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Hi all. I think I’ve posted this in the right place. 

 

I have a question about Bruce Dickinson’s modern day vocal technique. In these clips below (at about the 2:05 and 1:52 mark) do you think that Bruce is singing in head voice or chest voice?

Im asking because in the original recording and early 80s live performances he sounds much more powerfull (obviously down to age) and less airy. 

 

 

 

The chorus of this is another good example of what I mean. (1:15)

 

 

Im hoping that if so, I will be able to use my head voice so sing these, and with enough practice it would hopefully sound powerfull enough to still sound semi decent since I dont have the natural range that Bruce seemed to have in the 80s and 90s. 

 

Thanks, Keir. 

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Anything above E4, for a man, is head voice. Do you mean connected to TA muscles (chest voice musculature)? I've never heard him sing without that connection, in a solid mixed resonance. Train with someone that knows how to get you this sound, like in The Four Pillars of Singing.

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5 minutes ago, Draven Grey said:

Anything above E4, for a man, is head voice. Do you mean connected to TA muscles (chest voice musculature)? I've never heard him sing without that connection, in a solid mixed resonance. Train with someone that knows how to get you this sound, like in The Four Pillars of Singing.

So you’re saying that Bruce Dickinson just has a very strong head voice to the point that it sounds just as loud as chest? Im not 100% sure on the different registers but am I correct in thinking this? 

 

Thanks for the reply btw :)

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2 hours ago, Atkinson The Bop! said:

No its not!

You can pull chest a small bit, but just because the TA muscles are still on does not make it chest voice. The TA muscles are mostly a chesty sound color at that point, causing thickness in the vocal cords. The voice is already bridging into a head voice register, and the TA's give it a nice mixed resonance. It's not light-mass head voice necessarily, but yes, it's head voice.

And I realize that E4 is a general statement. But a man's bridge is going to be around the E4.
 

2 hours ago, Keir118 said:

So you’re saying that Bruce Dickinson just has a very strong head voice to the point that it sounds just as loud as chest? Im not 100% sure on the different registers but am I correct in thinking this? 

 

Thanks for the reply btw :)

It may help more to think of it as mixed resonance above the E4. He's not using light-mass head voice in that range, just a TA connected voice. It's definitely not "loud head voice", but rather a solid mix of TA muscles for thickness and chesty sound colors along with good resonance amplification. Robert and I explain it more in this mini-course:
https://vocalathleteintensive.com/minicourse/

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depends if you are considering "head voice" as a certain range of notes or as a certain type of sound. A lot of people use "head voice" and 'falsetto' interchangeably....which is totally incorrect

I think most of us pretty much hate singing terminology because it is hopelessly inadequate but its all we have to work with lol

In any case Bruce isnt using "chest voice" to sing that high. So I think this is what Draven is pointing out. At those high notes its going to be some sort of "head voice". But not falsetto. So the trick is learning and training to make that head voice sound strong and powerful etc and not like the BeeGees (I love the BeeGees btw lol)

 

Another thing to consider. Its really hard to compare live stuff to studio stuff. For one thing, i think that live clip is way faster than the studio tempo. Thats gonna make it WAY harder to strongly articulate those lyrics etc

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41 minutes ago, Draven Grey said:

 

You can pull chest a small bit, but just because the TA muscles are still on does not make it chest voice. The TA muscles are mostly a chesty sound color at that point, causing thickness in the vocal cords. The voice is already bridging into a head voice register, and the TA's give it a nice mixed resonance. It's not light-mass head voice necessarily, but yes, it's head voice.

TA?

 

41 minutes ago, Draven Grey said:

And I realize that E4 is a general statement. But a man's bridge is going to be around the E4.

you mean a baritone 

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@Atkinson The Bop! I don't mean a Baritone, I mean a man's primo passaggio (bridge) is around the E4. I'm also not referring to vocal fach (which is generally unnecessary in contemporary voice), although that generality still holds true there too.  I'm very surprised you don't know what I mean by TA muscles when you seem so sure and confident in what note the Male primo passaggio is or isn't on. I did mention clearly what they are and do.

Edit: Baritones in classical tend to have a lower register, sometimes down to an A3. However, the classical technique used is quite different than the contemporary style we're talking about. For that, "around the E4" is a very safe bet.

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On 2/26/2018 at 2:38 AM, JonJon said:

depends if you are considering "head voice" as a certain range of notes or as a certain type of sound. A lot of people use "head voice" and 'falsetto' interchangeably....which is totally incorrect

You know what I have been practicing some stuff on the piano and I have learned I can do head voice in C3 and I can do cheast voice in F#5. Infact my teacher told me to do a C#5 note in chest voice and not in head. 

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24 minutes ago, Atkinson The Bop! said:

You know what I have been practicing some stuff on the piano and I have learned I can do head voice in C3 and I can do cheast voice in F#5. Infact my teacher told me to do a C#5 note in chest voice and not in head. 

Awesome! That's called bridging early and pulling chest, respectively. When you learn how to properly bridge and connect your voice, you can easily extend your bridging to a large range of notes.

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17 minutes ago, Draven Grey said:

Awesome! That's called bridging early and pulling chest, respectively. When you learn how to properly bridge and connect your voice, you can easily extend your bridging to a large range of notes.

you know I could of done most of this 6 months ago (if I had known). But until last Monday when my teacher said I would like you to do that song of C#4 E4 F#4 G#4 in chest voice and not head and I would like you to practice it on (once again) c major and minor chords. Well I can tell you at B5, C#5, D#5, E5, F#5, its quite a breathless pull and a half LOL

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On 25/02/2018 at 8:02 PM, Keir118 said:

Im hoping that if so, I will be able to use my head voice so sing these, and with enough practice it would hopefully sound powerfull enough to still sound semi decent since I dont have the natural range that Bruce seemed to have in the 80s and 90s. 

 

Without defininig a frame of reference it is not be possible to talk about this.

Yodel, and observe that your voice flips. You have one kind of voice that works better on lower pitch, another that seems useful for higher pitch.

Bruce is singing all the time on the lower *kind*. The other register will not be very useful to singing Iron Maiden except for some very high passages.

 

He does use different qualities when singing, which are related to vowel choices, intensity and support. On the more modern recordings, he often uses an overall lighter quality with more round vowels. On the earlier days he used to approach it all open and out, that's why it sounds more aggressive. And there are songs where you can hear both.

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