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Rock Singers Mixed Voice

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DarkSlash
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In Brett Manning's Mastering the Mix there're different kinds of mix...

so, according to that, what kind of mix do you thing that have this Rock singers???

-Axl Rose

-Steven Tyler

-Robert Plant

-Myles Kennedy (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_bks95OpMgQ)

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The "mix", especially the various subcategories of mix, is something that's found only in the world of Speech Level Singing or Singing Success. Can you refresh our memories on what these mixes are and give a brief description of each?

In CVT terms I think that all of those guys sing a lot of twangy curbing (they "cover" into the Uh, I and O vowels with medium (and slightly above) volume, use a slight "hold" to their voice - and twang a lot), and they use distortion - Axl probably uses the most distortion out of these 4 guys, then comes Steven, then Robert and finally Myles with the least amount of distortion.

If I remember correctly, they'd be using what SLS calls pharengeal mix but like I said, please list the mixes for use and describe them! :)

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In Brett Manning's Mastering the Mix there're different kinds of mix...

so, according to that, what kind of mix do you thing that have this Rock singers???

-Axl Rose

-Steven Tyler

-Robert Plant

-Myles Kennedy (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_bks95OpMgQ)

maybe it's me, but the term "mixed voice" just dosen't sit right with me.

actually, i'm starting to feel like there really aren't quote, unquote "registers" anymore....

there are low notes and high notes. i really don't feel breaks points anymore...transitions "yes" adjustments "yes."

and god knows there's plenty of work to do, but now it seems like all the notes are sitting at mouth level and above.

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maybe it's me, but the term "mixed voice" just dosen't sit right with me.

actually, i'm starting to feel like there really aren't quote, unquote "registers" anymore....

there are low notes and high notes. i really don't feel breaks points anymore...transitions "yes" adjustments "yes."

and god knows there's plenty of work to do, but now it seems like all the notes are sitting at mouth level and above.

Bob, transitions and adjustments are just what other people use to distinguish 'registers'. :-) Its all in how a person thinks about things, and attaches terms to the various aspects of what they hear. Don't worry about it.

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Well, I am the resident Guns and Roses fan. Axl Rose doesn't use much mixed voice until the album Chinese Democracy. Even then, it is sparing. Mostly, twanged head voice with a cackle. And bass, in chest tones. I think this comes from the fact that he usually sang bass before Hollywood Rose and preferred that. That crazy buzzsaw sound that he gets was a "funny" voice for him and original drummer Rob Gardner convinced him to keep doing that.

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Alter Bridge is a modern hard rock band whereas those others are classic/heavy metal. Myles has quite a different sound to these classic singers. The other singers tend to use very twanged head voice tones and belts, whereas modern rock singers like Myles generally use more of the lower chesty "conversational" stuff up to the twangy belts with distortion and then use cleaner head tones for contrast. But hell what I think, all truly exceptional singers.

I don't think that using the term "mixed voice" is very helpful when describing rock singers. It is fantastic for pop and "conventional" singers and Brett has nailed that, but I think it definitely breaks down for rock music.

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Mixed voice is pretty much identical to what CVT calls curbing and I've heard several reliable CVT singers/coaches say that Steven Tyler uses mostly curbing on those big choruses of his, but metal like neutral on the extremely high screams. I think that both Axl Rose and Brian Johnson used mixed voice in their prime (Appetite for destruction and Back in black) but as they got more worn from touring they fell into the metal like neutral style for even the low head tones.

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Wow! What a great replies!

I think I should learn about "twanged" sound...

By the way... what it means CVT?

DarkSlash: It comes from the title of a book (Complete Vocal Technique) by Catherine Sadolin, and has become a shorthand for the pedagogy described in the book, and promoted by the Complete Vocal Institute, the research group that she assembled.

Some of our members are quite conversant with the terminologies that CVT uses, and that's why it shows up in our dialogues. For myself, as a classically-trained singer, it took a while to understand the sounds which went with the various CVT terms. I am still learning it ;)

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DarkSlash: It comes from the title of a book (Complete Vocal Technique) by Catherine Sadolin, and has become a shorthand for the pedagogy described in the book, and promoted by the Complete Vocal Institute, the research group that she assembled.

Some of our members are quite conversant with the terminologies that CVT uses, and that's why it shows up in our dialogues. For myself, as a classically-trained singer, it took a while to understand the sounds which went with the various CVT terms. I am still learning it ;)

steve, you're not alone...one part of me wants to learn them, and the other says sing from the heart and let the emotion and note dictate the mode.

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steve, you're not alone...one part of me wants to learn them, and the other says sing from the heart and let the emotion and note dictate the mode.

That's actually what the CVT people say - let the emotion dictate the mode. That being said, I'm still not 100% sold on those modes of theirs but they have helped me a lot. According to CVT, the most healthy way to sing is to be in the "center" of any one of the 4 modes (neutral, curbing, overdrive and edge), but at the moment I have to disagree with that a bit because if you're travelling up in pitch and about to bridge from overdrive to curbing, f.ex., then there comes a point in your range where it's probably best to have a bit of overdrive and a bit of curbing - i.e. to let the transition happen gradually and continously instead of abruptly at some particular note in the scale.

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When CVT talks about the most healthy way it doesn't mean that doing something different is going destroy your voice. Being in the center of the modes is more as a good guideline for achieving a sound with the most efficiency. The easiest way to sing and singing with the sound you want is not always synonymous sadly. :) However doing transitions between the modes without having a big sudden change of tone is shown in the CVT library. There is also a chapter to this that you should check out jonpall. It's on page 131 in the swedish version, you probebly have it somewhere close in your language.

Cheers

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