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kentamplin

Grammy Winner Ken Tamplin Here. Bel Canto IS the only Technique

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Hi guys, for those of you that don't know me, I have 3 grammies, 14 nominations, a master's in voice and have toured the world for some of the worlds biggest rock bands.

I have developed a technique using the old Bel Canto (operetic) style of singing and firmly believe this is (in my opinion) the only true technique for maintaining great vocal health, longevity, power, range, tone, clarity and pitch.

I don't want to make any enemies here, but the proof is in the pudding.

Check out these free vocal tips I have posted on You Tube and you will see what I mean.

www.KenTamplinVocalAcademy.Com

Another thing: Though I know there are a LOT of great coaches out there, it is rare to find one that can actual sing for you and REALLY show you how to do it.

And not only that, have an understanding of what it is like to run up and down a stage, with smoke, crappy monitors, a guitar strapped around your neck (for some :-) bad food, terrible sleep, different time zones coming off a cold and having to perform your best.

This has been my world for 25 years, and I have never sung better.

Be well Guys,

-KT

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Well then you sir are stupid:lol: There is no true technique, and claiming so is just well just read the first line again... By only using one technique you are limiting yourself, but ofcourse if one technique unlocks your voice sure youre gonna take it to heart..

Btw I added the Sir in the start because your clips is pretty good, not because im a jackass :P.

I suggest you check out Lugo's or Jaime's programs those are great and not as whimpy as Bel Canto good luck

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Well I had never heard of Ken before today...the dude can frickin' WAIL!

I gotta say, my favorite "perk" of this forum is the variety and open mindedness of the people here. I would assume we are all trying to "expand" ourselves...whether we are pushing product or not.

On a side note, while looking at Ken's videos, I thought of VIDEOHERE and his desire to nail down that Lou Gramm sound. Think this guy has a handle on that...in a very healthy way("Fooled Around and Fell in Love cover.) NOTHIN' wimpy about those sounds(to me.)

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Ken, what little I know about your technique at this point, at least from your videos indicates that your probably a great voice teacher. I liked your bridged siren for example... it was very similar to what I do when I bridge and connect in the head voice and thus... teach my students. I just cant say that bridging the passagio, and connecting with twangy laryngeal configurations is Bel Canto... its far more contemporary, which is a beautiful thing... I have found there are many good and some great techniques for training a voice. And some voices require different techniques. The voice can be trained in different ways to make different kinds of sounds, depending on the artist requirements.

In my opinion, there are many "true" voice techniques. "True" is defined by the results... there are many very effective voice teachers here on TMV, you are one of them Ill assume... and if they are getting results and clients are happy, I would have to say, thats a "true" voice technique.

Its great to have you here Ken... folks, check out Kens bio, very impressive.

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Well im not talking about Ken's sound or ideal when i stated Bel canto was wimpy, but if you compare the Bel canto program to Lugo's or Jaime's...

Ofc he can wail it sounds very good actualy!But it does not sound as good as you would expekt if this was the only "true" technique... I think Robert puts this out in a better way than me, just whine ignore my whinyposts :rolleyes: and read his instead :P

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Saying that Bel Canto is whimpy is pure ignorance. I'll put you in a room with a classical trained bel canto opera singer and he'll make your ears bleed, that's how whimpy it is. Furthermore, Bel Canto is fashionable word these days, everyone seems to use it, I don't think sir Ken is using just that, allthough he is using several principles out of it. [open throat, vowels, ...]

Another point I'd like to make is that not everyone who is a great singer is a great teacher. I'm not saying Ken is not a great teacher, I'm only saying, if every singer who had a perfectly connected voice and sang very well would be a great teacher, I think all vocal coaches are out of a job. I know of some teachers, who allthough they themselves might have some things in their voice that makes me think hmm, they infact have superfine earing and diagnostic skills combined with good people-judging skills who are excellent coaches.

Then I have met some people who are as good a singer as Ken, while they were teaching stuff that was totally absurd, and just repeated a pattern of exercises for each person, rather then listening to the voice, diagnosing and making stuff just for that voice.

"I just cant say that bridging the passagio, and connecting with twangy laryngeal configurations is Bel Canto... its far more contemporary, which is a beautiful thing"

I gotta disagree here Robert. Everyone sings with twang, in different degrees, and classical Bel Canto singers actually with a fair amount, and briding the passagio, through the use of sirens, is sth they have done for ages.

What I would agree on, and what I believe you're trying to say, is the position of the larynx is usually lower in Bel Canto or Modern Bel Canto variants. With more research available, people started discover singing with an elevated larynx was an option too, this is very contempory, and I'm sure part of what you teach.

"There are many "true" voice techniques. "True" is defined by the results"

I agree fullheartedly. I have given you a rep point for this :>

Every singer should find their own way, and sometimes one coach or one approach might work beter for you then for me. For example with me, I need to know that people don't pull an exercise out of their behind, that there is some kind of science behind it, once I get how that works, the exercise becomes 10x more effective for me.

Others would say, I don't wanna know all that stuff, just give me an exercise that works :P

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I agree with the critics. Who is most likely the best teacher? It will likely be someone who started out with a very bad voice and learned to overcome all kinds of difficulties to become a good or excellent singer. Not someone who had a good voice to begin with.

According to Plato, the best physician is one who was sickly as a child, and experienced all kinds of infirmities. The best restorer of voice will likely be someone who initially had a bad voice.

This isn't necessarily the best technique of voice to sing--restoring the natural voice (though I think it is). However, one should, in my opinion, restore one's natural voice before training on more advanced techniques. And for that reason, the best initial instructions is likely from an instructor who overcame his own difficulties first--a bad voice initially.

Who are the students for Elvis and Pavarotti?

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Whoah, Ken. I have never heard of you, but I'm really hoping you'll stick around. It's great to hear a vocal coach who can sing their ass off.

Your intro video on youtube is awesome, I didn't really care much for the siren at the start, but from 11 secs in, wow. Soul!

Finally, a teacher who doesn't sound like a Spinal Tap reject. If you can sing like that, then I for one will listen to what you have to say.

I've become disillusioned by forums of late. I recently actually listened to some samples of a contributor's singing and almost died, it sounded like a very bad karaoke performance.

I've been to several singing teachers over the years and didn't stick with them because they didn't have a voice that I find listenable. Most are so concerned with technique that they forget about conveying emotion in a pure, honest way. I have not been able to find a coach who has a voice that could sell records, but you my friend, have a gift and if you know how to explain what it is that allows you to connect your emotions to what comes out your mouth like that, then sign me up.

You can call it Bel Canto, you can call it Speech level Isolation Pillar Blah Blah, but please, stick around and contribute to this forum. I want to learn from you.

Rick

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I recently actually listened to some samples of a contributor's singing and almost died, it sounded like a very bad karaoke performance.

I am surprised, I don't know who you mean. It doesn't mater... For example I listened some James Lugo's clips, have his course and I'm sure that he is good singer and based on his DVD/CD good teacher also.

Once I thought that good singer means good teacher but now I think that it is not important how the teacher sings but how he/she teaches, understands voice production process and whether he can explain that to students.

I like Ken's singing. He sounds very well, but I do not like how he presented himself on this forum. :( Anyway, I hope he will share his knowledge on this forum and hope we can learn from him :)

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I actually do know who he means I've heared quite a few of them too, but I don't wanna hurt anyone's feelings, beside that I don't think because someone's voice isn't super that they can't be having a great ear, great diagnostic skills, or won't have the ability to teach you :>

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That's right, it doesn't matter. Mr James Lugo is amazing, I hope to get his DVD soon. I haven't actually heard Jaime Vandera sing a song but his exercises in his book are helping me a lot. Rob Lunte's online examples are a bit 80's metal for me but he seems to know what he's talking about and is a great communicator as well.

I had to dig a bit deeper online to find the examples I was talking about and I'm not about to divulge.

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Elrathion am i completly out of the park here or wasnt bel canto back in the days mostly used and taught to lighter voiced tenors?

And that they had much lighter voices than for an example dramatic or heldentenor voices? I know much of the sls and ss is based of bel canto, but it would be great if you could point out if this is just some rumour ive hold on to. :P

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Bel Canto has been going around for some centuries (originated supposedly in the 17th century). It has had it's appearances and disapearences. It deffinatly didn't get tought to one voice type or the other, it just happens to be that tenors are usually the most know to the layman. If I ask you to give me some of your favourite opera singers, how many would turn out not to be tenor? (provided you don't follow the opera scene that well :>)

What is true though, is that there was a deffinate sound ideal, which we can find till today in Bel Canto teaching and derivates. They also advocated a less muscled approach to singing.

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Ok then I get it, sorry if i made you mad because of my lack of knowledge, btw my favourite Opera singer is Peter mattei a baritone from sweden. He's got a very crazy voice, im not realy into opera but hearing him makes you proud youre a baritone

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like i said in the comments of Kens blog i can see/hear many things that are similar to what i study in SLS. there are some differences as well but when you consider that what Ken is teaching and what SLS does is based on bel canto its not so much of a surprise that there are many similarities

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Hang on fellas... Im simply trying to say that Bel Canto is fairly more Classical approach, wouldnt you say? I really liked Ken's videos and was only trying to say that he seemed to be making more contemporary sounds then Classical. Ken, it is great to have you here and I look forward to getting to know and chatting soon...

Fellas, It is true that you dont have to sing like Barbara Streisand to teach people how to sing. And its not about how great or just ok... the teacher is as a singer, its about leading by example and getting out there and doing it. Its about putting your self on the line and taking a little risk that demonstrates and inspires people. Also understand, you can watch someone sing and clearly get the point that they are amazing, but production values may be mediocre. Lastly, make sure that you are pursuing your artistic and performance endeavors as well. Jump in the boat and start paddling with the rest of us ... dont stand on the sidelines. As much as you can...

Yes, Ive heard there are a lot of similarities in SLS and Bel Canto, that essentially, the old Italian Bel Canto techniques are a large part of Seth Rigg's foundation.

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Funny, the "80s" thing... I fear sometimes people associate high velocity screams in the head voice with the ever so slightest vibrato as suddenly being "80s"... what is "80s"?... Oh, was that the period in metal when male vocalists had trained techniques, put a value on clean, operatic phonation and had range before the chest pullin, constricted grunge era?... Or is it a vocal sound that is appreciated greatly in the European metal scene, but seems to be mired in as a lost art form in North American because 12 year olds dont think its cool if its not "cookie"? ... range, power, vibrato are essential to the vocal aesthetic that registers to the ear, "wow, that is great"..., be it progressive metal singers or operatic singers....Lastly, any well trained singer is perfectly capable of crooning in lower chest voice ike Frank Sinatra, Elton John, Jazz Singers and can learn to extreme screamer with a little practice...

Speaking for myself, I choose to sing things that are hard. That is what singing is about for me many times. Its about making extreme vocal sounds, not just cruising in chest voice all the time ... Having said that, I think Ill record some "Seal" dance-like direction, or something more croony in the coming year to demonstrate other things...

Thanks for the compliment on being a good communicator...

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as far as i know the old bel canto singing sounded very different than what many people consider to be a opera/classical sound now days-the real overly dark, affected or kermit sounds. and like i think Elrathion said alot of people use the label bel canto these days when its not.

for an example of a more natural sounding operatic sound check out juan diego florez

without any stylizing added the adapted bel canto principles generally give a sound that is similar to your speaking voice just on different pitches. whether your consider you speaking voice tone contemporary or not is a matter of opinion :P

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I'd like to say that all techniques have value! Bel Canto has always been seen as the ultimate singing in the classical world and has taught many fine singers. Contemporary teaching is working at relaxing style a lot more but has come from a classical base and is adapting the techniques. Vocal Freedom comes from a combination of good use of vowel sounds, breath and emotion, and refined technique.

A good teacher...yes focus's on teaching, hearing, diagnosing and freeing a students voice. A singer who wants to make it to the top focus's on their singing. At some point they may decide to teach like Ken is now doing and will make another contribution that way.

A student will go to who they need and a teacher will get the student they also need...that's how it works in all of life. Each student will learn something from the expereince and may need several teachers for them to find their true voice.

The voice is unique to the individual and the teacher who facilitates that and allows the student to accept their own voice is the teacher with skill and wisdom.

The student who practises, refines and free's their voice and gets on with singing is the student who feels and hears the reward in their voice.

There are some of the worlds best on TMV and all teachers and singers have a part to play in our community! Hence Bel Canto is amongst the great teachings but it doesn't hold all the answers as it is still one technique! love Hilary :rolleyes:

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I'd like to say that all techniques have value! Bel Canto has always been seen as the ultimate singing in the classical world and has taught many fine singers. Contemporary teaching is working at relaxing style a lot more but has come from a classical base and is adapting the techniques. Vocal Freedom comes from a combination of good use of vowel sounds, breath and emotion, and refined technique.

A good teacher...yes focus's on teaching, hearing, diagnosing and freeing a students voice. A singer who wants to make it to the top focus's on their singing. At some point they may decide to teach like Ken is now doing and will make another contribution that way.

A student will go to who they need and a teacher will get the student they also need...that's how it works in all of life. Each student will learn something from the expereince and may need several teachers for them to find their true voice.

The voice is unique to the individual and the teacher who facilitates that and allows the student to accept their own voice is the teacher with skill and wisdom.

The student who practises, refines and free's their voice and gets on with singing is the student who feels and hears the reward in their voice.

There are some of the worlds best on TMV and all teachers and singers have a part to play in our community! .. Hence Bel Canto is amongst the great teachings but it doesn't hold all the answers as it is still one technique! love Hilary :rolleyes:

Hence Bel Canto is amongst the great teachings but it doesn't hold all the answers as it is still one technique!... And thats all she wrote,... precisely Hil.

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Regarding Bel Canto, here is a book I read that I found to be very interesting. Its called, "Bel Canto : The Essence of Vocal Art" by Vernon Mackie. It discusses the history of Bel Canto and provides some teasing insights to twang before it was fully understood. Here is a link to my site with other recommended books.

http://www.thevocaliststudio.com/#/books/4522094174

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Rob...I'm 100% with you...and I'm sure people here just misunderstood Ken..

I mean...Ken just said...that a vocal coach who never toured, sang on stage, recorded in the studio can be a real deal.

I have spent my whole life recording, touring, teaching, studying, performing and trying to improve my art . I know my value as a teacher of EXPERIENCE...that's what Ken is trying to say in his presentation...don't take it as a BOYS, I'M THE ULTIMATE TEACHER ALL AROUND!!!...he just told us what he did and what was his path to his present. Ken is an artist I admire and know.

But what I don't think it's right is to say that Bel Canto is the TRUE technique...Ken, what you do in the first sirens is something that in Bel Canto is taught so late...not in the beginning...just because before bridging the passagio in Opera you work months and months on the projection and the sound. That said in Bel Canto (and for Bel Canto I mean only ITALIAN classical singing----Wagner isn't Bel Canto AT ALL) singing in pharyngeal voice (what my buddy Robert Lunte calls twang) is just an optional..I mean...the repertoire here and there has some high F's in pure pharyngeal posture...but Bel Canto is not THAT kind of sound..Bel Canto has it's climax in tenor high C's in pure chest voice...(the nessun dorma one)..the famous DO DI PETTO (Litterally chest C ;-)).....

That's what Rob is trying to say...

About the 80's thing..well..as an associate TVS teacher I talked with Robert so many times about how TVS bridgin'n'connecting technique can be produced in soul, blues, funky, rock..and not only in metal...take a listen to my version of people get ready...at the end of the song I do some high A's in pure TWANGY pharyngeal voice...that IS TVS...I did Bel Canto..I DID IT...

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Hey Ken,

I love you singing, and your website is awesome, but you're not listed in the listing of Grammy Winners. Can you tell us what songs you won the Grammy's for?

-Bill

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It's Funny, I wasn't looking to piss people off (Jen), I said "In my experience".

I'm not sure how you could possibly pit James Lugo /Jamie against people like Dr. David Kyle, Ron Anderson, Justin Thomas, Billimi Canana, Dimitri Astanov or a number of Italian instructors.

-Ken

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Hi Bill,

Here is an exact list of the awards you asked about with years and class qualifications:

1987 Grammy Award for the Rock Group “SHOUT” for Best Christian Metal Album

1988 Grammy Award for Best Christian Rock Male Vocalist

1989 Grammy Award for Best Recorded Christian Rock/Metal Album

Here are the Dove Awards (kind of like Gospel Grammies) as well for the Gospel Music Association in the following categories:

1994 Dove Award for Best Heavy Metal Songs: "Dancing on a Volcano" & "Testify"

1989 Dove Award for Best Heavy Metal Album: Shout / In Your Face

1989 Dove Award for Best Heavy Metal Song: Shout / "Give Me An Answer"

NOMINATIONS

1996 Dove Award Nomination for Best Metal/Hard Rock Album In the Witness Box

1996 Dove Award Nomination for Best Metal/Hard Rock Song "Death By Inches”

1995 Dove Award Nomination for Best Metal/Hard Rock Song "In the Lap of Legends"Dove Award Nomination for Best Metal/Hard Rock Song "Dancing On A Volcano"Dove Award Nomination for Best Metal/Hard Recorded Song "Testify"Dove Award Nomination for Best Metal/Hard Album Of The Year "Tamplin"

1994 Dove Award Nomination for Best Metal/Hard Rock Album Tamplin

1992 Dove Award Nomination for Best Metal/Hard Rock Album Magdallan / Big Bang

1991 Dove Award Nomination for Best Metal/Hard Rock Album An Axe To Grind

1988 Dove Award Nomination for Best Metal/Hard Rock Song Shout / "It Won't Be Long"

1988 Dove Award Nomination for Best Metal/Hard Rock Song Shout / "Shout"

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