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Singing First Thing in the Morning

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Jeran
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What's everyone's take on singing first thing in the morning? I know it takes 2-4 hours to warm up naturally, but I sing before that.

I get up at 6:20am, and when driving to work at 7am, I sing. I do about 5 minutes of lip rolls as a warm up, then move to NAYs on an octave scale, and go into sirens or something similar. I'm usually into full on singing by 10 minutes into the drive. Is this harmful? I don't feel any pain, and it doesn't seem to be obviously harming me, but is it potentially harmful to sing out without having been up for a few hours?

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What's everyone's take on singing first thing in the morning? I know it takes 2-4 hours to warm up naturally, but I sing before that.

I get up at 6:20am, and when driving to work at 7am, I sing. I do about 5 minutes of lip rolls as a warm up, then move to NAYs on an octave scale, and go into sirens or something similar. I'm usually into full on singing by 10 minutes into the drive. Is this harmful? I don't feel any pain, and it doesn't seem to be obviously harming me, but is it potentially harmful to sing out without having been up for a few hours?

Jeran: No, its not harmfull at all, as long as you do not overdo it, no more than getting on a treadmill at that time and working your way up to a run would be. A question: how does your singing at that time compare with the singing you do in the evening?

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Thank you, Steven, for the reply. My singing in the morning tends to match my singing on the way home. I don't notice any real differences, except for the first few minutes of morning singing, as I'm not warmed up, yet. As is expected, if I didn't get a good night's sleep, or am sick or vocally tired, it takes a bit longer to warm up, particularly in my head voice, but otherwise, it feels fine. I just wondered, as it's not always possible to feel when we're doing something wrong.

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Jeran, I agree totally with Steven - there's no harm as long as you listen to your own muscle messages - if you're feeling strain or pull or any sensation of tickling or coughing - then you're going to far too fast - otherwise, go for it! It shouldn't take more than fifteen to twenty minutes to warm up a voice in any case.

Just listen to your muscle messages and trust your own feedback - if it feels like something is wrong, it probably is. If it feels fine and your spoken voice doesn't alter after singing - you're probably ok. Whilst it's not always possible to feel when something is wrong, it is possible to verify signs of muscular tension during phonation - the speaking voice getting slightly husky or wobbly is always a give away.

You sound like a Speech Level Singer to me, given the exercises you're doing, in which case Liprolls are a great place to start before moving onto the nays - I would, however, recommend that if you want to use SLS (I'm not a fan personally, but it works wonderfully for some people) that you put a series of MUM just before your nay.

Enjoy!

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chanteurmoderne-

Thank you for a very informative reply. I was an SLS guy, but am a recent (within the last 6 or so months) convert to the CVT/TVS type stuff. I bought Robert's program a while back and with it, after building on what SLS built previously, I've experienced the greatest improvements, especially within the last couple of months. I feel that SLS is a good start for pop singers, and people who sing in the shower. I think something considerably more substancial is needed for a real gigging musician, especially in the rock field.

I still use the SLS exercises as a warm up, and then later in my workout, I'll use the vowel exercises (oo uh ah, ee ih ay and so on )with a very loud, twangy head voice all throughout my range. It's helped dramatically, and I feel that I'm close to the voice I've always wanted.

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I sound better in the morning and sometimes, in the afternoon. Evenings, not so much. It may have to do with the fact that when I am working, I get up around 4:30 am. So, if I am singing at 9:00 pm that night, well, I may be pushing myself past exhaustion.

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Damn Jonpall, you sound mean in the mornings! Nice work!

Personally I have to wait at least a few hours for my voice to really wake up, I can usually hit some lower notes in the morning than in the evening but if I get up at 07.00 then my tenor register stars to sound ok at around 12.00 and my voice definetly sounds best in the evening. Fortunately thats when I'm performing :)

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My voice responds better in the morning after some warmups. In the evening, I'd have whispered some song on the way to school and back and spoken, and have very atrocious speaking habits, that I haven't even thought of trying to correct before today, and those bad habits can wear my voice real quick. I tend to give a whole new dimension to the word 'whisper' :P I know how to speak better, but this goes with more volume which I kinda dread.

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Hey, Ronron, something Vendera said echos what you were saying about speaking habits. Males are prone to try and talk lower than their natural speaking voice, to sound more "manly", intimidating, tough, or just the cultural expection that men automatically talk low. That, too, can strain the voice. So, fine the natural range of one's speaking voice and let that be. A friend of ours puts out albums of bluegrass and Texas swing country. And he has a naturally high speaking voice. And more money than I have. So, who is more manly.

We're also aquaintances with Ray Wylie Hubbard. Who's speaking voice is a little lower, and so is his singing range. For those of you who don't know Hubbard, he is the actual writer of the song "Redneck Mothers" that was made a huge hit by Jerry Jeff Walker. ("It's up against the wall, you redneck mothers. Mothers who have raised you so well. He was 34 and drinking in a honky-tonk, kickin' hippies' asses and raisin' hell...")

Point being, let your speaking voice find itself and it may help to realign your body and throat to make the singing more comfortable.

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Marcus, I think it could be due to the fact that in the morning, I don't have a choice in how I do distortion - I can't do it with thick vocal folds, but since I CAN do it in the evening, I'm more prone to doing it that way - and blowing out my voice if I'm not careful. Then again, I could be totally wrong. Steven? Chanteurmoderne?

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Marcus, I think it could be due to the fact that in the morning, I don't have a choice in how I do distortion - I can't do it with thick vocal folds, but since I CAN do it in the evening, I'm more prone to doing it that way - and blowing out my voice if I'm not careful. Then again, I could be totally wrong. Steven? Chanteurmoderne?

jonpall: I don't spend much time thinking about distortions, but I agree that its wise to be careful :-) If I understand your meaning, your 'morning' voice is fairly thick-fold, but IMO that should not affect your ability to do distortion... just the pitch range at which you can phonate at all.

I'll let others who are more conversant with distortion technique guide from here....

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