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  3. Bruno

    Working on a song

    In order to sing higher, you need to develop your pharyngeal voice. You should start connecting it with your chest voice at around an F4 or F#4. That's how you'll prevent pulling your chest voice up and sing very high effortlessly.
  4. Last week
  5. sp3c13srock

    Working on a song

    This song is out there. I like it, I'm happy with it, but I want to learn how to take my voice higher obviously. I'm a baritone I think. I can hit A4 but not with agility. This song goes up to F#4 which is typical of baritone. Constructive criticism is appreciated. Take a listen to my voice and let me know what you hear. Thank you! https://drive.google.com/open?id=1socIDJTGXkjGqf01oIiebfCOlYT3M06d
  6. MDEW

    Voice Lesson Help!

    So, is the problem singing higher or faster? If you are working higher and faster at the same time try working them separate to find the real issue.
  7. Thank you so much for your advice! She has a quiet voice in general. We did some exercises to help her open her throat and that seemed to help. Interesting idea about the complaining!
  8. T-Swizzle_voice

    Voice Lesson Help!

    I am teaching a student right now who is working on coloratura exercises. Often times when the student starts to sing them higher and faster the pitch accuracy goes out the window and he has trouble hitting the notes in tune. Any suggestions for ways I can help this student?
  9. SapperCav

    Crazy Deep Voice Help

    Thankyou Robert Lunte!
  10. Draven Grey

    HELP! Advice for my student!

    Look at my last comment in the post right before yours, "Teaching Breath Support." I've been posting hat video far too often lately. I think I need to post my own soon.
  11. Hello all! I am new at teaching voice lessons, and I was wondering if anyone could offer advice. How do you help a female voice use their breath to produce a more consistent sound, especially in their higher range?
  12. What are some techniques that will help a student learn how to use good breath support?
  13. Draven Grey

    Accessing Chest Voice/Head Voice

    I'm happy to help. Whimpering = Cry vocal mode, activating the cry reflex in the vocal tract, a top-down phonation that is similar to a puppy whimpering.
  14. Courtney Nottingham

    Accessing Chest Voice/Head Voice

    Thank you! What do you mean by "whimpering"?
  15. Draven Grey

    Accessing Chest Voice/Head Voice

    We tend to speak in the pitches at the lower end of our chest voice range. She could start with that, then raise the resonance out of the throat by whimpering a bit and singing into either her third-eye spot or a few feet in front of her. If you're thinking contemporary vocal styles, then it can also help for her to touch her tongue to her upper back molars and keep the tip near the front teeth. This brings the vowels more into the mask by way of the soft palate. If more classical in style, then focus more on the whimper I mentioned, solid appoggio (leaning breaths into the sternum and sighing the the phrases), and hooking around the back of her head and then into the mask. If she's too airy in her chest range, then she likely needs two things: (1) Between compression from doing things like humming and buzzing the lips through songs (also called Resonant Tracking or Nasal Buzzing), and starting in Quack/hyper-twang compression and then backing/tuning into the singing vowel. (2) Defining Mass (overall effort and push) for each phonation: light, medium, heavy, or in-between. And make sure her "medium mass" is solid, resonant singing. Light is effortless. And Heavy is shouting. This is a page straight out of TVS Methodology and The Four Pillars of Singing. I try to keep my students between medium-light and medium at all times. But those struggling with too much air are usually far too light and falsetto like. Also, you'll want to separate mass (overall effort and push) from volume (bigger resonance from solid breath support). For men in head voice range, it's a very similar set of techniques. Cry Vocal Mode and good Appoggio can quickly fix a lot of issues.
  16. Courtney Nottingham

    Accessing Chest Voice/Head Voice

    Updated question: What are some exercises that can be done in order to help a high school soprano access her chest voice with more ease?
  17. EEasiest way to Find Subharmonics, that I've found. 1. Sit back on recliner 2. Recline and tilt head back 3. Completely relax throat, head, and body 4. Take deep breath with diaphragm/ release half the air 5. Close vocal chords (swallow and maintain them closed) 6. Use the vowel "ee", on the most natural (not deep) SOUND (not note), that comes out 7. As you open them slowly, release the air from stomach (sigh softly) 8. If your still can't hear it, try adding more or less air gradually, and make sure you are 100% relaxed.
  18. SapperCav

    Bass or Tenor?

    Thank you for your response. That is alot of great information, I was unaware of. Definitely worth looking into further. I've only been teaching myself to sing for a month, and won't have my first lesson until January. I have a gut feeling, they will move me to Baritone. My voice peaks at about an F4, before becoming ear crinchingly Horrible! I literally cannot go higher than C4. My 2nd and 3rd octaves are my "natural" range, but for some reason it also seems to be the middle of my gap. It's difficult to find the correct Key in that range, for some reason. When I do though, it sounds much better, it's easier to manipulate resonance, easier to sing in pitch, etc. Doesn't make much sense if it's my easiest range, but the hardest to find. Any advice or suggestions on that particular issue?
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