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Nebo

MXL v67 VS sE X1

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Hey guys, I need a mic for my home studio as I'm starting recording covers - different genres (pop, rock, metal, country, jazz). 

I have that external sound card or preamp (right?). I plugin the mic to it and connect it on USB with the computer. I process the signal later in Cubase.

I've been researching and two mics stood out - MXL v67 and sE X1. I've learned that v67 is a tube mic and sE is not, so they are not in the same category.

How would you compare these two? From technical, sound and practical side.

PS: sE x1 T actually is a tube mic but it's more expensive. How do you you compare it with MXL v67?

Thanks in advance!

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I already own SM57 and have an idea of using both SM57 and that new mic I buy for recording covers.

In that sense, I would buy complementary mic - they say sE X1 is more for rock/metal, higher pitch, screaming and v67 a more warmer mid-section pop player. 

For what singing style/genre is SM57 good for? Which one of these two models would be a good combination with SM57?

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1 hour ago, Nebo said:

I already own SM57 and have an idea of using both SM57 and that new mic I buy for recording covers.

In that sense, I would buy complementary mic - they say sE X1 is more for rock/metal, higher pitch, screaming and v67 a more warmer mid-section pop player. 

For what singing style/genre is SM57 good for? Which one of these two models would be a good combination with SM57?

Hi Nebo, I wish I could give you a technical advice regarding those mics, but as I own different ones, such as sure PGs, Audiotecnica, AKG, and Sennheiser (all dynamic), and a Behringer (B2), I could not say much about it. However, If you are buying a microphone to record yourself, maybe you should try them out, so you would have a better idea of how they compliment or not your voice. All the best.

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And if we take into consideration condenser sensitivity and recording room/space?

This is my potential recording space.

ROOM 1:
df84f4106f.jpg
Mic would face completely closed curtains and computer would be on the same spot, behind the mic. Across the curtains there is a mirror, but I can cover it or curtains would do enough for embracing the sound enough? Side doors can be closed for the sake of preventing echoes from the room next to it.

ROOM 2:
df88b06d11.jpg
Mic would face curtains and the couch. Across the curtains there is a wall and a door that would be closed. Side doors would be closed for the sake of preventing echoes and computer fan from the ROOM 1.

I have a pop filter and didn't plan buying reflection filter, but if needed I would. What room would you pick from these two? Do you have some other suggestions for easy sound isolation?

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I have the MXL V67G and I love it. It is my preferred mic for vocals. The Fame CM-1 I have is good for guitar, though I have used the MXL to record a classical guitar.

The 67 was designed to mimick the look and sound of a vintage tube mic and it gets pretty close. In fact, it's lower end peters out at 30 Hz, instead of 20, which is fine for singers. And it has a warm and dark sound, meaning that it naturally rolls off some of the highest partials, which is also good for me, since I already have a light and bright voice.

Mine is a solid state but sounds like a tube. And really, all a tube is doing is getting saturated and losing some high partials. You achieve the same thing with solid state by mimicking that behavior.

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On July 31, 2016 at 10:15 AM, Nebo said:

And if we take into consideration condenser sensitivity and recording room/space?

This is my potential recording space.

ROOM 1:
Mic would face completely closed curtains and computer would be on the same spot, behind the mic. Across the curtains there is a mirror, but I can cover it or curtains would do enough for embracing the sound enough? Side doors can be closed for the sake of preventing echoes from the room next to it.

ROOM 2:
Mic would face curtains and the couch. Across the curtains there is a wall and a door that would be closed. Side doors would be closed for the sake of preventing echoes and computer fan from the ROOM 1.

I have a pop filter and didn't plan buying reflection filter, but if needed I would. What room would you pick from these two? Do you have some other suggestions for easy sound isolation?

Hi Nebo, I think you should do test recordings and evaluate them. Pop filter is a must, as you'll want to avoid the plosives from "p" an "b". One general rule for recording is basically to avoid too much natural reverb from the room, as you cannot remove it from the recording later on. Therefore, you should avoid reflective surfaces, parallel walls and ceiling/floor, if you can. However, as you can always "tune" the room to your liking, by adding absorbent material, such as heavy/thick curtains, carpets, furniture, etc, it is usually better to start with a relatively more live room than a dead room. But in the end, as it depends on the type of music or atmosphere you going to record your songs, you should definitely do some tests. All the best 

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