Jump to content

Which breathing technique should I use?

Rate this topic


forgivendays
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi. I've been using CVT's breathing technique for a couple of months now. When I breathe in my stomach goes in and my solar plexus, waist, and lower ribs expand. Then there's Jaime Vendera's technique (more common like in SLS) where your stomach expands when you breath in. Any insight from someone who used both? I wanna buy Vendera's Ultimate Breathing Workout to really improve my breathing but I'm not sure if I want to change a technique I've been using for months.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have the Vendera book but am not familiar with the other. I'd thought i'd chip in with some two cents.

Vendera is pretty clear on the point that you should intake as much air as possible when doing the breath workouts, even more so that when you actually sing. But you should not "pout" with stomach or use the abs to expand it.

So I'm not sure they need to be polar opposites. There may be a middle ground somewhere.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Keeping the ribs expanded is probebly the biggest factor in achieving good support, let noone discredit that. What pictures different coaches use does vary and so does their effectiveness. Their is no best method for all, if you wanna try new stuff then do it and see what feels best. As said before, you should avoid forcing your abs to do work.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you have Vendera's pdf version, you will have access to the tutorials on his website. Then you can physically see what he is doing. From how he stands and breathes to how he massages his throat to keep his muscles supple.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

More exercises does not at all have to correlate with how good something is. ;) The CVT book has one of the best support chapter's in the industry, but you could of course try different techniques if you're not getting the results you want. Do you feel like your current breathing is causing you troubles?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I dunno. I'm just not 100% positive I'm doing it right. Vendera's book seems to be in more detail. Also, this might sound stupid but the CVT way causes occasional belching, haha. Again I'm not sure if I'm doing it right so I'll try Vendera's way and see if it still happens.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It does not take a lungful of air to hold a long note. With proper fold closure, a subtle constant pressure is all that is needed. Not a push but neither just the reflexive exhalation of normal breathing. In fact, it takes effort to inhale. To point, the diaphragm is an inhalation muscle. When it relaxes, we exhale. Expanded ribs can be a misnomer. I think it is more accurate to say that you should not exhale by compressing the ribs, such as by squeezing in your arms. Rather, your abdominals, not as hard as a crunch exercise, simply provide a solid support by not being totally lax. And, to that end, proper formant or twang configuration supports the phonation by providing resonance to make the note loud so that the feedback of your brain doesn't cause you to push more, plus the standing wave of a well resonated note acts as a cushion to counter balance pressure on the folds from above, as they experience pressure from below. It truly is, as Steven has noted, a balancing of muscles and pressure with each other. While one group of muscles becomes more active, another backs off. We probably have problems when we interrupt this balance. That's why I'm not all that concerned with always keeping the larynx low. Let the muscles do what they do best, balancing each other, as the body needs to balance air pressure above and below the folds.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The reason some coaches will say to think down when going up is that this will give an image of a gentle push down with the abdominals such as when one is on the commode. Just this gentle compression of the abdominals is what Vendera means by "power push" and mmemonically thinking down helps keep you from compressing the ribs. For we do not inhale or exhale with ribs and to do so inhibits breathing. It is why Christ was drowning while hanging on the cross. The ribs were imimobilzed by the position. Granted, in the expanded direction, but stifled nonetheless, as much as they might be stifled in another position. And he couldn't breath much as abdominals were strained to try and stand on his nailed feet to take the weight off of his wrists. Roman soldiers would break the legs of the condemned to prevent them from standing up on the nail, thereby hastening death. This was considered a humane act on the part of the centurions. That it was better to die quickly.

Sorry to digress.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gracias o Grazi, Raphael. And I should clarify the drowning comment. When you cannot exhale properly, you cannot expel the moisture from your lungs. This moisture, mostly water, condenses. Therefore, you have water building up in the lungs. The blocking of oxygenation through the lung tissue by means of a fluid barrier is the definition of drowning.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ron that explains a lot! I don't know much about fold closure but I can control pressure. I'll also start to add a hint of twang in everything. Thanks =)

I tried the Vendera breathing way and reread the breathing section in CVT. CVT actually explains the abdominal inhalation and I agree with the book in that it takes too much energy. After trying the abdominal inhalation yesterday I went back to the diaphragmatic inhalation today and I think I have more control.

@jonpall: ?? I'm not Danish either heh..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My mother's father was from Germany. Is that close enough? However, my father's heritage was english, irish, and scottish (don't ask me how they all got together.) I wish I could find the clan names. That way, I would have an irish plaid to wear, or a scottish tartan, depending on how I am feeling that day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello all!

I'm new to this site, and this is actually the first time I've heard of the CVT and Vendera breathing methods. Is that the same as breathing with your diaphragm? Does anyone have any video links they can recommend for a newcomer?

:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The diaphragm is an inhalation muscle, not an exhalation muscle. That is, you exert effort to inhale, and relax to exhale. But, by a slight toning of the abdominals, you can keep from pushing too much air, which helps balance the air pressure below and above the vocal folds.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...