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Why Are Male Keys So Difficult For Me To Sing ?

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So I've been singing for several years now and I've a pretty okay grip on how to use different techniques when I need to. I'm a male to give this some context and I wouldn't say I have a high voice. If anything, my voice is low, not deep but low. I know this because whenever I sing with others, I can always hear a huge difference between our voices. A few weeks ago, we recorder a song in school with over 16 voices in a room, I was on the furthest end from the recorder but yet my voice was still stood out because it was lower that everyone else's. 

Again, my voice isn't deep and on a good practise day, I can hit high notes for example the chorus of I Have Nothing and if I push hard enough, I can sing Let It Go up till the final belt. Yet, I find myself in an impossible position to sing songs from mostly male singers. It's not that the notes are too low, but because it's too high ( ? )

What I mean by this is take an Ed Sheeran song for example, I might start off pretty okay but immediately when the chorus hits, I can't seem to find the right key and when I do, I have to nearly screech to hit the notes. 

Another example is Say You Won't Let Go by James Arthur, I sing the verses perfectly well, but when it enters the prechorus, I can feel my veins in my neck squeezing so hard just to hit the note. This might be a bad comparison because it is a pretty hard song to sing. 

Or even Luke Bryan or Andy Grammer, both these singers are one of my favourite male singers but it pains me because I can't even sing 1 of their songs. When I listen to their songs, they don't even particularly start singing high notes but for some weird reason I can't find the right key to it. I always end up singing lower than the original and strain my voice real hard to the point where it doesn't even sound good. 

I don't really know if there's some key that I'm not hearing or something but it baffles me that I can choose to sing Ariana Grande but can't sing Blake Shelton because it's too high. 

I would really love some insight into this problem as it makes me really hard to harmonize with in groups and I would really like to be able to sing with other guys instead.

 

Another thing to add is that I don't have a bright voice, I might be able to sing Let It Go or Defying Gravity on key but those would never be my performing choices as I only use them as comparisons and range practise. My most comfortable and natural tone sits on a more depressing ( ? ) tone. What I mean by that is that I don't sound cheery or about to bust out singing Broadway. Perhaps this might be a reason to why I can't seem to sing some of the " male " songs because I can't mimic the same tone that some of them tend to have. 

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On 11/22/2017 at 4:15 PM, SingingDoughnut said:

So I've been singing for several years now and I've a pretty okay grip on how to use different techniques when I need to. I'm a male to give this some context and I wouldn't say I have a high voice. If anything, my voice is low, not deep but low. I know this because whenever I sing with others, I can always hear a huge difference between our voices. A few weeks ago, we recorder a song in school with over 16 voices in a room, I was on the furthest end from the recorder but yet my voice was still stood out because it was lower that everyone else's. 

Again, my voice isn't deep and on a good practise day, I can hit high notes for example the chorus of I Have Nothing and if I push hard enough, I can sing Let It Go up till the final belt. Yet, I find myself in an impossible position to sing songs from mostly male singers. It's not that the notes are too low, but because it's too high ( ? )

What I mean by this is take an Ed Sheeran song for example, I might start off pretty okay but immediately when the chorus hits, I can't seem to find the right key and when I do, I have to nearly screech to hit the notes. 

Another example is Say You Won't Let Go by James Arthur, I sing the verses perfectly well, but when it enters the prechorus, I can feel my veins in my neck squeezing so hard just to hit the note. This might be a bad comparison because it is a pretty hard song to sing. 

Or even Luke Bryan or Andy Grammer, both these singers are one of my favourite male singers but it pains me because I can't even sing 1 of their songs. When I listen to their songs, they don't even particularly start singing high notes but for some weird reason I can't find the right key to it. I always end up singing lower than the original and strain my voice real hard to the point where it doesn't even sound good. 

I don't really know if there's some key that I'm not hearing or something but it baffles me that I can choose to sing Ariana Grande but can't sing Blake Shelton because it's too high. 

I would really love some insight into this problem as it makes me really hard to harmonize with in groups and I would really like to be able to sing with other guys instead.

 

Another thing to add is that I don't have a bright voice, I might be able to sing Let It Go or Defying Gravity on key but those would never be my performing choices as I only use them as comparisons and range practise. My most comfortable and natural tone sits on a more depressing ( ? ) tone. What I mean by that is that I don't sound cheery or about to bust out singing Broadway. Perhaps this might be a reason to why I can't seem to sing some of the " male " songs because I can't mimic the same tone that some of them tend to have. 

 

Are you maybe singing the female songs an octave lower than the actual pitch? In Let It Go, for example, Idina Menzel ends the "Let the storm rage OOOOOOOONN" on an Eb5, which is a very difficult note already for females to hit. If you can sing it as a guy you won't have any problems singing Blake Shelton or Ed Sheeran (most of Ed Sheeran's songs only go up to like an A4).

Unless you're really singing an octave lower, so you'd be hitting an Eb4 on Let It Go. You would still be singing in key but it wouldn't be the original pitch. The note Eb4 should be singable for almost all guys, with or without vocal training. You might be squeezing a bit to hit that note in your chest "belty" voice due to bad technique. If that's the case then it makes sense that Ed Sheeran would be too high for you.

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On 11/22/2017 at 6:04 PM, JonJon said:

a wild guess:

you are singing falsetto on the high stuff. Then when you try to sing in your regular chest voice you start to struggle when it gets too high

ya was my first guess too

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