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 It has been a while since I have presented anything. I still have not found time for true practice but I have improved since receiving the FOUR PILLARS OF SINGING

Any tips would be appreciated. Thanks

 

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Yeh! I'm looking forward to hearing it. I'll get to it in the morning Joe!

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MDEW,

Nice, soft acoustic version. Kinda reminds me a bit of Bob Dylan, but I dare say, your a better singer then Dylan.

At this light and soft approach, there is little risk and therefore, little to critique. 

But I would say this... Why are you allowing your sound color to be so thin Joe? It sounds like there is no larynx dampening and/or added warm vowels to your resonance. I would like to hear this again, same approach, but conscientiously try to "man-up" and warm the sound color. Let's get more beefy modal voice behind this. It is kind of thin and tinny. I don't believe it has to be.

Shoot again Joe.

Hope this helps.

 

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2 minutes ago, Robert Lunte said:

MDEW,

Nice, soft acoustic version. Kinda reminds me a bit of Bob Dylan, but I dare say, your a better singer then Dylan.

At this light and soft approach, there is little risk and therefore, little to critique. 

But I would say this... Why are you allowing your sound color to be so thin Joe? It sounds like there is no larynx dampening and/or added warm vowels to your resonance. I would like to hear this again, same approach, but conscientiously try to "man-up" and warm the sound color. Let's get more beefy modal voice behind this. It is kind of thin and tinny. I don't believe it has to be.

Shoot again Joe.

Hope this helps.

 

     Thanks for listening. To be honest I ran through this song quite a few times trying different things. My first approach was heavier and more matter of fact rather than soft. I viewed a few covers by other people to get a handle on the acoustic guitar rhythm. Most of the other singers used a lighter approach and I guess I let myself be influenced by them. I will rerecord this and see how it goes.

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I've never heard this song so light. Very cool!

Watch your diphthongs in your accent. If you focus more on the main vowel to sing out, then pitch, accent, and timbre will lock in more often. Another thing to watch out for is anticipating the next note or over-relaxing at the ends of your phrases, both causing the note to fall. Again, that will start to go away when you focus on singing out your main vowels. What Robert mentioned, singing with a bit more weight, might also help stabilize the issues I mentioned.

 

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1 hour ago, Draven Grey said:

I've never heard this song so light. Very cool!

Watch your diphthongs in your accent. If you focus more on the main vowel to sing out, then pitch, accent, and timbre will lock in more often. Another thing to watch out for is anticipating the next note or over-relaxing at the ends of your phrases, both causing the note to fall. Again, that will start to go away when you focus on singing out your main vowels. What Robert mentioned, singing with a bit more weight, might also help stabilize the issues I mentioned.

 

   Thanks Draven, I have embraced my identity more as a story teller than a singer. Jim Croce, James Taylor, Jackson Browne along with Dylan and John Prine. 

I dropped the key from Bb or B to G so the highest note as I sing it is G4 staying away from the dreaded passaggio.  As I mentioned above after watching other people perform this on acoustic I thought I had been singing it a bit too heavy. With any luck I will be able to rerecord this evening with the suggestions that you and Robert made along with my original approach before being influenced by the way others have presented this.

  I have been trying to get a handle on my dipthongs for some time now.  I grew up with Bluegrass/Country gospel. Part of their appeal is a thin piercing sound. It goes well with the Banjo and fiddle but leaves a little to be desired for other types of music.

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17 hours ago, Draven Grey said:

Watch your diphthongs in your accent. If you focus more on the main vowel to sing out, then pitch, accent, and timbre will lock in more often

Excellent. Diphthongs are one of the biggest culprits to singing problems and they are quite hidden and not noticed unless a good coach points it out to you. Often times, the "trigger" that is making the voice break, chirp or otherwise shit out... is the diphthongs. Why? Because if you examine diphthongs closely, you discover that they are all typically, closed vowels; /i/, /u/ &  the /r/ controlled vowels; /er/, /ar/, /ir/, /ur/, etc... these are the bugs in a lot of people's singing. Be aware. On top of that, I hate trying to spell the word diphthong. 

17 hours ago, Draven Grey said:

Another thing to watch out for is anticipating the next note or over-relaxing at the ends of your phrases, both causing the note to fall.

Another really important insight. YES. Most singers will start their onsets low and scoop up and end their offsets with a slide down. Once or twice in a song may not be a big deal, but do this repeatedly on every single phrase and you have a major pitch problem. With a few stylistic exceptions, 90% of the time, get in clean and get out clean. 

17 hours ago, Draven Grey said:

Again, that will start to go away when you focus on singing out your main vowels.

As a sort of general rule, ... "singing" happens on vowels/sound colors.... not consonants and diphthongs". So in a sense, get to the vowel and stay on the vowel as long as is reasonable. Get the hell off the diphthong as soon as you can. An exception might be singing low in your range, something that is more balladish. There are always stylistic exceptions.

17 hours ago, Draven Grey said:

What Robert mentioned, singing with a bit more weight, might also help stabilize the issues I mentioned.

Because the "weight" not only darkens the sound color which is probably preferred, but it is also a symptom of more musculature engagement Joe. TA, higher closed quotient, more "fat" , surface area and probably some cricoid tilt which tends to also stretch and tighten down things.

GO JOE!!

:cool::z-coffee::headbang:

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 I finally had the opportunity to record this again, Let me know if I did better or worse. Thanks.

 

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On 5/15/2017 at 7:09 PM, MDEW said:

 I finally had the opportunity to record this again, Let me know if I did better or worse. 

So, in this post I discover your name is "Joe."  I always enjoy your musical posts Joe! You possess a great authentic folk sound that can't be taught too easily.

Also, good song choice for a folk interpretation! Nice work!

My observation is that you need to apply two simple techniques.  Your high notes in each of the "complete" lines of lyrics:  "and 'round"   "my love"  "they say that the road....." etc.  are pitch tentative.  In my opinion, you should be able to fix this with minimal effort.  The two techniques, 1-appoggio 2-sing with M2 (no chest pulling) on the highest notes.  Both of these techniques are most needed on the line, " strangers learn to fall in love again..."

Are you seated while playing your guitar and singing?  I know that when I am seated to play and sing, got to be on top of posture to make lung room, also more conscious of diaphragm action when seated.

of course, vowel modification is something that always demands scrutiny AND, often fixes pitch issues as well. I did not think of this while listening.  That's all I hear Joe, what do you think?

 

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  Thanks for the responce Keven. Yes, I was sitting down while playing guitar and recording. Another problem is that I make these recordings around midnight while others are trying to sleep.

 My break is slightly below G4 and that is the note for "Fall in Love". I play this in the Key of G By the way.  I have been having a bit of success by modifying to "F-Ah-L" rather than "F-aw- L". If I am going to go ahead and sing in M2 on that note I might as well raise the key to be further in my head voice rather than right on by breaking note.

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1 hour ago, MDEW said:

I have been having a bit of success by modifying to "F-Ah-L" rather than "F-aw- L".

InterResting!  yes, vowel modification is my number one downfall when encountering pitch or texture issues with a particular challenging lyric. It is often corrected (for me) by modifying the vowel.

1 hour ago, MDEW said:

If I am going to go ahead and sing in M2 on that note I might as well raise the key to be further in my head voice rather than right on by breaking note.

Yes Joe however, choose a song that has your undeveloped "low head tones" in it so you can check your progress. Your comments reminded me of a classic Rob Lunte video!  Strong low head tones are the grandest illusion in the physics of singing! Name any awesome singer, their low head tones are likely really well developed!! 

 

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   Of course you are correct, avoiding the problem will not solve anything. Did the problem area sound any better in the first recording? Perhaps lightening on the mid areas will help lead to the G4. Or did I just end up with the same issue?

   I am still struggling with my Accent also. Words like Round and Clown mess with me while speaking.  I am not sure whether my lips are trying to shape the vowel or if my larynx is the problem. I always tend to put an "Ow" in there. Like the sound you make when someone hurts you. Modifying the vowel/dipthong sounds wrong to me. 

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