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A small vocal tip with huge benefits. My last video was about vowel anchoring and "up and over" to avoid vocal fatigue. This one is about finding "your voice" by choosing where that vowel anchor sits along the soft palate.

 

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Twang is a vocal mode (physical structure + acoustics) where the glottis closes and tilts forward, adding more edging acoustics (simply put). What I'm talking about here, although at a very basic level in order to keep it quick, is that resonance sits along the soft palate helps add edging or curbing acoustics to the voice. The tongue helps move resonance, and thus acoustic overtones, across the soft palate - or hold it in place, at least in part, like I mentioned about "vowel anchoring." Extreme edging or extreme vocal twang causes Quack vocal mode, which is different than nasal. Edging acoustics in general sound be described as resonating more at the front of the mouth/soft-palate - Quack would be more hard palate focused. Nasal sounds tend to originate at the back of the mouth and then up and into the sinus cavities, much like you feel when humming on an "ng" sound.

I plan to do a few more videos soon concerning the acoustics and tension of the voice, such as sobbing for higher notes, stabilizing lower notes, and even one on emoting. Then I have a few planned for grit and screaming distortions.

I wore the hat because the sun was out. You should've seen how washed out everything looked from how bright it was before I added a filter! The goggles are on the hat because I like them and my production group, The Silent Still, has ties into neo-Victorian stories and the Steampunk community, so they are part of the wardrobe I've built up over the years. Thankfully, I moved away from the crocodiles years ago.

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     I know the subject is just a quick answer and is mainly about resonance in singing, but, in my own experience when someone is trying to find "Their singing voice" it is more like the difference between James Taylor, Elton John, Bob Dylan (in voice character).  The same person can sound like either of these and when changing resonance as you propose what changes is just the brightness or darkness not the character of the voice.

      In my own case, I have three octaves available to me for singing but for the notes to be solid the character changes.Just for arguments sake let use Waylon Jennings as the bottom end, Willy Nelson as the middle and Neil Young at the top. And I can stay "Connected" by gradually switching through the three voices but to sound like the same voice from bottom to top does not work.

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@MDEW, I'm talking about a lot more than just tonality. While you can change tonality  this way, I was talking about choosing the underlining sound color of your voice, *including consistency across your range, by anchoring your vowels to one spot -- finding a sound color you like in general, and then forming all of your vowels in that single spot on the soft palate. You will still experience the pressure of the voice moving deeper into the soft palate and adding curbing overtones, but you want to stay tethered/anchored to the chosen vowel resonance anchor spot regardless of the other acoustics and physical modes happening with it. This will keep you consistent in  "your voice." 

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I'll make my next video put these last two together with a solid exercise and a bit more of an explanation of how they work together.

Consequently, changing your vowel anchor also changes your annunciation/accent a bi (which I believe I mentioned too). And as I said in the video, it tends to move other muscle groups, such as dampening or tilt of the larynx, without having to directly control them - thus changing the character of the voice, not just tonality.

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