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DisgustingVoice

So tired of being a baritone

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Whenever i listen to a (*auto edit*) baritone i just want to fall asleep. Baritone singing sounds so boring. It's the biggest curse ever. God gave you a great deep voice yet you can't (*auto edit*) use it for singing. I would sacrifice my whole family for a tenor singing voice and i'm not exaggerating. Tenor voices sound (*auto edit*)  amazing. Super interesting. My baritone voice sounds like shit. Singing a D4 is hard for me. I can't believe. Can reach G5 in falsetto but it means nothing. I want to be  able to (*auto edit*) reach it in chest voice. Might kill myself i'm serious.

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Well, first of all, let’s relax. Way too serious.

Second, why did you say this?

1 hour ago, DisgustingVoice said:

God gave you a great deep voice yet you can't (*auto edit*) use it for singing. 

 

And this?

 

1 hour ago, DisgustingVoice said:

Tenor voices sound (*auto edit*)  amazing. Super interesting. 

 

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Start training, and you can sing high. It will take a lot of special training, but it can be done.

it takes a lot of special training for tenors too. 

Your biggest problem isn’t your voice , it’s the simple fact that you will not make the training commitment required to do it. That’s your problem. It’s on you man, not your voice .

Stop whining, real singers don’t do that either.

 

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19 minutes ago, Gsoul82 said:

Well, first of all, let’s relax. Way too serious.

Second, why did you say this?

 

And this?

 

 

A baritone speaking voice is great (although Bass is better for that), however for singing it's the worst thing ever.

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8 minutes ago, Robert Lunte said:

Start training, and you can sing high. It will take a lot of special training, but it can be done.

it takes a lot of special training for tenors too. 

Your biggest problem isn’t your voice , it’s the simple fact that you will not make the training commitment required to do it. That’s your problem. It’s on you man, not your voice .

Stop whining, real singers don’t do that either.

 

It takes lots of effort for me to even reach a D4.

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I have no sense of what a note is so when i sing a normal song i usually sing it an octave lower. At least that's what i did until recently. I found out through an app luckily. So for years i've only used my lower register. Getting to a C4 was hard for me until two weeks ago.

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45 minutes ago, DisgustingVoice said:

I have no sense of what a note is so when i sing a normal song i usually sing it an octave lower. At least that's what i did until recently. I found out through an app luckily. So for years i've only used my lower register. Getting to a C4 was hard for me until two weeks ago.

Think about how you’re framing that. You are singing a “normal song” an octave lower. Songs are built for that singer’s voice. What’s normal for them isn’t normal for you. That even goes for two people with the same voice type. 

1 hour ago, DisgustingVoice said:

A baritone speaking voice is great (although Bass is better for that), however for singing it's the worst thing ever.

Yeah, you’re essentially repeating yourself though, lol.  Why are they bad for singing? 

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5 minutes ago, Gsoul82 said:

Think about how you’re framing that. You are singing a “normal song” an octave lower. Songs are built for that singer’s voice. What’s normal for them isn’t normal for you. That even goes for two people with the same voice type. 

Yeah, you’re essentially repeating yourself though, lol.  Why are they bad for singing? 

A baritone voice is bad because it sounds too boring and quite monotone while tenors sound more colorful.

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Man there is no tenor or baritone range. If you can’t sing a D4 then you would suck equally as a tenor, maybe at D#4. Plenty of tenors can’t sing high it’s a matter of skill.

 

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48 minutes ago, Felipe Carvalho said:

Guess no one told that to Coverdale...

Or Scott Weiland, Sully Ema, Peter Gabriel, Aaron Lewis, Chris Martin, Dean Martin, Ivan Moody, Jim Morrison Greg Graffin, Jimi Hendrix, Marcus Mumford, Wille Valo, Eddie Vedder, Levi Stubbs, Paul Simon...Hell, the list goes on. "Mick Jagger; John Lennon, Chris Martin, Bruce Springsteen, Liam Gallagher, etc." was already said before contradicting the statement with  "a baritone voice is bad because..." 

@DisgustingVoice, If you're not willing to learn and train, then are you here simply to troll? The claims in your first post suggest that, on a Tristan level. Why are you here?

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3 minutes ago, Draven Grey said:

Or Scott Weiland, Sully Ema, Peter Gabriel, Aaron Lewis, Chris Martin, Dean Martin, Ivan Moody, Jim Morrison Greg Graffin, Jimi Hendrix, Marcus Mumford, Wille Valo, Eddie Vedder, Levi Stubbs, Paul Simon...Hell, the list goes on. "Mick Jagger; John Lennon, Chris Martin, Bruce Springsteen, Liam Gallagher, etc." was already said before contradicting the statement with  "a baritone voice is bad because..." 

@DisgustingVoice, If you're not willing to learn and train, then are you here simply to troll? The claims in your first post suggest that, on a Tristan level. Why are you here?

Most of them sing in tenor ranges and all of them would be better off as tenors.

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2 hours ago, Electric said:

Man there is no tenor or baritone range. If you can’t sing a D4 then you would suck equally as a tenor, maybe at D#4. Plenty of tenors can’t sing high it’s a matter of skill.

 

If i were a tenor, i could easily sing these notes.

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1 minute ago, DisgustingVoice said:

If i were a tenor, i could easily sing these notes.

Thats what most tenors think before learning to how to use their mid-high range :)

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8 minutes ago, DisgustingVoice said:

If i were a tenor, i could easily sing these notes.

Not guaranteed at all! And you would have other challenges you don't have as a baritone.

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2 minutes ago, Felipe Carvalho said:

And some *boring* baritone range stuff for your appreciation:

 

 

I really do not want to sound like i'm hating on Baritones for no reason. It's just that overall i consider tenors to be superior.

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10 hours ago, DisgustingVoice said:

It takes lots of effort for me to even reach a D4.

And that is part of your problem. It is not about "Effort" singing the notes. It is more about relaxing muscles that get in the way. It is said that Singing in headvoice actually takes less effort and Air than using falsetto. Trying too hard brings more muscles that are not needed and gives less control to ones that are needed. 

You are actually beating yourself up for the wrong reason. High Baritones and baritones in general are the ones that have more character in their voices than true Tenors. They have more frequencies that can be generated and controlled.

Let's take a few tenors, Peter Cetera, Steve Perry, Christopher cross, Geddy Lee....... Just try to imagine them singing anything from Aerosmyth, Deep Purple, Bad Company, Bob Seger, ...... Most of the time to get any thickness to the voice they have to use some kind of distortion or doubling of the vocal track in the recording.

Baritones can sing those high notes, it is a matter of training to get control over your voice and tenors have the same problems when it comes to the passaggio notes. Sure it may seem easier when your full voice already sounds like falsetto but you get more control with the full voice than you can get with falsetto.

And on that note( pun intended) If you can sing an E5 in falsetto you can sing an E5 in full voice(full being connected head voice, not meaning shouting).

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7 hours ago, DisgustingVoice said:

If i were a tenor, i could easily sing these notes.

I think your perception is a little mixed up. You just said up there that you want to sing a G5 in chest voice, as if that’s what tenors do. I’m not an almanac of singing excellence, but I don’t know any full-grown man with two nuts to his name who is doing that, lol

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Guest A baritone, not a coach

K. Heres the thing youre gonna need time and patience, but most importantly practice and experimentation that will often times be frustrating. You need to first develop good support, that is balanced and resonant without the need to push and youre gonna need to learn to go from a chest based chest voice and put it up into your head cavity.Switching on the flip of a dime is more or less what it feels like to go from chest to mix. Inhalare la voce, appogio, and messa di voce, are concepts that are key  to this as well, and you should definitley work with them. Your chest voice and your head voice must be both devleoped to their fullest natural range and capacity. This is usually from F4-G4 in Chest voice or as much as you can pull up there and up to G5 in Head voice which is good. Your brain needs to learn those two combinations in order for your voice to start "growing" After youve mastered both you will need to begin blending the registers. It is important that you also understand that in order for your cords to vibrate freely you have to control your larynx, your tongue and your jaw, and they shouldnt be allowed to tamper with the free vibration of your cords.First off you will need to be able to sing the highest notes of your chest voice, as softly and delicatley as possible. Making your chest range become softer often times this means that you will need to do so in a very Mike Posner ish kind of way. Once youve been able to sing those head based chest notes, and being able to early on, make your A3-D4 area soft instead of louder and seamless instead of ascending your chest voice with grit you will be learning to soften and actually reach those notes with the least amount of pressure necessary to achieve them and relying on the natural resonance of your head cavity instead of trying to get that loudness through your muscles which you shouldn't do. From here on you have to start to little by little be able to (Like in a siren exercise) be able to go yawn from your chest straight into your falsetto without breaking. And since youve developed your high chest range to be as mirky and soft as your falsetto, the qualities between will be so similar that it will become seamless. Over time your voice will go back and forth from chest to falsetto with ease. After youve practiced this for enough time and your chest range is not tense little by little you will be able to put a little more of resonance into your falsetto and softness into your chest. Once this has become a habit for you, what you will want to do is little by little push up the comfort zone and instead of trying to get to higher notes by making that hollow profound bel-canto like belting scream, you will want to put all the air up into your head and as you ascend you will want the sound that youre doing to sound more like a shriek or a squeaking door. Dont think that youre singing but rather, crying or whining on pitch. Its this crying quality that will differentiate ,yet connect your chest from your head. Instead of going up as youve been going up this whole time, you will begin to learn to cry into the next note , being as whiny and squeaky as possible. This will sound ugly as hell for a very long time, but these high pitched squeaky noises are the  untamed begininngs of your mixed voice. Like in the normal siren exercise your will try begin with a very whiny and bratty yuhhhhhhhhh in your lower chest range, and ascend or flip up to the top of your range with an aaaahh-ooooooo with your tongue pressed slightly against your teeth, and dropping the jaw as you go up. But dude, search more mixed voice exercies like the bratty nay, etc. feeling the twang and that brattiness up top of your forehead and putting all of the air resonance up to it  without any tension from your intrinsic muscles will yield more of a grounded yelping that will feel like your falsetto when you do it but will have the weight youre aiming to feel.. Once youve developed the ability to flip from your two registers seamlessly your voice will build an automatic response that will guide your chest voice to not actually go higher, but to taper off as it goes up, becoming thinner and weaker the more you go up but still being present in the notes youre singing. Little by little as you continue to learn to use the airflow and the correct head placement and connect your voice you will be able to give more weight to those weak top areas until they finally sound like belts.The very subtle compression you'll be adding to your vocal cords throughout this process is really the hardest part to figure out, and i encourage you to research compression and always aim for the lightest amount of it possible, so you always push your boundaries little by little. Soon you will create the auditory illusion that your pure chest voice is mamoth-sized and you will be able to sing incredibly high notes including those in the fifth octave in a coordination that will actually allow you to traverse your original range without a hitch and then some. As you go up the scale when singing words you will need to learn about modifying your vowels and tuning formants. I warn you however that this will feel very unnatural for a very long time, because its a kind of coordination you are not used to you will reach them thinking they will be whiny cries as you'd normally do in falsetto, instead of your usual chest pulls, and if youre relaxed enough and your vocal cords are strong enough with training, you will get the grip of the cords just the right amount and turn that ugly ass sound into a very well volumed belt. Sadly this area of your  voice will never come off as natural and will presumably only help you add a couple notes into whatever chest you can already pull. A year ago I struggled to even get a G4 right since the Passagio E4-A4 area is always the trickiest and hardest part of the voice to sing in and to tranistion into and out of. But instead of tensing myself and trying to scream my way up there, I first connected my chest and head voice seamlessly, played around with the weight and compression, and did the ugliest and most unpleasantly loud sounds known to man until I eased off and learned to use the techniques i mentioned before, and I got beautiful crystal clear vocal cord vibration with an exaggerated amount of low air pressure, and literally zero physical effort. I started playing around with the boundaries of my chest and head voice and their overlapping areas, and instead of breaking my voice actually started to get weighty instead of getting straight into falsetto. The cords naturally begin tapering off my chest voice instead of breaking into falsetto and with zero intention or effort I begin to accidentally sing B4s and C5's on accident. When I tried to repeat it I failed and realized that it must actually be so low effort and physical that I just wouldnt be able to get there if my intention was to reach those notes. So now im stuck in aimless squeaks and cries until finally I began to get those squeaks to turn into the notes above my chest voice and I currently can do these cries up to D5. It still is very thin, but in due time I'll be able to give it a more robust and grounded sound. And the thing is... The mixed voice is always naturally weak, thin, and heady and hard to even listen to. Once you guide your voice to go into these ugly shrills that have zero weight and to temper and control them, you can then begin playing with the volume and thus have a screamy sound that can be plugged seamlessly into your chest range. I now  apply these whiny and ugly cry  sounds instead of what I usually did to try to go up in chest voice, and now I can pull up to A#4 before going into full mixed voice, and it definitley feels like when I flip from chest to head voice. THAT EASY. This takes time ,patience, learning the kinds of things I mentioned, and a bunch of frustration but the only safe way youre going to be able to get up to that mythical C5 is to learn how to apply falsetto or head voice into your chest to get that very chesty squeak going.Afterwards you will find that from around C5-F5 Your voice will continue upwards becoming headier and  headier and end up right back in falsetto zone seamlessly at around F5-A5. Its that easy, everyone whose trained to reach these notes has tamed these very unusual and ugly sounds, and has gained the freedom and control to then add volume to them in a way that makes them sound like a female whimpering and then a woman belting or crying. The more I listened to tenors in pop deliver their highest tessitura songs, I began to listen that what i was actually hearing werent these chest fat notes I once percieved them to be, but rather the very thing, but well volumed and placed cries on pitch I myself had started to do, and I realized that what makes the tenor who he is, isnt the unnaturally high voice or the very heady qualities he naturally possess, but rather the ability to taper off and thin the voice in the connected way I mentioned. And since the cries always come from the ability to mix both chest and head, and not purley chest, I could finally explain why on some occasions singers could pull off really high-pitched notes only to then struggle to sing things that were then way much lower in the more arduous enviornment of the pasasgio and the pure pulled chest voice. Your favorite singers, simply know how to mix naturally or through training, which is why they are able to surpass the limitations of the baritone  and the male voice by efficiently mixing the ease and headiness of falsetto with the natural resonance and volume of the modal register.Their voices arent super high, theyre just super well coordinated. The more you get to make your singing efficient and low cost the more you will understand that going high isnt about putting weight, but dumping it out as you go up, and the higher go the lighter you should go to. I totally get your struggle since I too am a baritone who began three years ago with an F4 that I needed to choke on. I lived like that for another year, barley being able to pull chest up ta G4. But then in a single year that ive applied these things, i can already begin to try to control a good B4-D5 since at that point my voice has to behave completley diffrently and even though that is only half of the struggle when getting to sing actual songs with those pitches, im very proud of finding my mixed voice and the variants of chest and head that you too will learn to play around with. Theyre all low effort cries, but they take concentration and good airflow to get right. But Im not a coach and i only know very basic stuff so I'd suggest you learn these things from a proffesional and keep practicing hard. But most importantly don't give up. Today I have far more skill singing than I had before and im glad all those days where I couldnt go above F4-G4 didnt stop me from learning and practicing. These things go slowly and with time, but you can definitley stick the landing. Best of luck man

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