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StanleyPanley

Ella Fitzgerald: This Specific Vocal Flourish

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Hello All!

New to this forum and looking forward to getting to know you all. I was wondering if anyone might be able to explain what Ella Fitzgerald is doing stylistically in certain parts of "Night and Day" (video provided). At 51 seconds, the "are" in "you are the one" and then again at 1 minute 0 secs, the second half of "under" in the line "and under the sun". 

 

I hear it a lot in Ella's recordings. It's subtle but I love the effect. Does it have something to do with using the vocal shift from chest to head voice? How does one develop that technique? 

Any help would be much appreciated !! :)

 

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One of my favorite female singers.  

If I am getting the right section from your time stamps, what I hear is skill moving in and out of her registers in conjunction with larynx height adjustments which (when lowered) lengthens her vocal tract and opens up the back of her throat all contributing to a warmer, deeper, coloring.

 Another singer who has adept at register shifts and laryngeal height skill was Jackie Wilson.

I have found to develop control of the larynx you first have to look to the tongue. You need to be able to release and gain control over the tongue. 

I'm sure others will chime in too.

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Thank you VideoHere!  I read into the anatomy of the larynx and about laryngeal height. It seems easier to reproduce the effect just knowing what's going on in there. 

 

Also the video was great! Thanks for exposing me to that recording. I like "Over the Rainbow" and I like Jackie Wilson, so I can't believe I haven't heard his version yet. It's great stuff. 

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Jackie was truly another one of those greats in terms of sheer vocal ability...where he took his voice.

He clearly was operatic at times.

Once you gain control over your larynx, (and your tongue) you gain all this vocal coloring potential that you want. Some don't advocate trying to control your larynx, but I believe you can and should (at times) when you're after a certain sound color.

 

 

 

 

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Jackie was truly another one of those greats in terms of sheer vocal ability...where he took his voice.

He clearly was operatic at times.

Once you gain control over your larynx, (and your tongue) you gain all this vocal coloring potential that you want. Some don't advocate trying to control your larynx, but I believe you can and should (at times) when you're after a certain sound color.

 

 

 

 

messing with your larynx just creates more tension. the vowel and being relaxed will keep it low if you wish without you physically trying to hold it down.

in the Ella clip is perfect example of being relaxed as Ella was and then the vowel" er" the larynx slightly drops and has an open lower throat which gives it the depth in sound

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Jackie was truly another one of those greats in terms of sheer vocal ability...where he took his voice.

He clearly was operatic at times.

Once you gain control over your larynx, (and your tongue) you gain all this vocal coloring potential that you want. Some don't advocate trying to control your larynx, but I believe you can and should (at times) when you're after a certain sound color.

 

 

 

 

Jackie Wilson is awesome. I agree there is a lot of tongue movement in his vocal style. I think of it as a vaguely Kermit sound. Jackie's cousin can get some of that timbre himself:

 

Jimmy Ruffin had quite a bit too.

 

I love character shadings like that.

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messing with your larynx just creates more tension. the vowel and being relaxed will keep it low if you wish without you physically trying to hold it down.

in the Ella clip is perfect example of being relaxed as Ella was and then the vowel" er" the larynx slightly drops and has an open lower throat which gives it the depth in sound

I can't make the vaguely Kermit sound without manipulating my tongue in a way that I'm pretty sure involves a somewhat high larynx and depressed tongue.  I'm not good at shading it into a singing voice like the above singers.

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Those Motown tunes like "Bernadette" and "I'll be there" with Levi Stubbs take a lot of energy and stamina.  if you aren't getting those notes from down below, you're finished.  You'll never make it through. You'll have a hard time finding a good all live performance.  To do this live all the way through even Levi himself struggled with it's demands.  

Just listen to this accapella vocal....crazy great.

 

 

 

 

 

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