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Vocal Onsets - What Are They?  

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  1. 1. Which TVS Vocal Onsets Have You Practiced Before?

    • Track & Release
      3
    • Pulse & Release
      3
    • Wind & Release
      3
    • Quack & Release
      3
    • Dampen & Release
      3
    • Attack & Release
      5
    • Contract & Release
      3
    • Messa di Voce & Release
      3


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Using vocal fry is a way to lighten the mass, or stop the pushing in your singing. At TVS, one of the 8 specialized onsets ( how you start a note ) that we teach in the TVS Method is called the, "Pulse & Release Onset", or Vocal Fry Onset. It is also called the, "Light Mass Onset". The Pulse & Release Onset is used to help singers build the coordination for singing without pushing. It "governs" the weight or "mass" of your singing, helping singers to stop pushing.

 

 

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I have to admit the organization of a training approach based around various onsets is a pretty ingenious idea. Why? Well if nothing else it allows us to approach our singing from various angles, thus building a more complete singing instrument.

We humans tend to only do what we are already good at. If we know how to sing "heavy" then we just keep singing heavy and gravitate to those kinds of exercises and styles. If we just naturally sing "lighter" then we tend to stay in that bag.

BUT, the use of the specialized onsets helps get us out of our comfort zones by forcing us to approach singing from various angles. On the one hand we have the Attack and Release and the Contract and Release type onsets that allow us to really "gear up" and learn to sing very powerfully. On the other hand we have the lighter type onsets such as the Pulse and Release and the Wind and Release that bring us away from the heavy phonations and teach us to ease into our singing as opposed to blasting away.

Yin and Yang.

As someone who tends to squeeze and choke, I have been helped greatly by exposure to the lighter type onsets. When I train I tend to just blast away after I get warmed up, but there are times when a heavy onset puts you on the wrong path to try to hit a higher note. Sometimes one has to get a little wind in the onset or sort of creak into it as in a Pulse and Release type onset. It definitely helps to have some understanding of the various ways to start a note.

Whats the old saying? "Well begun is half done!"

 

Cheers Rob, JJ

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  I have been waiting for someone else to start this thread........I think a lot of people are missing the most important thing about Roberts method of teaching and his many onsets. People keep looking for tips on "HOW to SING LIKE (you pick the artist)"  The key is in what onsets are they using. The onsets are great for Exercising and building muscle memory but they also lead you to new and different co-ordinations.

   If you want sing like Steve Perry and you are exercising Dark tembred Low larynx,heavy mass belting exercises you are going to miss the co-ordination. Four Pillars has Light Mass exercises, Acoustic modes, Vowel modification, Messa di Voce, Formant tuning...........

     In another forum/method that uses Vocal modes, the members would break down songs by the acoustic modes, Pick a song apart and learn the individual phrases. One phrase may use a light mass with cry another may use an Edge vowel with heavier mass while still another phrase will use a windy falsetto with more twang.....All in the same song, sometime you get a mixture in the same phrase.

      Four Pillars has everything that other method has and more. Use the different onsets to help with certain areas that you are having trouble with. You may be having trouble because you are belting when you should be using a lighter mass with more twang.

      These onsets are trouble shooters too. Not just exercises. Tools to help calibrate and strengthen. Use them to your advantage.

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Well if you watch the vid on "Acoustic mode onsets", that basically IS my method.

 

I take 10 words that happen to have 10 different vowels and usually different consonants. Each time I train I make up the list on the spot.

here is an example of what the list may be on a random day:

Woah

Say

Meal

Tight

Hall

Gun

Pool

Cat

Leg

Fit (by far my least fave vowel lol)

10 vowels and 10 consonants. The next day it will be some other random combination.

5 sirens on one breath as follows: chest to head to chest to head to chest. Go thru the list and then do the same 5 sirens but head to chest to head to chest to head. That way Im onsetting in chest and head voice. I start off with very light mass (at 530 am?? yeah, light mass works lol) but by the time ive worked to the head voice onsets it gets more into attack and release or whatever other onset flows from the random acoustic mode combination

 

Done 4x per week while at work. Helps pass the time and next thing you know you can sing pretty well lol

 

 

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22 hours ago, JonJon said:

I have to admit the organization of a training approach based around various onsets is a pretty ingenious idea. Why? Well if nothing else it allows us to approach our singing from various angles, thus building a more complete singing instrument.

We humans tend to only do what we are already good at. If we know how to sing "heavy" then we just keep singing heavy and gravitate to those kinds of exercises and styles. If we just naturally sing "lighter" then we tend to stay in that bag.

BUT, the use of the specialized onsets helps get us out of our comfort zones by forcing us to approach singing from various angles. On the one hand we have the Attack and Release and the Contract and Release type onsets that allow us to really "gear up" and learn to sing very powerfully. On the other hand we have the lighter type onsets such as the Pulse and Release and the Wind and Release that bring us away from the heavy phonations and teach us to ease into our singing as opposed to blasting away.

Yin and Yang.

As someone who tends to squeeze and choke, I have been helped greatly by exposure to the lighter type onsets. When I train I tend to just blast away after I get warmed up, but there are times when a heavy onset puts you on the wrong path to try to hit a higher note. Sometimes one has to get a little wind in the onset or sort of creak into it as in a Pulse and Release type onset. It definitely helps to have some understanding of the various ways to start a note.

Whats the old saying? "Well begun is half done!"

 

Cheers Rob, JJ

Just great to hear all that JonJon... super happy to hear that your "getting it" and that its helping you. 

All you onset guys remember this...

Among other things, the onsets are MOSTLY defined by the phonetics that they start with.

 

Nasals = T&R
Vowels = A&R

/h/=W&R

Plosives = D&R

Etc...

When you internalize that... you have a HUGE "eureka" moment!  ... Every word in your lyrics is an onset and if you know what the phonetics are for each of the TVS onsets, you can then have an advantage on your songs, but mapping the lyrics for onsets.

It is the phonetics guys... It all boils down to translating the phonetics of a language to a new exotic phonetics of singing, essentially a new language.

 

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20 hours ago, MDEW said:

The onsets are great for Exercising and building muscle memory but they also lead you to new and different co-ordinations.

Brilliant! You get it Joe... you totally get it.

20 hours ago, MDEW said:

These onsets are trouble shooters too. Not just exercises. Tools to help calibrate and strengthen.

Most definitely!... FOR SURE.

20 hours ago, MDEW said:

Four Pillars has everything that other method has and more.

Honestly, thats true... ( CVI ). The TVS Acoustic Modes is essentially... the CVI vocal modes, stripped lean from other confusing details, down to just vowels ( resonance and color ). One concept in 4Pillars, the Acoustic Modes, essentially picks up about 85% of the entire CVI idea. Glad to hear that someone else noticed that too. 

You want Estill modes... we got that, we call it Physical Modes. You want CVI sort of stuff, we got that, its called Acoustic Modes... You want KTVA's "pingy Ah" and bottom-up ideas... no problem, I give you the TVS Neutral vowel and an abundance of belting/bottom-up content...

However, you want onsets, training work flows and color associations with your formants, with a boat load of killer training tutorials... 4Pillars is the only place you can find it.

This is not by coincidence fellas... I purposely did this. If someone else had a good idea, I built upon it and added it to my own ideas and thats how we got 4Pillars.

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16 hours ago, JonJon said:

Well if you watch the vid on "Acoustic mode onsets", that basically IS my method

LOL!!!  I have to laugh because I also noticed that before on another post Jon... you are right... what you have been doing is essentially, the Alternative Acoustic Mode Onsets... or that is to say... onsets that are oriented around the vowel, not the physiology so much. 

Great insight Jon, my compliments to you ... 

In 4Pillars... on the "My Training Page" > Integrated Training Routines > There are 3 Acoustic Mode ITRs in there... made for Jon.

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54 minutes ago, Robert Lunte said:

Ok, let's have some fun...

POP QUIZ!

 

What is the only TVS Specialize Onset that is BOTH a coordination & a resistance onset... the only one that can sit in both groups?

:39:

Q&R

I use it for both all the time with students that can't yet do MDV or C&R.

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Dampen and Release may not be the official answer but believe me keeping a dampened co-ordination through a siren gives plenty of resistance.

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1 hour ago, Draven Grey said:

Q&R

I use it for both all the time with students that can't yet do MDV or C&R.

Sorry Joe, can't give you a likey on that.

Draven is correct, it is the Q&R Onset.

The hyper-compression on the vocal folds that comes from the Q&R onset is definitely resistance training work, but when you you consider the precision steps behind the work flow, it is also very much a coordination snd tuning onset.

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1 hour ago, MDEW said:

Dampen and Release may not be the official answer but believe me keeping a dampened co-ordination through a siren gives plenty of resistance.

Yes Joe, a D&R onset will configure your larynx into a great position. But after the onset is already moving, it no longer is an onset is it? 

The Phonation Package is an Onset Package, on the move.

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3 hours ago, Robert Lunte said:

POP QUIZ!  #1

Damn! I guessed wrong on d&r, but then looked it up in 4P and read about how d&r also builds strength for belting (page 182 & 183) thinking i had confirmed it as correct -  it's been a while, i need to crack the book open again!

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1 hour ago, Robert Lunte said:

TVS Specialized Onsets Pop Quiz #2

3 of the 8 onsets have training work flows, which ones are they?

q&r  c&r   can't seem to identify the 3rd. give us a hint? i haven't open booked it yet.

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16 hours ago, Kevin Ashe said:

q&r  c&r   can't seem to identify the 3rd. give us a hint? i haven't open booked it yet.

Its Italiano... English translation is, "Setting of Voice"...

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yeah, it's embarrassingly obvious now! I reviewed the lesson!

M&R  :41:           good boy Kevin! :angry:     

So when I watched the M&R lecture video I pulled something out of there this time that was grossly overlooked previously!

You point out the importance of cleanly executing each step of the workflow on the 3 workflow onsets, not because of some petty rule, but because it is so beneficial in establishing the precision muscle memory used when your "placement" is M2 with good closure!

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If I may be bold, I think you hit the nail on the head, Kevin. The devil is in the details and subtlety requires stopping and thinking, instead of just scanning over some words.

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16 hours ago, ronws said:

If I may be bold, I think you hit the nail on the head, Kevin. The devil is in the details and subtlety requires stopping and thinking, instead of just scanning over some words.

Ya, TVS Student goes to big "reference book" and finds the answer.

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