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Falsetto tires me out quickly

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forgivendays
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I was just struggling through a song. Then I left out the falsetto parts and I didn't tense, clench, or anything (It also affects my chest voice). I'm talking about airy falsetto; not the adducted, slightly-pushed one (head voice?). I also get a light burning sensation doing exercises like falsetto slides. Falsetto is a huge part of my singing and I wanna be able to do it effortlessly. Any tips or ideas?

Thanks

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I guess I still don't understand falsetto..sorry.

If falsetto is light and airy, I don't see how Frankie Valli and Lou Christie could be considered falsetto singers, because their sound was loud & mixed sounding to me, with little or no air escaping. (showing my age there :( )

Anyway, I'm having same problem with n my head voice, though it gets better by C5. Too much air getting out, and me running out of breath.

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@Carol M: CVT's way of categorizing the voice is more accurate IMO. I haven't really spent much time understanding their "modes" but I'm pretty sure falsetto in CVT is called neutral. There are two types of neutral: soft-closure neutral and compressed neutral. I think this is a more accurate way of describing the "falsetto register".

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I don't really know about the other two, but Matthew Bellamy isn't especially airy. I'm not entirely sure what he is doing. And I read somewhere even he has started to show signs of fatigue (or maybe he's just preserving his unique voice), and lets a few high notes out of his shows. I assumed, as you specifically mentioned " airy falsetto ", that you were going for, well, some kind of whispery singing :p

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That's the thing. I'm wondering if there's a way to train that. He obviously sings much more than I do but I tire out much quicker (when using falsetto). Jaime Vendera said that the way to train endurance is to practice 5-6 days a week and your voice will become stronger. I'm wondering if that's also the case with falsetto. If I should keep tensing up and getting that tiny burning sensation until I get stronger.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZjxskTrSz0

The type of falsetto I'm talking about is like what he's singing at 1:00

also

at 0:46

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practicing 5-6 days a week seems pretty intense. My former vocal coaches have always cautioned me against overtraining for fear of damaging my vocal cords. But I suppose that as long as your throat doesn't hurt and your voice isn't hoarse, you're good?

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Hey Morid,

I'm a huge Muse fan, and I spent some time trying to get a sound similar to Matt Bellamy's.

He does use a slight amount of air on the lower neutral notes, and maybe in the studio as an effect. Watch him sing live though--as he gets some range going, the sound becomes powerful and compressed.

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@Carol: There's an exercise called the falsetto slide by Jaime Vendera where you slide from falsetto chest. He said that for that exercise you need to make your falsetto sound tiny and not airy. Then he said that sound makes some people think they're in head voice but they're really still in falsetto. My point is that there are several sounds that are achievable in falsetto.

@Goldenvoice: I guess it depends on your practice routine. Watch from 1:28

He has some great tips.

And yeah Spectrum I've noticed that. The compressed notes actually don't tire me out quickly.

I think for now I'll compress the sound a little and gradually add some air.

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Actually, I'm a guy who sing everyday, I sing airly falsetto almost every time.

On a train, in lessons, walking on the streets.

But they are not proper practices.

just singing some songs that I like.

But then, I still get tired easily.

Now lets investigate.

If I sing that for about two hours, I get tired.

My voice still doesn't hurt, and doesn't hoarse. Just abit itchy.

I can get over it by drinking water. And resting for hours.

Is it same as your case?

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Yeah definitely. My throat burns a little when singing in falsetto. It doesn't hurt but it's an annoying feeling and after it my throat clenches and strains for the rest of the song. I usually drink some water and take a break for 3-4 minutes when that happens. I obviously can't do that if I'm singing live so I need to work on this.

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The reason you tire quickly is you are trying to get you to get your sound by tensing your throat. I can hear the tension. High notes, whether falsetto or or full voiced get their sound through placement. By this I mean where you feel the resonance. Generally, the higher the note the higher and more forward in your head your placement should be. The throat should always be as relaxed as possible. The voice is moved by control of the breath. Every time you "pinch" your voice you make it work to hard. My suggestion to you is find a classically trained teacher with a degree who knows the rock style and take some lessons to fix the problem. I'm not saying your not good, in fact your quite good, but have some bad habits that a trained vocal coach could fix. Remember a classical tenor is expected to sing to high C full bore with out a mic and still be heard over and orchestra. Classical singing has centuries of experience at doing this with out hurting themselves behind them.

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Logankeller; singing for two hours? Falsetto or not, singing for two hours is going to make anyone tired. The average headliner show is 90 minutes to 2 hours, with breaks here and there for the lead singer.

Now, 3 or 4 minutes and there's a burning sensation? Either something is not right of the muscles are not yet acclimated. Then, again, I don't think I've ever sung a song falsetto all the way through, with the average song being 3 to 4 minutes.

Then, again, I have lived in Texas since 1974 and there is a slight twang to the accent so, there's no telling how much that has influenced my voice.

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I guess I still don't understand falsetto..sorry.

If falsetto is light and airy, I don't see how Frankie Valli and Lou Christie could be considered falsetto singers, because their sound was loud & mixed sounding to me, with little or no air escaping. (showing my age there :( )

Anyway, I'm having same problem with n my head voice, though it gets better by C5. Too much air getting out, and me running out of breath.

hi carol..."falsetto" is without a doubt the most confusing term in the world of singing.

it's guaranteed to confuse...the best way to approach it is to consider falsetto as being characterized by no or incomplete vocal fold closure. steve fraser, am i right?

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hi carol..."falsetto" is without a doubt the most confusing term in the world of singing.

it's guaranteed to confuse...the best way to approach it is to consider falsetto as being characterized by no or incomplete vocal fold closure. steve fraser, am i right?

Bob: That is one popular definition. A second is phonation without any Thyroarytenoid activity.

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