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Ed M

Songs where the vocal melody peaks at C5

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4 hours ago, Ed M said:

VideoHere is trying to kill me! LOL :P

 

WOW! Thanks for the GREAT RESPONSE, guys!!!!!! :D:D:D

Much appreciated.!!! :)

 

When I get some time, I will check out all of these songs and begin adding them to the list. ;)

 

 

 

Yeah, that's the stratospheric zone I forgot about in that tune....lol!!  But get those other notes down, because they will carve you into your C5 eventually. 

Some more great tunes to work on...You younger guys may not have much knowledge of this guy, but he rates very high on Digital Dream Door as one of the all-time best.

 

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Sure wish I was one of those young guys! LOL :P But unfortunately, I got started pretty late, I started hitting the karaoke bars and playing in various garage bands when I was around 31 and now I'm the ripe old age of 45. LOL And I absolutely agree with you about the other notes. ;) But, I've always been able to hit those notes since I first started singing, at least to some extent. Heehee The first song I ever sang in public was my favorite Bob Seger song, TURN THE PAGE, and I believe that has a nice B4 at the end of it which at the time was perfect for me cuz I didn't have to hold it out for very long and it didn't have to be soft and pretty. LOL :P I can sing soft and I can sing high, but I can't sing soft and high at the same time. LOL Eventually I was able to hit and hold out the B4 for quite some time and I even demonstrate that in my latest original. :) 

Yes, I know the pitch is not flawless. Heehee And I know I still need to work on my voice in regards to working the nasal out of my voice and using my chest voice more than my head voice. Heehee And my number 1 nemesis ever since I joined my first band has been timing. Doh! I blame that on too much Karaoke. LOL :P But I keep working on it, and that's why forums like these are so good for aspiring singers. :) 

 

Anyway, thanks for all the great suggestions, VideoHere. :) BTW...Are you sure the Burton Cummings song doesn't peak at a B4? Heehee That's what THE RANGE PLACE said. :P

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Ed, I'm 62. :) Still learning, experimenting, studying......

Just trying to get you to not be so concerned with C5 in and of itself or any note in and of itself.

I found when you get the G4 to B4 range solid, strong and all the other adjectives that go with it, consistent, accurate, tuned, variably powerful, whatever, your C5 "appears" or "makes itself known to you" or becomes "available."  Try to divorce yourself from thinking of as a note go up to, but more as one that becomes more and more available to you.  You basically have to tune to it.

Hope I've helped

 

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Thanks for the advice, VideoHere. :) I think you hit the nail on the head. :) I'm not really that concerned about it, it's just fun to be able to sing songs that short of transposing down, didn't used to be available to me. ;) The same thing can be said about the C2. After all this time, I can finally sing a strong C2, especially if I do it shortly after I wake up in the morning. Heehee And yes, I will probably eventually make another thread like this for the C2 because I'm very interested in working out that part of my voice too. :) I've had very little luck googling these subjects so I greatly appreciate all the helpful suggestions from you and everyone who has posted. :D:):D BTW...I love singing the notes G4-B4! :D Heehee The only thing that really vexes me sometimes is the vowel sounds, Seems like some are more comfortable than others even though I'm singing the exact same note. Heehee

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Yeah, intense and high EEs are tough for most people, but once you get them down, be sure that the rest of your voice will be a lot stronger. I love training loud OOs and EEs on the F4-B4 range, it makes the transitions a lot stronger. Be sure to try that, man!

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4 hours ago, Xamedhi said:

Yeah, intense and high EEs are tough for most people, but once you get them down, be sure that the rest of your voice will be a lot stronger. I love training loud OOs and EEs on the F4-B4 range, it makes the transitions a lot stronger. Be sure to try that, man!

I've found that shading the EE more towards an "ih" as in the English word "sit" works really well as a vowel mod to move past the second resonance shift (A4-B4 area). EE is too forward for me to smoothly transition into head voice.

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I do the EE very vertically. From a very neutral position, and it varies in horizontal wideness depending on the song and the tone required, but generally it's like this:   ( please forgive the face, lol )
 

 

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Interesting! :D Thanks for the input, Jabroni and Xamedhi! :D

 

The head tilt reminds me of how I seem to be able to sing higher if I have my head tilted sightly upward. Heehee

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Yeah, head tilting, in any direction seems to be influencial to me, depending on range, note, vowel, etc.  We are all asymmetric, in structure, muscle tensions, ligament length...its really impossible to be perfect, hahaha, so it makes sense to me that I feel that way.
 

For example, In my lower range, I find it very difficult to sing looking to the left, I feel like my larynx doesn't anchor correctly, and this feeling lessens on the mid and high range, but is always present in some degree. Also when I swallow and keep the coordination still, with the larynx hiding up there, I cannot look to the left side, I feel like there is something being trapped, like a ligament or something and if I do my larynx feels very weird. If I tilt my head with my right rear to the right shoulder and THEN swallow, I can then put my head straight and look to the left with just a sliight weird feeling. 
I think this could be related to my vocal gap in some way, because when I have a bad day my left side of the larynx starts feeling "pressed by a finger" if I sing too intensely. This does not happen at all in a good day when I feel my fold closure is cool.  I've been training to be able to keep my head looking forward, just modifying slightly the height of my chin with a neutral face. This seems to work well, and frees my voice up.  So even if at first it's difficult it's very important.


I must add, I'm a ballet dancer, so I am constantly exposed to a lot of tensions on the shoulders, scapula elevators, trapezius and all that stuff.

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On 3/2/2016 at 5:10 PM, Ed M said:

Thanks for the advice, VideoHere. :) I think you hit the nail on the head. :) I'm not really that concerned about it, it's just fun to be able to sing songs that short of transposing down, didn't used to be available to me. ;) The same thing can be said about the C2. After all this time, I can finally sing a strong C2, especially if I do it shortly after I wake up in the morning. Heehee And yes, I will probably eventually make another thread like this for the C2 because I'm very interested in working out that part of my voice too. :) I've had very little luck googling these subjects so I greatly appreciate all the helpful suggestions from you and everyone who has posted. :D:):D BTW...I love singing the notes G4-B4! :D Heehee The only thing that really vexes me sometimes is the vowel sounds, Seems like some are more comfortable than others even though I'm singing the exact same note. Heehee

My pleasure Ed.:)  Shading or learning to modify vowels (that are correct for your particular voice) takes a long time to master.

That's another thing in vocal study that is generally counterintuitive and the adjustments can be so subtle that you're better off "thinking them in" rather than making a physical, mechanical adjustment.

Bob

 

 

 

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Thats so true Bob. Sometimes only thinking of doing something with the vocal tract gets the result haha  

Also, finding the right vowels for your voice and body is indeed so so important

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Good to know, Bob! :) I'll definitely keep that in mind. :D And I should probably do more vowel exercises like Xamedhi suggested. Heehee

BTW, Xamedhi, can I call you Seba? It's so much easier to type! LOL Big thanks for the Encouraging words on Dawn Of Freedom on my Songwriting partners Soundcloud page. :D:):D

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20 minutes ago, Ed M said:

Good to know, Bob! :) I'll definitely keep that in mind. :D And I should probably do more vowel exercises like Xamedhi suggested. Heehee

BTW, Xamedhi, can I call you Seba? It's so much easier to type! LOL Big thanks for the Encouraging words on Dawn Of Freedom on my Songwriting partners Soundcloud page. :D:):D

Yes, sure!  hahah  My real name is Sebastian :)   

I have found that a lot of my issues with the vocal gap I have, have corrected greatly when I started training more "closed vowels" like OO, with great intensity, and now that my voice is stronger on EE too, but not small forward EEs, darker and more vertical, with more lower overtones. I can get a lot more power on them, in fact they are close in volume to my AHs in the F4-A4 range, and due to the frequencies they stand out more in the mix! Which is so cool haha.  Check this demo I kind of improvised for a band, on the two choruses ( "Illusion, confusion..." ) when I sustain the G#4 "MEEE"s     

1:45 and 2:47
 



 

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