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Vocal exercisers/Programs

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D.Starr
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I've been using Singing Success for a fewmonths and just can't seem to get along with it.

Recently got the CVT program and gunna get into that pretty soon. I just really wondered if there were anything you guys could recommend for me.

I'm more swayed towards the Pop/R&B side of music. I understand that m any excersises can be used for all types of music just I was looking at James Lugo's Vocal Asylum and saw a few people saying it's more for rock and metal singers.

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There are many, many vocal programs out there. Some better for some people, some not so good.

I've also tried some SS exercises a few month back and their were not cutting it for me either. But. Yes the big 'but': The problem seemed to have been fundamental errors I have been doing for years. So even though I thought I (thats a mouthful?) were doing the exercises right I really wasn't. I've corrected some things, still more to go, and when I do my own versions of the same exercises I picked up, they now seem to work much better.

From what I remember of SS is if you hit the cd's and start practicing you will miss some huge starting pointers, perhaps especially naturally low voiced, people have no clue what to do with.

And those are (to name a few I know): Breathing, Support, Relaxing of muscles, Tongue and vowels.

I did the exercises without knowing these and I got sore after 20 minutes, tops. I first thought it was because I had "weak" muscles but as soon as I started consciously work at the above problems I can suddenly perform the same exercises for an hour, feeling tired instead of sore.

The good thing about breathing, support and tongue is that you can practice them quietly without singing. So you can go around all day long practicing without sounding like a loon.

Second: you must sing, sing and sing some more. And still enjoy it. To quote Jaime Vendera (freely): "Once a week at band practice will not cut it. Create a setlist of five or more songs you rotate every few weeks. And sing through the whole list every day". Singing scales has no meaning unless you do it to improve your pitch in a song etc.

Without challenging Steven Fraser's posts length, I'd rather not spread too many beginner experiences and just advice to try to get the fundamentals right before hitting the "gym". Or at least get the feel so you know what's going on, and why you keep doing an octave slide on an "ee" and not an "ah" at that particular note.

You will notice there are similarities in many vocal programs and they all stem from some few big ones such the likes of "bel canto" etc (saw the big three the other day, forgot which post).

I'd say take what works from the parts you like and make your own exercises based on the songs you sing, and will sing. Add to the challenge every day to keep it interesting. Simple recipe but complex ingredients.

And here's Jaime, encouraging you to write your own set-list.

Cheers

Fred

PS. Almost, but not quite, overshot the point here didn't I? I was going to say whatever vocal program you use they will teach you how to sing a note, feel it and give you clues and exercises how to make it, well, more beautiful (as in resonance, tone, pitch etc). Whatever singing style you slap onto that note is almost irrelevant as it is up to your own choosing. If you study opera you can use that booming power and spit out metal vocals with it I am sure.

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D.Starr: My recommendation is not to go looking around and buying another program, but put that money towards getting a couple of lessons, be it one of Brett Mannings's associates, Robert Lunte here or one of his associates, or another qualified person. I did SS for a while, and getting a couple of lessons from Jesse Nemitz at Brett's studio made helped me make significant progress. I moved to Robert Lunte's Four Pilliars and have had probably 12-15 lessons with him over the past year. Nothing can replace having a knowledgeable teacher diagnose what you are doing. I had my first session with Robert in about two months (been extremely busy), and he showed me a new move that is taking me into completely uncharted territory, a place that I never would have found myself if I had relied just on his CDs. I live in Hawai‘i and used Skye for both. Works great.

Just my 2 cents.

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Hmm that was a lot of text I pushed out at 4 am. I second getting a vocal lesson. Chanteurmoderne here showed my a couple of things over skype a few weeks ago. In 30 minutes I had finally understood what I've been trying to tackle for months and months and I could hit the exercises much better.

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I did have a local vocal coach for a good month or two, paying for half and hour lessons that were taking me nowhere.

Warm up > Sing 2 or 3 songs > warm down. Rinse repeat next week.

He did tell me I need to support myself and push from my stomach but that made no difference, but from what I have been studying for awhile about various other attributes to singing he never mentioned anything and seem to simply be running with my money.

I have been considering taking some lessons but money is scarce at the moment.

@Fred: that was far from enough text. I find myself hating to read large amounts of text, but you must if you want to learn, and I thank you very much to explaining more to me.

@keoladonaghy: Like I said I did have a coach but not a very good one. It is very hard to teach yourself how to sing especially if your a beginner. Vocal lessons over Skype is something I might look into as I live in the UK.

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I've been using Singing Success for a fewmonths and just can't seem to get along with it.

Recently got the CVT program and gunna get into that pretty soon. I just really wondered if there were anything you guys could recommend for me.

I'm more swayed towards the Pop/R&B side of music. I understand that m any excersises can be used for all types of music just I was looking at James Lugo's Vocal Asylum and saw a few people saying it's more for rock and metal singers.

i have found the key (assuming, like me, you can't swing the bucks for one-on-one vocal lessons) is the core basics done almost every day consistently and regularly

mental visualization (so much of this is mental)

setting goals....i want to extend my range, i want a more resonant vowel whatever, you get the idea.

water, water, water

good diet

sleep!! enough sleep is so important

lip bubbles

scales

arpeggios

sirens

gugs and gugs

ng

falsetto slides

messa di voce

tongue outs

lugo may be marketing to rockers, but his program is full of fundamentals.

folks, i don't want to come off like a wise ass here, but you gotta work at this shit, it's really hard sometimes, it's full of plateaus, set-backs, it can be tiring, frustrating, and progress can be slow!!!! at times.

you need stamina and guts and patience

..i hate when these voice programs make it seem so easy...it's not that easy...it can be really difficult because so many things have to be in balance.

ya hear?

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i have found the key (assuming, like me, you can't swing the bucks for one-on-one vocal lessons) is the core basics done almost every day consistently and regularly

mental visualization (so much of this is mental)

setting goals....i want to extend my range, i want a more resonant vowel whatever, you get the idea.

water, water, water

good diet

sleep!! enough sleep is so important

lip bubbles

scales

arpeggios

sirens

gugs and gugs

ng

falsetto slides

messa di voce

tongue outs

lugo may be marketing to rockers, but his program is full of fundamentals.

folks, i don't want to come off like a wise ass here, but you gotta work at this shit, it's really hard sometimes, it's full of plateaus, set-backs, it can be tiring, frustrating, and progress can be slow!!!! at times.

you need stamina and guts and patience

..i hate when these voice programs make it seem so easy...it's not that easy...it can be really difficult because so many things have to be in balance.

ya hear?

Thank you very much.

I've now made a setlist of things to run through from now on and we'll how I progress.

I'm interested in finding out what exercises I can do towards breathing and support.

I read further up the thread there are a few exercises you can do whilst simply walking around. I heard of the "sss" exercise but don't know much about it.

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Well I don't have many but one I try is just to keep my ribs expanded and exhale very slowly. I was walking home from rehearsal just now and trained all the way, an hour of trudging snow and slush. It's really tricky to not stiff up, inhale or raise the shoulders while you are walking. You stiff and muster some support only to find your ribs are collapsing like a popped balloon. And when you are sitting in a chair you can flex the ribs, back and forth like a 'butt-up'. Only with support.

Found most of the support things here http://forum.completevocalinstitute.com/viewtopic.php?t=7368

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Thank you very much.

I've now made a setlist of things to run through from now on and we'll how I progress.

I'm interested in finding out what exercises I can do towards breathing and support.

I read further up the thread there are a few exercises you can do whilst simply walking around. I heard of the "sss" exercise but don't know much about it.

look right here on the forum and go on youtube and you'l have your choice of those more than willing to share their knowledge. take advantage.

good exercises to develop breath support

lip bubbles (a gauge for it too)

sss exercise

dog pant

ha ha's (must be warmed up and open before you try these.)

now get busy and learn lol!!!!

0

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The sss and vvv (and lip bubble too in some way) are for feeling the "pressurizing" of air which is part of support. The idea is to raise/expand the ribs and open up the glottis by relaxing. In this way you are pressing air against the lips instead of the glottis.

They are only exercises and crutches so the idea is to get used to the feeling so you can do it on an open breath, and then finally add tone. The lip bubble does other things too, so it's a keeper even though you get the hang of the suppressed sss, vvv and th--. It's warming up the lips if anything hehe

I catch myself closing my glottis after inhaling all the time. This is what I've been doing at the gym for 8 years and how I used to whisper so for me it's one tough nut to crack. When I get it right I totally understand the description of "floating" a note up in your mouth and project it outwards instead of pulling it up with muscle. As a beginner when I sing, and the vowels and consonants are whizzing by, it's extremely difficult to make it all balance up. That's why I exercise. Daily. It's a complete makeover of my life in fact :)

I'm not too far off right? The collective mind bring us all to enlightenment.

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