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EisaCurry

Is a full head voice even possible?

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So the question I have today, is a full mix or head Voice an actual possibility?

I've been working on my breath compression for a while now and have had great results, but have one issue with tone.

So as far as progression has gone, the first sensation was no longer leaking air, then I went through stretching sensations in the lower area of the throat, which I assumed was related to CT stretching. Then I found that if I adjusted my placement into the lower pharynx, I could actually produce both high and low tones without ever needing forward placement or any of the super forward placement I had during twang training

There has been lots of tonal gains, like the ability to mix tones better and my head voice achieving a very piercy tone instead of the wide falsetto back when I wasn't compressing my breath.

But the one point of interest, Is that my head Voice in itself is "piercy", but I hear other people refer to a "mix" tonality as head Voice. So this is where I am getting these doubts. If I approach from my head voice, there's plenty of that piercy...upper harmonic sound but there's not that much chest energy. Where as if I go from the lower approach, there is a mix, but the lower harmonics are still clearly the louder ones. 

I'm very elated that I can mix tones better, but I also realize that my voice just doesn't like sitting anywhere between head dominant or chest dominant. Is it possible to get this 50/50 sound... at some point in the future. Because if it's not, doesn't that mean singers who are doing a full 50/50 tone are not actually using their chest voice to it's full extent?

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It's completely possible. "Piercy" is a result of too much twang, rather than the TA dominance you're describing that you want. Are you going through TFPOS? If so, I can describe to you how to use one of the onsets to develop independence between the head voice note and the amount of TA you bring into the mix. This will one up your belting range to however hug you can sing in head voice. And if it's too difficult at the moment, the other onsets can help you quickly overcome any issues. 

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I may be maximizing my twang with breath compression, but that seems to have been the only possible outcome of said exercises. If I sing in my head voice, it now feels like the top of the cords are vibrating and the bottom are tight and closed. This matches my results, because my upper tone is alwAys correct now, but now the body is missing. So I have to figure out how to loosen up the lower portion ... but I honestly have no idea what would do that. Placement adjustments seem to not help anymore.

I don't have the exercises.

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1 hour ago, EisaCurry said:

I may be maximizing my twang with breath compression, but that seems to have been the only possible outcome of said exercises. If I sing in my head voice, it now feels like the top of the cords are vibrating and the bottom are tight and closed. This matches my results, because my upper tone is alwAys correct now, but now the body is missing. So I have to figure out how to loosen up the lower portion ... but I honestly have no idea what would do that. Placement adjustments seem to not help anymore.

I don't have the exercises.

Like I said, you're using twang instead of the TA musculature. Very simplified, you're closing and lifting the glottis, which reinforces the head voice and can sound very piercing, nasal, or overly edgy without any real weight or chesty sound. What you want to be doing, in order to get the sound you're describing you want, is adding in TA.

There are multiple things to adds to approach this, again this is oversimplified. The larynx needs to relax or dampen, instead of lifting; the vowels need to modify to a more curbing or rounded position; your respiration or air pressure needs raised to help cause closure without lifting, volume that feels like it's coming from a push down in the lower abdomen or below the navel; you need to learn the sensation and coordination of activating the TA muscles separate from everything else; among a few other things. This would take more than a couple of lessons to show you.

TFPOS, avilable on this website, would help you learn to isolate, coordinate, and strengthen everything you need to make this happen.

After learning the difference in sensations, and gaining enough strength and coordination, for each part of the voice, I often start my students through an exercise that first find the right soft palate pitch position in head voice, then slowly add in TA for the desired coloring, then properly add volume. This exercise almost immediately adds another half to full octave to their belting and "mixed" range. 

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And you could have paralysis by analysis. You found a way to sing with a tone you found more pleasing and now you are worrying about other definitions and maybe ask yourself, "I am doing this right?"

Rule #1 - if it does not hurt and you can sing with endurance and a pleasing sound, it is probably good.

I have seen any number of debates and I have lots (I mean lots) of books on singing. And every single one of them is based on the semantics of a word, as well as the personal musical prejudices of whoever is the author.

In fact, I have seen armchair experts crap all over Celine Dion (and no, I don't really care if anyone here is a fan of her music, or not,) and she sings fine and has plenty of gold records to show the fact that a large number of people paid hard-earned money to hear her sing.

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This comment may seem out of context, but i need to say it. Quit worrying about what is headvoice and what is mixed voice and all this voodoo hoodo. Dont get me wrong its good information.....but it docent matter as much as you think it does. As a singer and especially as a beginner the most important thing to focus on is being able to sing relaxed and without strain on low and high notes. Doing your lib bubbles or resonate tracking exercises everyday building the cordination and muscle memory. Focus on your one voice as a whole.

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I also agree with Jarom. For right now, thinking about head voice may help you but don't let it distract you from the end game. Because eventually, later, you will reach the zen state of not needing that distinction anymore when you have achieved the one voice. I got my one voice as a prize in a box of cracker jacks. But, you get my point ...

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39 minutes ago, VideoHere said:

Work the falsetto voice.  Don't worry if you sound female or operatic.  Work out that section and it will get stronger (over time.)

Seek out rich falsetto songs to sing.  All kinds! 

This, right here, I think is important and a lot of guys are unwilling to do it. It's not that they can't, but they won't. Trust me guys, there is a reward at the end of that road.

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Exactly, learn some Bees Gees, 4 Seasons, Beach Boys, early Jackson 5,....sure I'm missing others....sing some songs in just falsetto taking it all the way down and up and driving it all around.  After a while you will feel it get very "specific" instead of airy and loose, it will become tonally more focused and more solid, like it's inviting in the head voice.

For the younger folks check out the Beach Boys music.  Their voices moved in and out of falsetto with such quality and precision.

 

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And it's good to come back to those songs, now and again. Just the other day, I was singing that song.

"Well, you can tell by the way I use my walk I'm a woman's man, no time to talk..../ ...Staying alive......"

And I don't care if I get weird looks. Who is going to stop me and how do they expect to do that?

:headbang:

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Training has been fruitful on me, I also achieved the one voice sensation :) , and I don't worry about bridging now, it happens on its own if I just use MY correct vowels and sing with intention. Whenever I try to lower the volume or energy too much to see "how far can I take it", yeah, it cracks... but that's an awesome example that the voice wants and needs a base level of energy to function properly at any particular range.

The best advice I can give you is the same as Bob's. Work the hell out of your falsetto. To me it's the most important and fun thing to do, and also, it's essential to any kind of singing to warm up those muscles. The heavier you wanna sing, the stronger your CT has to be ( to stretch the now stiffened TA ) , and if you sing only in falsetto, you still need to warm up and work the coordinations. 

So 1) use YOUR best bridging vowels to work on your voice and stability and 2) Work the hell out of your falsetto.

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11 hours ago, Xamedhi said:

Training has been fruitful on me, I also achieved the one voice sensation :) , and I don't worry about bridging now, it happens on its own if I just use MY correct vowels and sing with intention. Whenever I try to lower the volume or energy too much to see "how far can I take it", yeah, it cracks... but that's an awesome example that the voice wants and needs a base level of energy to function properly at any particular range.

The best advice I can give you is the same as Bob's. Work the hell out of your falsetto. To me it's the most important and fun thing to do, and also, it's essential to any kind of singing to warm up those muscles. The heavier you wanna sing, the stronger your CT has to be ( to stretch the now stiffened TA ) , and if you sing only in falsetto, you still need to warm up and work the coordinations. 

So 1) use YOUR best bridging vowels to work on your voice and stability and 2) Work the hell out of your falsetto.

By base level you mean a minimum and maximum?

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By base level I mean a minimum energy that will be required to "mix", or to engage the TA musculature. The "maximum" limit, like if I want to be louder or sound more chesty, has developed in time.

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6 hours ago, Xamedhi said:

By base level I mean a minimum energy that will be required to "mix", or to engage the TA musculature. The "maximum" limit, like if I want to be louder or sound more chesty, has developed in time.

okay you said lower the volume or energy, thought you said raise the volume or energy at first.  So you're talking about the lowest energy where it might flip, crack or break approaching a vocal fry almost.

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26 minutes ago, Xamedhi said:

It doesn't resemble a vocal fry at all though, in sound. Maybe in the "tight" and "sealed" sensation, but not in sound. 

well it doesn't take much to go from a vocal fry to a full mixed sound.  Maybe my voice just has alot of vocal fry in it, I have a very tight throat and can do growls and such easily.

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On 9/2/2016 at 2:34 PM, Draven Grey said:

It's completely possible. "Piercy" is a result of too much twang, rather than the TA dominance you're describing that you want. Are you going through TFPOS? If so, I can describe to you how to use one of the onsets to develop independence between the head voice note and the amount of TA you bring into the mix. This will one up your belting range to however hug you can sing in head voice. And if it's too difficult at the moment, the other onsets can help you quickly overcome any issues. 

?... of course!  Get a training program ... a good one that actually shows you how to do train it... and a good coach on top of that if you can afford it and start practicing. If your not training to do it, it will not happen for you. 90% of the population will NEVER sing well in their head voice unless they take the time and commitment to get a program and train. So, the answer is, absolutely... and if you are able to do it or not, the choice is yours... start training.

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