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Hi,

Kind of a basic question, I was wondering if anyone has suggestions for some exercises where I can develop a stronger chest voice. I'm male and I'm most comfortable in a tenor/countertenor range. I can hit high notes easily, but others have said my lower range lacks strength and sounds a bit hollow/breathy like a yawn, almost like a bit of falsetto mixed in. I'm trying my best at breath control and making sure the voice is "pushed down" and coming from chest. I guess the perfect chest voice is one that sounds like you're giving an important speech? That's what I'm trying to achieve.

I don't really have the time for regular singing lessons as I just sing as a hobby. Sometimes it's difficult to evaluate your own singing because not only is the sound I hear in my ears when I sing very different from what others hear, but it's natural for people to simply think their own voice sounds bad or weird when recorded and played back.

Thanks.

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12 hours ago, KLQYS said:

Hi,

Kind of a basic question, I was wondering if anyone has suggestions for some exercises where I can develop a stronger chest voice. I'm male and I'm most comfortable in a tenor/countertenor range. I can hit high notes easily, but others have said my lower range lacks strength and sounds a bit hollow/breathy like a yawn, almost like a bit of falsetto mixed in. I'm trying my best at breath control and making sure the voice is "pushed down" and coming from chest. I guess the perfect chest voice is one that sounds like you're giving an important speech? That's what I'm trying to achieve.

I don't really have the time for regular singing lessons as I just sing as a hobby. Sometimes it's difficult to evaluate your own singing because not only is the sound I hear in my ears when I sing very different from what others hear, but it's natural for people to simply think their own voice sounds bad or weird when recorded and played back.

Thanks.

You have already answered your own question but maybe you are looking for validation or at least a check of cognitive faculties and reasonable assumptions.

Thing is, I don't know which assumptions are which. Who is saying that your lowest notes are weak and not chest enough? What are they comparing to? I hate to get all einsteinian on you but relativity matters in definitions, even if it has nothing to do with the speed of light. (Don't worry, Einstein is wrong but some points can be used in rhetoric.)

Against who's voice are they comparing yours? Phil Anselmo will sound more baritonic or basso than most of humanity, for example. David Lee Roth is going to sound more chesty than Rik Emmett, even when David is singing lightly in his lower range.

The voice comes from the head, regardless of what part of the range. the most you get out of the body is parasympathetic vibrations. But you do want to manage the breath.

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Honestly, I think one of the best things you can do is... train the 5 resistance training routines designed for belting in my training system, The Four Pillars of Singing. That is just the bottom-line.  That is specifically what those routines are designed for and the are VERY effective. They work.

 

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Take your "voice" up in a scale on "may" (just one example) energetically, supported, till you hit resistance, a brick wall , a feeling of "you can't go anymore" etc.

Take note and feel yourself, allow yourself to experience and really sense well what it feels like to hit a point where you cannot go higher. 

Now don't push more, but figure how you are going employ a throat shape (vowel shade) to allow the voice further up.  What shape is going to release the voice or carve the voice to go into or towards a headier position?  Get out your vowel mod. charts, pick the vowel, I'm not telling you, and think in a little bit of that vowel, feel, sense, if you are getting a release through that shade of vowel.....

and practice and experiment.....

The you might want to try "mee"  or another vowel.

But the important thing is you work through this, and feel it and sense it rather than try to just go around it. In time, you will find your pathway to the upper head tones, semitone by semitone in your full voice.

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Frisell taught me to disassociate vowels ah, eh, etc. with speech...A vowel is a throat shaping.  If you remove the association of a vowel with speech it becomes easier to think them in.. That's what I learned from Frisell, and it has helped me a great deal.  He gave the exercise of shaping the vowels without the use of the tongue.  

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17 minutes ago, VideoHere said:

Frisell taught me to disassociate vowels ah, eh, etc. with speech...A vowel is a throat shaping.  If you remove the association of a vowel with speech it becomes easier to think them in.. That's what I learned from Frisell, and it has helped me a great deal.  He gave the exercise of shaping the vowels without the use of the tongue.  

That is brilliant and Frisell is absolutely right about that. This is what we teach in The Four Pillars of Singing as well. We call it "throat shaping" the vowels, or singing vowels. And I always make a big deal about how we are not dealing with language vowels, but singing vowels... which are NOT the same. When students begin to grasp that fact, they take the first BIG step forward in learning about the acoustics of singing. This realization, is the first big leap that has to be realized. Great point Bob.  BTW... I encourage you to go into your new copy of 4Pillars and participate in the "TVS Acoustic Mode" module, where this is all explained.

 

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On April 18, 2016 at 2:22 PM, Danielformica said:

i wouldn't shape the vowel in your throat it will only distort and make the sound fall back keep. a good resonance and keep that tip of the tongue  against the bottom front teeth and let the back of the tongue move for vowels.

Yes, agreed. "... letting the tongue help articulate the singing vowels in the back of the tongue, which also includes the soft palate... however, when we talk about "throat shaping" vowels in TVS, it is not something that distorts or creates any disturbance of that kind. "Throat shaping" vowels is just a way of saying, precision movements of the articulators; tongue, palate, vocal track, etc... to shape the vowels. It also translates to, "... shape the vowels with the articulators and more intrinsically (inside movements) and not on the outside with a big clunky, "muppet puppet" mouth and inefficient "hinging" mandible (lower jaw bone).

Totally straight on Dan, but the term 'throat shaping' , isn't a 'violent' moment, it just means using the articulators to form the vowels inside... 

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On April 17, 2016 at 6:12 PM, KLQYS said:

Hi,

Kind of a basic question, I was wondering if anyone has suggestions for some exercises where I can develop a stronger chest voice. I'm male and I'm most comfortable in a tenor/countertenor range. I can hit high notes easily, but others have said my lower range lacks strength and sounds a bit hollow/breathy like a yawn, almost like a bit of falsetto mixed in. I'm trying my best at breath control and making sure the voice is "pushed down" and coming from chest. I guess the perfect chest voice is one that sounds like you're giving an important speech? That's what I'm trying to achieve.

I don't really have the time for regular singing lessons as I just sing as a hobby. Sometimes it's difficult to evaluate your own singing because not only is the sound I hear in my ears when I sing very different from what others hear, but it's natural for people to simply think their own voice sounds bad or weird when recorded and played back.

Thanks.

Hi... Yes, as a matter of fact, I do.

In my training program, "The Four Pillars of Singing", which is designed to be a home study program that does not require private lessons with me, (although it is still a good idea, ... ), there are a set of five workouts and about 10 lessons in the system that specifically focus on explaining what is going on and how to train and develop high chest voice or belts. Understand that your interest in this is not unique. This is what pretty much everyone wants. People want to get the high chest voice sound color as much as we all want to get a smooth bridge between the registers. It is an intimate part of the vocal technique and training purpose. So the point is, at least in my program, this very skill set has a lot of content and focus.

Now, I understand you said you don't want to take lessons, and thats ok. But you need to understand that you will never be able to train a high chest voice belt skill set, if you don't at least, ... train your voice with a program like mine or one that can actually show you how to do train it. Getting on Youtube videos and/or this forum and just seeking a "tip" with posts, isn't going to really get you there. It might turn up the light a tiny bit, it certainly will interest you a bit, but the ability to actually do this consistently in a lasting way, will not happen by trying to glee "tips" off of videos and forum posts. The singing voice is a system that is made of muscles, cartilage, tendons, etc... physical moving parts and vocal training is a sport. Like any sport, you have to workout. If you are not prepared to train, it just isn't going to happen for you anymore then getting tips on how to dribble a basketball, but never actually practicing it will. It is the same thing. Just because your voice is something that is already sitting in your body, that doesn't mean it is ready go and sing amazing, if only had the right free tip. That is a naive fantasy that many beginners need to get past.

Now, I'm not suggesting that this is what you are thinking, only asserting that maybe it is because this seems to be what a LOT of beginners think. If this is more or less your approach, I recommend that you go to the next level. That would be realizing that you have to actually train and practice this stuff and to do that, you need a program that shows you how.

Here is a little something I did that explains the musculature of belting or "high chest voice". It is not every element or muscle. To do so would bore the hell out of people and no one would grasp it anyways. So this is an accessible overview of what might be considered to be the most prevalent musculature and basic understanding. Again, in my program, The Four Pillars of Singing, the training routines are designed to build the strength of this muscle.

Contact me privately on the system and I can help you out... don't be shy.

 

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On April 17, 2016 at 6:52 PM, JonJon said:

 

be careful if u live in a quiet apartment lol

 

LOL... Hey Jon, thanks for sharing this... This video is a "youtube" thing... its fun and interesting, but the full lesson and detailed explanation is in the program... but again, thanks for sharing... 

How are your belts coming along? I hope your working on those resistance training routines in the Integrated Training Routines?  Have you checked them out yet?

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On April 17, 2016 at 9:08 PM, Rockstar said:

Try doing broad "Aa" on a scale (as in bat) but don't go overboard with the broadness. Go only as far as comfortable in your chest voice. Your voice should feel solid after this.

Hi Rock... 

Actually this could result in too my splatting of the vowel on top. That would result in the vowel not being narrowed and in fact, would weaken the ability of the belt musculature to get stronger. If you mean /ae/ as in "cat"... ya, not the best vowel to train to "pull" chest voice. It would do the opposite of what the topic author needs, which is to belt, strengthen TA, which requires larynx anchoring and narrowing... this vowel won't do that for you.

This vowel is good however for helping beginners to bridge past A4 (formant shift) and for getting a nice bright twang in the head voice. But after you have achieved that, you really need to move onto warmer, narrowed vowels. Remaining on /ae/ = "cat" will just keep you weak.

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On April 17, 2016 at 10:13 PM, Xamedhi said:

I personally, train chest voice strength, and strength in general, by doing sustained long notes. Like an F4 in my highest intensity/volume, for as long as I can. 

yes, that is a good resistance training idea... you sustain on the hard notes and force your body to feel it, "sit" in it and get used to it. It is like holding the barbell in a static position. It also allows you to find the best sweet spot of resonance. Without sustaining, it is really hard for the body to learn what your asking it to do. Not a bad idea.

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On April 18, 2016 at 2:00 PM, VideoHere said:

Take note and feel yourself, allow yourself to experience and really sense well what it feels like to hit a point where you cannot go higher. 

Now don't push more, but figure how you are going employ a throat shape (vowel shade) to allow the voice further up.  What shape is going to release the voice or carve the voice to go into or towards a headier position?  Get out your vowel mod. charts, pick the vowel, I'm not telling you, and think in a little bit of that vowel, feel, sense, if you are getting a release through that shade of vowel.....

YES... what Bob is saying is.. but throat shaping in a sustained position,... at the last note that is comfortable for you is... it forces the body to find the physiology or "shape" it needs to sit in... AND... the resonance (vowel) for that frequency. 

 

GET THIS!

Every frequency requires its own, unique physical and acoustic configuration, for every singing vowel.

 

10 basic singing formants (approx.) x 24 usable notes (C3 - C5, lets just assume this range for the moment) = 240 potential physical/acoustic tunings.

 

What that formula is saying is:

Physical configuration + Acoustic Formant Tuning ( 10 formats x 24 practical frequencies )

= 240 combined physical & acoustic positions the body has to build into muscle memory.

 

And we can all agree, that is conservative. It is just a rough estimate... but you can see how many different variants there can be... You see why you need to train?  No one is going to get this working for themselves by reading "tips" on a forum and watching youtube videos from people that never demonstrate, and don't know what they are really talking about.

This is the reality of what it takes. And frankly, the absolute bare minimum... everyone on this forum that can do this stuff; Bob, Dan, X, me, Felipe, MDEW, Ron, ... has done this. Either through a vocal training program, or a lifetime of singing... or most likey, because I know these guys... a combination of both.

Now if you don't want to spend a lifetime doing this, then at least get a program that can accelerate your changes because it explains and shows you exactly what you need to do. On my training program, for MOST people... if you follow the instructions and really get after it... you can experience amazing results in about 2-6 weeks. Read the reviews from real clients.

... I hate the fact that it looks like I'm just pitching my stuff... I suppose I am, but... GIVE ME THE BENEFIT OF THE DOUBT... its more than just that. It truly is, one of the best ways for people on this forum to get what they keep asking for! I'm trying to guide you guys to where you can actually get a real solution and get real results... and get out of this "tail chasing", "free secret tip" pursuit that will get 9 out of 10 of you no where. You come to this forum asking for help... and recommending my program, honestly, is the best advise I can give you.

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27 minutes ago, Robert Lunte said:

LOL... Hey Jon, thanks for sharing this... This video is a "youtube" thing... its fun and interesting, but the full lesson and detailed explanation is in the program... but again, thanks for sharing... 

How are your belts coming along? I hope your working on those resistance training routines in the Integrated Training Routines?  Have you checked them out yet?

Rob, you know me by now...im almost the "anti student" or "accidental learner."  It's not ideal but it is what it is.

Believe it or not I get most of my practicing done at work. I can generally belt or siren or glottal attack to my hearts delight

 

They once took an XRay of the portion of my brain that is responsible for organization---->

pure-abstract-art.jpg

 

Thats what Im working with

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On 4/17/2016 at 1:13 AM, Xamedhi said:

I personally, train chest voice strength, and strength in general, by doing sustained long notes. Like an F4 in my highest intensity/volume, for as long as I can. 

That's great but only a part of it. You also need to learn to tweak and tune the vowels while you're up there. Learn how to lean into and back off of the intensity.

Learn how to siren up to them, down from them, over them..... 

 

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On 4/21/2016 at 3:11 PM, Robert Lunte said:

  BTW... I encourage you to go into your new copy of 4Pillars and participate in the "TVS Acoustic Mode" module, where this is all explained.

 

yeah, checking these now. It helps to go thru the "modules"

 

Killer stuff Rob. These vids are what I need after a hard day of work....whereas reading lines of text means absolutely nothing lol. The vids and graphics allow the info to seep in

 

Cheers

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3 minutes ago, Robert Lunte said:

Cool Jon... yes, a video is worth 10,000 printed words. It is a great medium for educating. Really glad to hear that your using the system and getting a lot out of it.

the acoustic modes info.....thats going to come in handy as far as going for certain sounds, or figuring out why a certain singer has a characteristic sound etc. Good stuff

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