Jump to content

I need some tips on bridging

Rate this topic


D.Starr
 Share

Recommended Posts

OK.

So I'm working my way through trying to strengthen my voice and do the right things.

In my opinion I have a good voice in both "Chest" and "Head/Falsetto" voice.

But smoothing out and brdiging between the area that flips/cracks is frustrating.

I know that it can take some time to practice and perfect, but I'm having difficulty understanding the sensations and other things I should be doing.

At times I can achieve a smooth transition with slightly frying when I do scales, but at time when singing this just doesn't work.

I was wondering if there was a way you could describe a certain exercise or a way you find good to smooth out the flip and make a smoother transition from "Chest" and "Head/Falsetto" voice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK.

So I'm working my way through trying to strengthen my voice and do the right things.

In my opinion I have a good voice in both "Chest" and "Head/Falsetto" voice.

But smoothing out and brdiging between the area that flips/cracks is frustrating.

I know that it can take some time to practice and perfect, but I'm having difficulty understanding the sensations and other things I should be doing.

At times I can achieve a smooth transition with slightly frying when I do scales, but at time when singing this just doesn't work.

I was wondering if there was a way you could describe a certain exercise or a way you find good to smooth out the flip and make a smoother transition from "Chest" and "Head/Falsetto" voice.

i happen to love this exercise from a cd from rodger kain...

starting in high head voice sing, as high as you can comfortably "koo" as in "cuckoo clock" on a descending scale as low as you can go while keeping the head voice configuration when you feel like you can smoothly transition into chest voice do so and take that as low as you can. then you can try the other direction, low to high.

a stacatto koo, hard to explain with just words, but figure 2 koo's per second speedwise.

the goal is to transition as smoothly as possible so that the change of voices is imperceptable.

you can do the exercise two ways: softly and powerfully. the book and cd is available and very affordable. but note roger kain is for power vocals. the exercises are very intense.

bob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Practicing an exercise to manipulate the soft and hard palette within the mouth has helped me out quite a bit in bridging.

Essentially:

* Take a deep breath

* Pick a comfortable range and sing the alphabet from A – Z with your teeth clenched together.

* Repeat the exercise alphabet, only this time with your teeth slightly apart

* Sing the alphabet with the jaw pulled back

* Sing the alphabet with your jaw pulled back as far as possible

* Sing the alphabet with your chin raise as high as possible

* Sing the alphabet with your chin moved as forward as possible

I know its kinda basic, but its helped me develop a better understanding of mouth positioning to smooth out those transition points.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

I do not recommend oos and ees. They are closed vowels and will make you constrict in your high belts and into your head voice, not unless you want to be singing in Falsetto or a windy phonation and most people dont want that. In fact, to practice really great bridging, you need the open vowels; Oh, Eh, Ah are good... but the best 'preferred' training vowel is "eh" as in Meh. Now then, once your training on the proper vowel... you must work on sirens.

The Vocalist Studio DVD training system, "the four pillars of singing" offers two very important siren workouts early in the program that immediately begin to help the singer learn to bridge the registers. Learning to bridge properly has everything to do with two things; timing and placement. Sirens trains these two critical muscle memory coordination.

Here is a video sample of one of the 35 audio tutorials that comes with the 35 TVS vocal workouts, it is called, Melodic 5th Sirens:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=grkoc0kTqFw

This is not a Maestro Kyle workout, only 11 out of the 35 vocal workouts my vocal athletes and I train on are Maestro Kyle. In order to get these sirens correct, you have to have your onset correct and you need to learn laryngeal dumping. Two things I can really explain in a form post, need to show you in person. If your interested, I can show you exactly how to do it. www.thevocaliststudio.com/internet-lessons

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...