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So I have always been into singing but have never had any formal vocal training. Chris Cornell was my favorite vocalist and his recent unfortunate passing reinvigorated by interest in singing. I have always been fascinated by how full Chris sounded in his head voice/falsetto, assuming that's what he uses when he goes high. 

I tried to sing Cochise by Chris Cornell. I am unsure whether this is what Chris does, since, in comparison to him, my voice sounds very thin when I go into my head voice. 

I would like to get some feedback and hopefully some pointers about what I am doing right and wrong. 
 

Cochiseaudio2.mp3

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Your pitch is spot on for the most part. That is the most difficult thing to train in singing, so you've got a 1-up on most people who haven't taken lessons.

The thinness you're experience is because you need to be training strength and control of your TA muscles (chest-voice musculature) to be able to carry them up into that range. I don't mean just yelling at full force either, but rather training in how to turn them on without strain - which there's a point where they have to taper off. You can train your body to be able to use TA engagement for that "chesty" sound as high as your head voice can go. On top of TA engagement, Chris also used larynx dampening often, really solid acoustic mode and vowel modification as he went higher, incredible bridging and connecting of teh voice, and very solid breath support. He's also a great example of a singer who trained to completely relax his voice no matter what he was singing. 

If you want to be able to sing like that, then get determined to learn and start training. Check out The Four Pillars of Singing. it's an incredible program, and you'll get a ridiculous amount of solid instruction for the price.

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