keep going.

The resonance passaggio is usually encountered by the use of "covering" which helps to make the transition out of the first formant resonance more smoothly and controlled. The area in the voice where you do the covering is sometimes called "mixed resonance" as it is a position where you are neither in full "chest resonance" nor completely out of it.

 

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