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vibraaaato

bridging (mixed register, head voice..)

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Different people call it differently: head voice, bridging, mixed register, compressed falsetto, laryngeal tilt.. They all mean the same thing right? Singing the range of one's falsetto but sounding more full like chest voice, and does not crack going from low notes to high notes.

My instructor can do this. I cannot. He said to practice singing falsetto louder and going to lower notes. I've been doing that for days, but I don't feel any improvement, other than my falsetto getting louder. I still crack going from chest to falsetto, and the falsetto still doesn't sound full.

There are dozens of video on youtube explaining how to do this. They demonstrate before and after. But I want to know what it's like in-between, so I know if I'm making progress.

Is this technique something you gradually master, i.e. the crack becomes less and less obvious and the falsetto sounding more and more full, or is it a sudden revelation type of technique, where you practice without improvement for a while but wake up one day and suddenly you can do it?

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the way it worked for me was this. for years I sang in chest voice and in falsetto. That was all I knew. So I could NOT "bridge". I didnt really have a "head voice" so in essence there was nothing for me to bridge TO. When I tried to sing higher notes I either choked or I flipped/cracked over into falsetto.

Eventually I got tired of choking so I reasoned that I was going to have to try to feel the note and resonance somewhere ELSE besides the throat. So as soon as I started feeling the note up on my hard palate, I had a head voice. The minute I had a head voice I could bridge up or down, no problem.

So for me there was no "I sorta got it" or "it's getting better". For me it was just a light switch that went on once I started feeling a proper head voice

AFAIK at my current level of knowledge, the falsetto wont connect straight to the chest voice. There is more than one bridge. There is a higher bridge above the one that goes from chest to head voice. That higher bridge going into the falsetto I havent quite mastered yet

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1 hour ago, vibraaaato said:

Is this technique something you gradually master, i.e. the crack becomes less and less obvious and the falsetto sounding more and more full, or is it a sudden revelation type of technique, where you practice without improvement for a while but wake up one day and suddenly you can do it?

Yes.

 

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"I've been doing that for days, but I don't feel any improvement."

Be realistic. It takes time.

The falsetto voice (meaning the partial or voice with no true vocal fold closure) WILL NOT turn into your full, adducted head voice you desire.  Yes, you can absolutely strengthen your falsetto, but you still have to learn to connect and stay connected

That full voice voice comes from training.  A lot of it.  

 

 

 

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It's frustrating.  Yes, making the falsetto louder is one  way, but just practicing the same thing over and over may not get you there.  (BTW making falsetto louder didn't work for me at the beginning)  You need a victory to show yourself that you can actually do it.  Here are a couple you can try:

1) Yawning.  Make yourself yawn and vocalize through it.  You should find it very easy to go from low to high (or high to low) during a yawn.

2) NG - try a siren low to high while vocalizing on an NG.  Try the lightest NG at first.  If you succeed try a little louder.

Now those two are not "singing" but at least you can get the sensation and prove to yourself that it is possible.

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Try backing off in volume and pressure around the breaking point, and then coming back into normal volume. This helps get the muscle movement under control and more smooth. You'll be tempted to simply add a lot more volume, which makes you belt, and seems to make the higher notes easier to sing with a full tone. However, it also strains your voice. Even if you're able to relax into the volume at first, the tension will slowly build up until you're too tired to hit those notes - that is, if you don't injure yourself first.

The two things gno mentioned above work great. I also add "neeyah" going up one note at a time, the "n" can be a great onset, and the "ee" helps place the voice on the hard palate ridge, where it rings out very well. I also try "goog", skipping through a chord (1,3,5) and progressively getting to higher chords.

The moment it feels forced, or there is tension, you're pushing too hard and need to stop.

Lastly, try sticking your tongue out as far as you can and then sing a fifth interval from chest to head. Do that a couple of times, and then sustain the high note and slowly pull your tongue in while trying to maintain the position of the resonance. For many of my more extreme vocal students, this exercise opened up their voice a lot. 

Experiment with moving the song forward and back on the tongue. Try to get it really harsh, right at your teeth, and then pull in in slowly from there. 

 

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Hi guys, I need a little explanation about which region you are talking about. Every time there is a new post about bridging or chest-head transition I get lost. So, are you talking about E4-A4 transition or a lower bridge? 

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If I may just add an opinion (sometimes contradictory) I am of the opinion that singing should be learned strong first, then (after you have gained requisite coordination and strength) you learn to sing piano...not lighter.....piano.

Singing light first to be stronger later I just don't subscribe to.  A lot also depends on the psychological makeup of the singer and the innate size of their voice.

There's way too much emphasis placed on avoiding tension at all costs....Until the student experiences some tension, how is he supposed to know what to avoid?

You asked:

"I want to know what it's like in-between, so I know if I'm making progress." 

One way you can tell if you are making progress is there will be less sensation of deflating or emptying out of air.  You will begin to feel a balance between the air pressure and the vocal folds, almost of suspension.

I know this doesn't address your full voice goal, but you cannot underestimate the importance of providing the voice with a steady consistent stream of air pressure.

The basic requisite is breath.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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18 minutes ago, VideoHere said:

If I may just add an opinion (sometimes contradictory) I am of the opinion that singing should be learned strong first, then (after you have gained requisite coordination and strength) you learn to sing piano...not lighter.....piano.

Singing light first to be stronger later I just don't subscribe to.  A lot also depends on the psychological makeup of the singer and the innate size of their voice.

There's way too much emphasis placed on avoiding tension at all costs....Until the student experiences some tension, how is he supposed to know what to avoid?

You asked:

"I want to know what it's like in-between, so I know if I'm making progress." 

One way you can tell if you are making progress is there will be less sensation of deflating or emptying out of air.  You will begin to feel a balance between the air pressure and the vocal folds, almost of suspension.

I know this doesn't address your full voice goal, but you cannot underestimate the importance of providing the voice with a steady consistent stream of air pressure.

The basic requisite is breath.

 

for me the bridging just turned on like a light bulb. There was no "sneaking up on it" or "easing in to it" or "getting it little by little." Another advice I see often is "just keep trying even if its flips a little...it will stop after a while." That didnt really work out for me as mine was more like a light switch. Once I felt it, it was there all at once

 

I was essentially singing with either chest voice or falsetto...but no head voice. So for me no amount of attempting to bridge lightly, or conversely trying to force it, was accomplishing anything. Even if I did it reeeeeaaaaallllllyyyy quietly it would just be a really quiet flip...but a flip none the less.

I was either choking or flipping but once I felt how to get a decent high note to resonate on the hard palate then automatically I was able to bridge up or down without an issue. Once the light bulb turned on I could bridge loudly or quietly. Id also say it was easier and more natural to do it loud at first because I learned head voice more or less thru a glottal attack thing....just learning to throw the note right up on the hard palate

So for me at least it wasnt really an issue or too much or too little strength or respiration....it was just feeling the correct coordination overall. Perhaps if I were training a student who either flipped or choked id say "ok, you KNOW the feeling of choking and you KNOW the feeling of flipping into falsetto.....DONT continue to try either of those feelings, find A DIFFERENT vibration or feeling." The wrong feeling at a lighter tension (or a heavier tension) is still the wrong feeling

 

That being said, the idea of "shedding weight" or "letting go of tension" DID help to cue me as far as what to try. Trying harder with more pressure was obviously going to choke me even worse.

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Jon,

Do you see now how it's all one voice?

You can, but you don't have to back off of anything.

You don't have to sing lightly any more than you have to sing heavy.

But if you work hard, you can extend the notes you can handle before you need to shift the resonance. Some call it "taking the chest voice up high" but that term connotes holding on to something which confuses the hell out of a singer.

The voice gets it path up or it's weight shedding from the vowel. I don't care how light or heavy you want to sing, If you don't use the right vowel/shade per the note, you are gonna get stuck.

 

 

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10 minutes ago, VideoHere said:

Jon,

Do you see now how it's all one voice?

You can, but you don't have to back off of anything.

You don't have to sing lightly any more than you have to sing heavy.

But if you work hard, you can extend the notes you can handle before you need to shift the resonance. Some call it "taking the chest voice up high" but that term connotes holding on to something which confuses the hell out of a singer.

The voice gets it path up or it's weight shedding from the vowel. I don't care how light or heavy you want to sing, If you don't use the right vowel/shade per the note, you are gonna get stuck.

I suppose in the end it's all about freedom and "just singing" without all of the technical thoughts about the involved mechanisms. That being said, while learning and training one will probably have to go thru some of the taking it apart aspect and the microscope aspect.

Even the subjects of vowels and tongue placement.....if someone put a gun to my head right now I wouldnt be able to give much of an answer to either of those subjects....yet I can already sing to a decent degree lol. Do I need to learn more and get better??? Absolutely. There are spots where I struggle and where I dont have true freedom and power yet and some of that is probably poor vowel choice etc.

 

I dont know that I necessarily have a dog in the "bridge late or bridge early" camps. Ultimately id like to keep a foot in both camps depending on which I want to do at the time.

I see it 2 ways.

1) just sing. if the phrase goes from B3 to B4, just sing it and make it sound good. Keep it simple and go for maximum feel and expression. Make it sound right and then, if u want, go back and dissect it with a microscope as far as when u bridged etc

2) get hardcore into the mechanical and technical aspects. Practice bridging early and/or late. Learn how each feels. How does it sound to carry a lot of weight and conversely to go really light etc. Learn it ALL in training and then you'll be able to forget it all when u actually sing

 

Obviously the "fun" area comes in that sort of passagio range where you can take a note, say around G4, and either belt it in chest, or blend up to head voice. Thats where one can experiment with all of the different colors and shades

 

I JUST got the feeling of bridging. So before that I had a million questions. Already now I just sing a "bridged" phrase without thinking too much about it. I may though go back and forth between "just singing" on the one hand and micro-analyzing on the other hand as I try to dial in certain particular sounds

Obviously guys like Lou Gramm or John Fogerty may have a different approach than, say, Ray Gillen or Mark Slaughter....but they all sing great stuff

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Jon i wish i could sit you down and explain this stuff so you don't get confused . There is still so much noise out there and confusion with all the terms blah blah blah.. . when singing in its simplicity is only a few principles.  If you learn from someone that demonstrates what you want and how to get there it makes it way easier...Good luck out there;)

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8 minutes ago, Danielformica said:

Jon i wish i could sit you down and explain this stuff so you don't get confused . There is still so much noise out there and confusion with all the terms blah blah blah.. . when singing in its simplicity is only a few principles.  If you learn from someone that demonstrates what you want and how to get there it makes it way easier...Good luck out there;)

Im not TOO hung up on the terms so much at this point. (at least since I finally learned to bridge lol)

 

Im sort of trying to take both a left brained approach (technical, mechanical) AND a right brained approach (intuitive, feeling it, mimicking others etc)

 

One thing I think would be great is if the teachers would really get into breaking down some of the singers voices. How do they get a certain sound or tone. For instance I commented on your youtube vid where u did that awesome Badlands snippet. What would be REALLY killer is to compare, for instance, Ray Gillens voice to, Paul Rogers voice or Mark Toriens voice.

One famous guy has a light, pure, and clear voice while another famous guy has a warmer, more raspy voice with a lot more weight. If it were described HOW in general do they get those different sounds, that would be like THE most instructive thing ever IMO

Im listening to the BulletBoys 1991 "freakShow" album. Marq Torient was such a powerful singer. Its a tour-de-force of various voices and techniques

 

Peace Brother

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1 hour ago, JonJon said:

Im not TOO hung up on the terms so much at this point. (at least since I finally learned to bridge lol)

 

Im sort of trying to take both a left brained approach (technical, mechanical) AND a right brained approach (intuitive, feeling it, mimicking others etc)

 

One thing I think would be great is if the teachers would really get into breaking down some of the singers voices. How do they get a certain sound or tone. For instance I commented on your youtube vid where u did that awesome Badlands snippet. What would be REALLY killer is to compare, for instance, Ray Gillens voice to, Paul Rogers voice or Mark Toriens voice.

One famous guy has a light, pure, and clear voice while another famous guy has a warmer, more raspy voice with a lot more weight. If it were described HOW in general do they get those different sounds, that would be like THE most instructive thing ever IMO

Im listening to the BulletBoys 1991 "freakShow" album. Marq Torient was such a powerful singer. Its a tour-de-force of various voices and techniques

 

Peace Brother

JonJon,

Kevin Richards some videos regarding the boldface:

 

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26 minutes ago, Jabroni said:

JonJon,

Kevin Richards some videos regarding the boldface:

 

 

 

yeah ive seen those and a few by other teachers etc. great stuff but its only scratching the surface

There are soooo many great singers and different sounds to be used and learned. To me those "here is how this great singer gets this great sound" is a little more useful than, say, an xray of the throat

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the way you get those sounds is being able to sing the notes of the song you want well, and then just thinking the sound you want and practicing it till you get it as easy as singing it normal. i put some vids out showing how to sing Cornell and bon jovi clean and then dirty.

You are not going to learn it from looking at a bunch of videos of guys doing it. you got to put the years and hours in. I have a course that teaches the raspy distortion stuff but again you got to put the time in. not just a few days weeks or even months you gotta put real time and get some experience. People asked Pavarotti how he got his passagio and voice so seamless he says after 20 years and in another video he says 10 years . point being it takes real time and hard work. i had already been gigging 10 years before i tried rasp. And then it took years to get it easier and different kinds. 

Put the time into singing seriously.  Find a good coach that demonstrates what you want and has good technique and study for years not just one lesson here and there and then stopping and then taking two or three with another coach.   Put a band together or duo or solo gig and start learning or writing  but get a repertoire of 30 tunes and gig on those tunes week after week. 

 

this is how you get results.:)

 

 

ps i think my sound cloud has the whole badlands tune on it not just a snippet ;)

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5 hours ago, Danielformica said:

the way you get those sounds is being able to sing the notes of the song you want well, and then just thinking the sound you want and practicing it till you get it as easy as singing it normal. i put some vids out showing how to sing Cornell and bon jovi clean and then dirty.

You are not going to learn it from looking at a bunch of videos of guys doing it. you got to put the years and hours in. I have a course that teaches the raspy distortion stuff but again you got to put the time in. not just a few days weeks or even months you gotta put real time and get some experience. People asked Pavarotti how he got his passagio and voice so seamless he says after 20 years and in another video he says 10 years . point being it takes real time and hard work. i had already been gigging 10 years before i tried rasp. And then it took years to get it easier and different kinds. 

Put the time into singing seriously.  Find a good coach that demonstrates what you want and has good technique and study for years not just one lesson here and there and then stopping and then taking two or three with another coach.   Put a band together or duo or solo gig and start learning or writing  but get a repertoire of 30 tunes and gig on those tunes week after week. 

 

this is how you get results.:)

 

 

ps i think my sound cloud has the whole badlands tune on it not just a snippet ;)

But Daniel, just like the show, Limitless, I want a magic pill to take that makes me a genius singer for 12 hours. That seems much easier than having patience and a diligent work ethic.

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Jon,

You stated:

"One famous guy has a light, pure, and clear voice while another famous guy has a warmer, more raspy voice with a lot more weight. If it were described HOW in general do they get those different sounds, that would be like THE most instructive thing ever IMO ."

Like they say, "You've come to the right place."  I have spent many, years trying to emulate different voices....Intentionally configuring my voice to sound different (when I wanted to)....way before voice study. I looked at Ventriloquists, Impersonators, and while I didn't actually study them, I watched and observed, and I guess took in what they were doing.

First, you have to understand that some of this "sound/voice" particularly their weight is innate.  It is their physiological makeup or endowment...the thickness and length of their folds, their throat, their bones, all of it. Like fingerprints, no 2 singers can sound exactly alike.

Why else are there lyric voices vs. dramatic?  A lot of it is their natural makeup.

BUT....You can learn different ways to configure and manuver your voice and tongue and jaw, etc. to get close to ANY sound. 

I can tell you exactly how to get to that Motown sound (for example), but a lot depends on where your voice is now.

It's technique and study that helps you get this capability AND your mental intent. 

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