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Atkinson The Bop!

I Believe In A Thing Called Love

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He's singing highest notes in both falsetto and a slightly more connected falsetto, as well as a few "head voice" / "full voice" notes (the very highest notes).

at 1:23 he sings  every "day."  "Day" is sung in a solid head voice even though it's not one of the way high notes. That "day" note is actually harder to learn how to sing than the highest notes.

here's a video on that:

 

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agreed w draven. his belts arent full chest, as impressive as they are. we arent naturally meant to take chest up that high without incorporating some head voice, in which case, he'd be singing it in full voice.

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On 3/31/2018 at 5:37 PM, Draven Grey said:

No, it's not. That's silly to say.

why's that then?

 

On 4/2/2018 at 4:38 AM, axd218 said:

 we arent naturally meant to take chest up that high without incorporating some head voice,

but he is not a natural voice is he, he is a trained professional singer

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1 hour ago, Atkinson The Bop! said:

why's that then?

Twangy head voice is not chest voice. Pulling chest won't go nearly that high, and in fact only a few notes above the bridge at best. He's barely even bothering to mix resonance (head voice with the TA muscles contracted a bit for a chesty sound color) on the high notes. He's simply using a lot of vocal twang in head voice on a high pitch. He could add in TA musculature contraction for a weightier and thicker sound, if he wanted. But he's barely doing so, and much more focused on twang compression. Think of those high pitches as twangy head voice, with just a tad of TA muscle contraction, if any.

Up to the A4 (e.g. 1:23 "Day"), he's well mixed, using a bit of sob on the higher pitches, bridging and connecting very well.. In the prechorus, "you" and "me" are in reinforced falsetto. In the chorus, he sings in reinforced falsetto (resonant head voice, but light-mass) for the alternate stanzas. And then at the end of the chorus, he sings "I believe in a thing called love" with a lot of vocal twang in head voice, possibly with slight TA engagement.

I can sing those notes with a little TA or simply twang and get almost the same sound color. If I were coaching him in it, I would have him lean more into head voice or reinforced falsetto with a lot of twang, so he could be much more relaxed than when having the TA muscle contracted. There's not much need to purposefully contract the TA muscles in that range. Thus it's not a "full voice" either.

1 hour ago, Atkinson The Bop! said:

but he is not a natural voice is he, he is a trained professional singer

Nothing was said about him being a natural singer. Let's rephrase what axd218 said: It's physically impossible to have the TA muscles fully engaged that high, and thus he's in no way in "full chest voice" or pulling chest. For a man, the TA musculature has to begin tapering off from the A4 and up. For most men, even G4 is a strain on the TA musculature if fully engaged. 

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1 hour ago, Draven Grey said:

Let's rephrase what axd218 said: It's physically impossible to have the TA muscles fully engaged that high, and thus he's in no way in "full chest voice" or pulling chest. For a man, the TA musculature has to begin tapering off from the A4 and up. For most men, even G4 is a strain on the TA musculature if fully engaged. 

I remember we has a discussion on hear some where before Where I said I can fonate chest and head voice from C3-C5 and you said something like awsum this is called bridging early 

 

Another thing is I asked you what you where abbreviating by TA mussels and you just did not want to answer like it was some kind of top secret word

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11 hours ago, Atkinson The Bop! said:

I remember we has a discussion on hear some where before Where I said I can fonate chest and head voice from C3-C5 and you said something like awsum this is called bridging early 

Another thing is I asked you what you where abbreviating by TA mussels and you just did not want to answer like it was some kind of top secret word

A man cannot fully engage the chest voice muscles past A4 (secondary bridge) without a lot of strain (usually D5 for women), but you can mix in the chest voice (TA) muscles for a thicker and more chesty sound color while singing in head voice. I've said that in our conversations before too. Head voice is a range, chest voice is also a range, falsetto is a mode, bridging is a way to smoothly sing between chest and head voice without a break by slowly passing off dominance from one muscle group to another (for men, that pass off can happen anywhere between G3 to A4, and the TA muscles can be used for sound color all the way up to an A#5). I also defined what TA musculature is several times in that previous conversation, but I don't mind answering again and more fully. Thyroid Arytnoid (TA) muscles are the main musculature around your vocal cords, also known as your chest voice musculature.  When contracted, they thicken the closed quotient of the vocal cords, causing more friction, and a thicker, more chesty sound color. They are also the main musculature used in your chest voice range.

 

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On 4/3/2018 at 9:28 PM, Atkinson The Bop! said:

I remember we has a discussion on hear some where before Where I said I can fonate chest and head voice from C3-C5 and you said something like awsum this is called bridging early 

 

Another thing is I asked you what you where abbreviating by TA mussels and you just did not want to answer like it was some kind of top secret word

i think most ppl that are getting into singing get too wrapped up w 'head' and 'chest' voice. u rlly shouldnt differentiate the two becuz chances are, you instinctively incorporate head voice in your everyday life. think of the various times you 'whoop-whooped' every time u saw a cop pass by or called for someone from some distance away.

in a general sense, bridging is rlly just letting go of unnecessary TA involvement. i guarantee u that if u learn to let go a little on ur high notes, u'd be surprised at the tone and quality of your voice. im still surprised at the volume i sing at when i release some of that tension.

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