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I'm a male who has been singing in falsetto almost their whole life. Of course I do sing in chest but I find singing in falsetto more comfortable. So today I was practising and I suddenly had this idea to try singing Emotions by Mariah Carey, so I listened to the song several times to get to understand it better and I was really intrigued with the Whistling parts of the song. So instead of trying to sing then song, I tried finding my whistle register but I was only singing in falsetto the whole time, until I breathed out in between singing and I made a squeak. So I tried focusing on the feeling and I was able tooit very high notes, higher than I thought I could hit. I was concerned whether it was just a really high falsetto but it felt slightly different than a falsetto, instead of feeling the sound coming out from my throat, I could feel vibrations in my head and the sound seemed to be coming from in between the back of my nose and mouth. I was pretty happy with the sound of it so I this time I actually tried singing the song, it sounded okay until I reached the whistling before then chorus and instead of the smooth high sound coming out, a weird falsetto came out instead. After that I went and read about the whistle register and I came upon one where the author of the page talked about how whistling with the wrong technique will damage your voice. I was instantly worried so I came here looking for tips on singing with the whistle register. How do I know I'm actually singing in my whistle register and how to incorporate it into my singing. Thanks im advance !

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Well, I was trained in Bel Canto by a lyric coloratura soprano, and she was under the impression that all voices must access the flageolet in order to be able to have a "well-oiled machine of an instrument." This was the motif that she often wanted repeated. Of course, daily phonation exercises in the whistle register has been associated with an average gain of 4.3 semitones to voices which haven't been able to access it previously. The whistle register is sometimes considered an extension of the head register, and unlike falsetto for males, the production should be in the nasal cavity.

Transition into voce di campanello (whistle register) occurs over several semitones depending upon the vocal type and weight: Eb5-D6 (622hz - 1175hz). B5 (988hz) are where pitches and tones are considered and perceived as whistle register.

There is an overlap range as much as an octave C5-C6 where singers (regardless of vocal expertise) could use or choose to produce tones using head register (falsetto) or whistle register depending upon desired vocal quality. Whistle register phonation should not be considered as a marginal type of voice production found only in a few singers at extreme pitches. Some subjects show an overlap range in which they are able to sustain pitches in both head and whistle.

Generous breath support is essential for flageolet. Air should leak through the nose and not the mouth whenever attempting to produce pitches in areas that are generally considered whistle territory.

Many pedagogues vehemently believed in the practice and extension of whistle register as a tool for gaining upper extension, and that isn't limited to sopranos alone. Perhaps this is, in some way, useful.

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On 12/12/2015 at 3:37 AM, K. Mc said:

Well, I was trained in Bel Canto by a lyric coloratura soprano, and she was under the impression that all voices must access the flageolet in order to be able to have a "well-oiled machine of an instrument." This was the motif that she often wanted repeated. Of course, daily phonation exercises in the whistle register has been associated with an average gain of 4.3 semitones to voices which haven't been able to access it previously. The whistle register is sometimes considered an extension of the head register, and unlike falsetto for males, the production should be in the nasal cavity.

Transition into voce di campanello (whistle register) occurs over several semitones depending upon the vocal type and weight: Eb5-D6 (622hz - 1175hz). B5 (988hz) are where pitches and tones are considered and perceived as whistle register.

There is an overlap range as much as an octave C5-C6 where singers (regardless of vocal expertise) could use or choose to produce tones using head register (falsetto) or whistle register depending upon desired vocal quality. Whistle register phonation should not be considered as a marginal type of voice production found only in a few singers at extreme pitches. Some subjects show an overlap range in which they are able to sustain pitches in both head and whistle.

Generous breath support is essential for flageolet. Air should leak through the nose and not the mouth whenever attempting to produce pitches in areas that are generally considered whistle territory.

Many pedagogues vehemently believed in the practice and extension of whistle register as a tool for gaining upper extension, and that isn't limited to sopranos alone. Perhaps this is, in some way, useful.

I  have to say, I think you might be right about that. I started practicing whistle register access, every day, since 3 weeks ago. Before then, My range had been stuck at G#5, for a while. I could barely get out a faint A5. The other day, I happened to try it, and it had some strength. I was surprised. I did it again and again.

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Yes! Work! Soon you will be able to extend that. Promise it works. Most people don't practice this area because there aren't many pieces of musical literature that call for pitches beyond F6, in Opera that is.

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9 hours ago, K. Mc said:

Yes! Work! Soon you will be able to extend that. Promise it works. Most people don't practice this area because there aren't many pieces of musical literature that call for pitches beyond F6, in Opera that is.

It's great that my favorite singers are people that happen to be able to use this. I wouldn't have found this out until later on.

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I wasn't allowed to listen to anything other than classical music until I was seventeen and when I discovered like Aretha Franklin, B.B. King, Etta James, John Coltrane, Mariah Carey, Minnie Ripperton, Nina Simone, etc I just knew that there was a place to really apply it outside of classical. In fact, CCM has more applications of it than classical.

I can make you a document or something of the exercises we had to practice. My flageolet starts at about A5 and extends to A7 on a good day. Typically, if I am not warmed up I can get to about F7 to G7.

I just think it is a shame that there is not as much information about it as there are other register productions and phonations. 

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1 minute ago, K. Mc said:

I wasn't allowed to listen to anything other than classical music until I was seventeen and when I discovered like Aretha Franklin, B.B. King, Etta James, John Coltrane, Mariah Carey, Minnie Ripperton, Nina Simone, etc I just knew that there was a place to really apply it outside of classical. In fact, CCM has more applications of it than classical.

I can make you a document or something of the exercises we had to practice. My flageolet starts at about A5 and extends to A7 on a good day. Typically, if I am not warmed up I can get to about F7 to G7.

I just think it is a shame that there is not as much information about it as there are other register productions and phonations. 

I would actually love that, if it's not much trouble for you! Mine starts in about about E5. My falsetto tops out at G#5 (Now I can say A5). I've gone as high as E6 with flageolet though.

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