sigsig

Need help reaching C6

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Hi, first post here.

Simple question regarding getting myself to sustain a pitch at C6. (Octave above the mens high C, I am a male by the way). I find that I can produce the most of the vowels anytime at D5, but I find that I need to warm up before being able to go higher then that, and when I do warm up and when I do go higher then that, then I can mostly just sustain the vowel OH (pronounced in the word so) and most often only up to F#5 but sometimes G#5. I have a feeling that I need to somehow shift gears in that area to get higher. I do not want to force myself to go any higher then that.

Do you have any tips or information on this subject?

Do you think I just need to practice scales, going regularly up and down and eventually the muscles that produce the pitch will start to stretch or do you think that this is a technical problem.?

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I still cannot understand why a male needs to sing a C6. Anyway......My understanding is the vowels converge the higher you go. If you are getting anything up there you are good. You are not going to be singing words at that pitch anyway. Florishes or runs are what you would be singing.

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It's physics. I know, boring. Anyway ....

A note needs a space properly sized to resonate. At about D5, and this is true for all voice types, there is not enough space to resonate both the fundamental and partials that create a particular vowel. There is only room for the fundamental. So, at D5 and above, all notes have the same "vowel" sound. No amount of training or magic pill technique can change physics.

A vowel sound is a matter of certain partials being enhanced and others attenuated. There is no possible way, physically or anatomically to create the vowel sound at the folds. It happens in the resonators. Forever, and amen.

This has been physics with ron (the redneck) ws.

:)

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If you cant go above g#5 dont worry about C6 worry about A5 A#5 B5 ect... Also what causes people to stop i usually the vowel in that range.

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If you cant go above g#5 dont worry about C6 worry about A5 A#5 B5 ect... Also what causes people to stop i usually the vowel in that range.

That is what I am worrying about. I am just trying to figure out, if this has to do with support, vocal abductor muscles or lack of cricothyroid muscle strenth, or technigue...

It just feels like im stuck there...

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Just keep working at it one half step at a time. Believe me, it will come over time but you can't force it. Think smaller and thinner as you attempt to gain that next half step. Once you reach it, it will grow over the next week. Just try to reach for the highest note only ONCE a day. Then rest and try again the next day. If you try too hard you'll just delay the muscles from gaining strength and the process will take longer. It may take you a week or two for each half step. And you might hit a ceiling for a while. What you are describing is normal.

The vowels all sound the same up there because the fundamental is above the formants. And since formants make vowels recognizable, you can't distinguish them at those pitches.

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Hm! I am by no means a pro or a teacher, but I feel I have to interject here anyway!

The voice I use in the middle of the fifth octave is not the same I use in the end of the fifth and in the beginning of the sixth. I use mixed vocals in the middle of the fifth octave, but on the higher notes I go full <whatever you call it>. It might be the same thing for the OP, so trying to extend the mixed vocals might be the wrong approach (unless he naturally falls into the proper mode while doing so). But for me, the transition from mixed vocals to the vocals I use to reach my highest notes is not trivial.

Actually, I find it easier to make a D6 than a really good C#5, which perhaps illustrates the difference between the two voices.

But then again, my voice is pretty big and gritty, which can make a nice-sounding bridging harder. If the OP sings softer, chances are that he transitions much more easily.

My point is, I think we all would get more out of this by hearing you sing, sigsig :)

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Hm! I am by no means a pro or a teacher, but I feel I have to interject here anyway!

The voice I use in the middle of the fifth octave is not the same I use in the end of the fifth and in the beginning of the sixth. I use mixed vocals in the middle of the fifth octave, but on the higher notes I go full <whatever you call it>. It might be the same thing for the OP, so trying to extend the mixed vocals might be the wrong approach (unless he naturally falls into the proper mode while doing so). But for me, the transition from mixed vocals to the vocals I use to reach my highest notes is not trivial.

Actually, I find it easier to make a D6 than a really good C#5, which perhaps illustrates the difference between the two voices.

But then again, my voice is pretty big and gritty, which can make a nice-sounding bridging harder. If the OP sings softer, chances are that he transitions much more easily.

My point is, I think we all would get more out of this by hearing you sing, sigsig :)

To me, that sounds a lot like saying that you sing differently than you speak and that one must make adjustments along the way, even if the effect is "one voice."

Fascinating, you may be onto something, there.

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Being worried about this usually means you should be concerned with other aspects, that most likely are not range related.

Also, this:

My point is, I think we all would get more out of this by hearing you sing, sigsig

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Perhaps a stupid question, but even if all the vowels sound the same ("voewls converge") ,can it be easier with one mouth shape than another? That is directing towards a certain vowel could make it easier although they all sound alike?

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C6 is the soprano note above the staff? We no longer have any sopranos in our choir that can hit that note (some of ours could when younger). They get pretty screechy around G5, A5 on a good day.

So there are men who sing that note? Other than countertenors?

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C6 is the soprano note above the staff? We no longer have any sopranos in our choir that can hit that note (some of ours could when younger). They get pretty screechy around G5, A5 on a good day.

So there are men who sing that note? Other than countertenors?

Well it's harder to reach c6 in a adducted head voice. Since women don't often have a full falsetto to begin with, they can't exactly reach a c6 with semi-adduction/falsetto, and rather they are limited to how high they can go because their head voice adduction is not that good yet.

I think that tenors, and countertenors/altos can definitely reach that note, but hitting it fully will vary on the person.

I attempted to sing a C6 but it seems too high for my voice. B5 is a much more sane top note for my range.

http://www.mediafire.com/listen/90tpbhy26143h4a/c6test2.mp3

Here's a test I did. This is like borderline almost B5 with a few C6's mixed in. I'm getting way to screechy at each C6 area.

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Although "reaching" stuff looks fascinating at first, you will realize sooner or later that it makes no difference and it´s the details necessary to sing your repertoire that will really improve you.

But, "C6 away"....

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C6 is the soprano note above the staff? We no longer have any sopranos in our choir that can hit that note (some of ours could when younger). They get pretty screechy around G5, A5 on a good day.

So there are men who sing that note? Other than countertenors?

Absolutely. A lot of males on this forum can and they aren't countertenors. In fact any male can train to sing c6 and beyond if they want to.

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btw, this is the first time I've recorded/focused on a C6. It needs a lot more work of course. I figured out that you can get a little extra force by tilting back a little bit at this note, but it's best not to worry about posture as you can mess things up easily.. I've been practicing it more today and I already have more bite and clarity.

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with all due respect chummels, so what?

an analogy would be you have a super fast race car....but how well do you take the turns?

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Cool chumels, this thread is about hitting C6 not about worrying about slowjazzkeys and whatnot :) you stepped up and showed how it's to be done.

There are tons of other threads where we worry about agility,quality,passagio,Lou gram and whatnot ;) lets keep those discussions there

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Jens ahahah well but these are the things you will be working to go higher, wont it? Tensions, vowels, agility, the old boring stuff...

But ok, I give, the thread is about the high stuff. Trying to put what I said in another way: work as high as you want, but focus on finding out what is in the way of your progress instead of busting your way up thinking of the golden C6, or 8, 9 I don't know.

Better? :P

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Hello, I am also a boy, I recently reach to C # 6.
The general feeling is that the entire passage is smooth. First shut the mouth and“ hum hum ” in nose with a false sound, and then slowly open your mouth, I feel the passage is smooth. The higher the pitch, the more effort with the upper jaw, I don't know if this can help to you. However, I can only pronounce "o" or "ah" in this case, which is hard to say words.
Before this I was able to ‘suck out’ the G6-D7 dolphin sound, not very stable, only ‘sucked out’. I just want to complete my range of sound.

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Hello everyone. I've been trying to ask about pitching. When I'm pitching at A#5, the flow of air is outwards like I'm breathing out but when I start to pitch at C6 upwards, flow of air is onwards from the mouth like I'm taking in air for the sound to come out, I would like to know if there is any other way of doing it?

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