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Can I Develop These Notes?

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2 hours ago, muffinhead said:

Update #5: I really, really do not know what's going on. I was messing around again today, and found a very light voice (not falsetto), that can go all the way up to A5, and can connect down into chest voice. This is not hard for me to do at all, in fact, it's pretty easy. Am I a freak of nature for being able to sing up this high? (and low, I can go down to E2 on a good day), in full voice, with only a month and a half of training?

If it's connected, that's a good start. As for your lowest and highest notes, there's a pretty decent amount of members in this forum with that range

43 minutes ago, muffinhead said:

And one more thing: after doing some slightly obsessive research, I have come to the conclusion that I am quite possibly a leggero tenor. This fach seems to fit quite perfectly, as I can go pretty low, but also have this high range that goes beyond what standard tenors can do. The timbre of some examples I've listened to also seems to match what mine is like. I know that vocal classification is pretty controversial, but I, like so many people, like labels as they give me piece of mind and provide a certain type of framework in which I can look to develop my voice. 

Hey I don't want to derail your topic but I would actually advise you not to obsess over your voice type. Why? Because those labels turn into walls and limits of how you SHOULD sound, not all the possibilities of how you as an unique individual CAN sound. Case in point: I myself did this when I started singing and also came to the conclusion that I was a leggiero tenor because my voice quality was light and I could sing to an F2 pretty easily. Then I found this site that said leggiero tenors should not overproduce the chest voice and that they undergo some sort of tonal bridge/transition point after G#4. So I said to myself "that's it, I will not sing too heavy and the G#4 thing describes me perfectly." Well I ended up with a weak chest voice AND a weak head voice because I de-emphasized chest voice. The thing I found out from these mistakes is that a good head voice stems from a solid foundation in your chest voice. Finally, a bridge point at G#4/A4 is actually standard for most guys, not just leggiero tenors.

In the end I ended up spending more time looking into what kind of voice type I was than actually training lol And on that topic, leggiero tenor has to do a lot with the training you undergo to fit a certain role. You aren't born as a leggiero per se. Plenty of opera singers start out as leggiero tenors and develop into full lyric tenors over time. 

It all depends though. Are you planning on singing classical? If so, then I would suggest you find a good classical voice teacher and he/she can help you out with the voice type thing. But even so, I've worked with classical teachers and they tell beginners not to worry about that at first. After so many months or years of study, the voice "unveils" itself and then they start suggesting roles that fit your voice. 

If you're not going into classical, then these labels don't really apply. Classical and contemporary often take different approaches to the voice, such as their views on the registers (especially for females, some of whom advocate everything completely in head voice). I see sites such as these http://www.divadevotee.com/2009/03/blog-post.html and I'm like "how do they know Mariah Carey is not only a soprano, but a LYRIC soprano?? She doesn't even sing classical." That's kind of a ridiculous example but if I'm in need of some comedy, those sites get me laughing quickly.

My take on this matter is don't get stuck in labels and boundaries; sing smart, sing a lot and you'll get there. Good luck!

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perhaps you are related to Dorian Grey (Gray)??

If it's connected, that's a good start. As for your lowest and highest notes, there's a pretty decent amount of members in this forum with that range Hey I don't want to derail your topic but I

I"m a natural Baritone. I used to hit a wall at F4. Then it went up one note at a time. I can easily sing E5 connected now, and up to a B5 with a solid head voice. It merely takes time a training prop

The thing is... does the timbre sound convincing in a song  with what you are doing? If not, then keep practicing and getting more fold adduction ( and don't forget about vocal tract shaping ) until you are comfortable with the timbre you are getting and the power you need for your desired material.

If it works and sounds great, then who cares what it is? People will admire it anyway and will try to sing your songs either way thinking "How the hell does he do that?"

What I think you could do is memorize and control all those different coordinations you just found, and work on them, every single day. EVERY. SINGLE. DAY. lol  Good luck, man :D I hope you get where you want :) 

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22 hours ago, Xamedhi said:

The thing is... does the timbre sound convincing in a song  with what you are doing? If not, then keep practicing and getting more fold adduction ( and don't forget about vocal tract shaping ) until you are comfortable with the timbre you are getting and the power you need for your desired material.

If it works and sounds great, then who cares what it is? People will admire it anyway and will try to sing your songs either way thinking "How the hell does he do that?"

What I think you could do is memorize and control all those different coordinations you just found, and work on them, every single day. EVERY. SINGLE. DAY. lol  Good luck, man :D I hope you get where you want :) 

The timbre on the high notes, going from about A4 to A5, sounds most like 80's glam metal singers, a la Bon Jovi, or like some nu-metal singers. I'm not too much a fan of this kind of music; in fact, I really am aiming for Chris Cornell-like screams, and am looking at ways to achieve that sort of aggressive sound. Also, I've noticed I have a lot of trouble bridging between the A4-B4 notes, which probably has something to do with different muscles coming in as I move up in pitch. My chest voice sounds pretty baritone-like I think. At this point, though, I am so happy to be able to sing up so high, that if I'm not able to achieve the timbre I desire, it would only be a minor disappointment. 

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On 4/23/2016 at 8:03 PM, JonJon said:

well, its the modern thing you know, we wouldnt want to sound too "manly" or anything

 

Another guy, going from memory......Robert Palmer?

Yup he is another.  Joey Tempest is another.  

Singing chest dominant is what the Opera guys are doing, HOWEVER, their top notes (in most cases) aren't going much past C5, but the notes sound amazing.

Jon, here's another thing to be mindful of....a singer could be singing in a chest dominant way, but not sound as chesty as someone else might.....i.e., a lyric vs. a dramatic voice....fun, fun, fun....:4:

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On 4/19/2016 at 12:43 PM, Danielformica said:

20 years ago wow you look young. Are you in your 40s like myself? We're you classified before puberty? I've never heard anyone pull chest to D5 are you positive it's chest or is it mixed voice ?

um i can sing up to an F#5 in chest voice and i am 14 years old and a boy, so I have probably finished puberty. it kind of sounds like yelling though lmao. but D5 would be very comfortable. i have gotten used to singing male songs an octave up cuz i cannot sing low at all.

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