Jump to content

Extreme tension in the throat.

Rate this topic


Stan
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hey guys!

I've been running into what is probably the only problem I have as far as technique goes. I can't get rid of tension in the throat.

Often when I sing, for support I inhale with the belly, pretend I'm inhaling as I sing... and push down using the gut. My voice is out

of my throat and I feel it vibrating in my face. Problem is, as I'm singing... I get this growing tension occurring in my throat area...

it almost feels as if my vocal chords are being squeezed but I am not clenching the jaw or anything... I'm just adding support by

pushing down, and in the middle of the sentence, I get this tense feeling in the throat. Anybody have an idea what may be causing this

and what I'm doing wrong? It's driving me nuts that I can't figure it out. I doubt it's support because I feel confident I got that down correctly.

I really appreciate your help guys! Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm just adding support by

pushing down, and in the middle of the sentence, I get this tense feeling in the throat.

It's possible you are using "lavatory support" and locking up in the throat. That fits the description you are giving. Try backing off on the downward push and think more navel toward the backbone as opposed to straight down. For me, it's a subtle but powerful difference.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't know if it matters but the only time I have been feeling tension, at least afterwards, is when I try a twang rattle. Then I lose part of my range for some days. I though I was over the latest strain after a few days, but it has lasted longer than that. Next time I want to try twangy rattle, someone, please, slap the snot out of me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Stan,

yes.

Of course, without hearing you sing, I'm only speculating(and even then I would only be speculating :) )

From what I've been taught, 2 things need to happen for active expiration:

1) The navel moves inward(continuous motion not locked)

2) The waistband moves laterally

If both of those are happening while "pushing down" then I would think you're fine(the image of pushing down makes me "lock my support" so I stay away from this...but that's just me.)

The other thing to consider is that you are not "letting go" of the downward push when you inhale. This can leave your body extremely tense and could possibly be causing you to constrict. If this is this case, you need to practice releasing any tension when you inhale(or practice the "elastic recoil" method.) If not familiar with that, I can elaborate further(most probably already been covered somewhere on this forum. I'll check.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks guys for your replies.

Analog...when I push down, my navel tightens and feels it moves outwards and not inwards (like sucking into the stomach). I thought this was a bad thing and thats what caused tension?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks guys for your replies.

Analog...when I push down, my navel tightens and feels it moves outwards and not inwards (like sucking into the stomach). I thought this was a bad thing and thats what caused tension?

You thought what was bad? Sucking in the stomach?

Try this:

Put your hand on your abdomen with your thumb at your navel and the rest of the hand below. Breathe out forcefully on a powerful 'PSHHHH.' Use your hand to send the abdomen right back towards the backbone. Don't worry about inhaling. Just do this forceful expiration + hand movement a few times.

At the end of the exhale, if you relax the abdomen, it will "bounce outwards" and you will have breathed in. It may take several tries to get it relaxed, but this is the foundation of the "recoil method." {Most importantly though is the exhale.}

One other area to explore is the epigastrium(epigastric region.) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Gray1220.png

If you look at the epigastric region on the chart, that area should go out while the abdomen around the navel goes in. From what I understand, as long as the epigastric area is engaged(moving out in a continuous movement,) your support is engaged(along with muscles at the waist and above the pubic arch.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hey stan, two things i thought of to add:

you're not inhaling to deeply? too deep an inhale will cause tension.

you're not holding your breath (even for a moment) at the top of the inhale?

thanks Videohere!

So I should hold my breath as I sing while maintaining downwards support?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks Videohere!

So I should hold my breath as I sing while maintaining downwards support?

an emphatic no!!

i said don't hold your breath...ever.

never hold your breath when singing. support is so hard to explain in words. but it provides you with a consistency in tone.

hope i've helped.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh okay I understand now...

No, I don't hold my breath and I don't take a lot of air in either.

Support is hard to understand, yeah... i'm still trying to master it.

thanks!

support to me, (just my opinion) is one of the major secrets to pro-level singing.

generally, it's much more subtle than you think. and it can be variable in application, depending on the particular piece you're singing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Stan - a common issue one might have is locking the jaw which can be the source of tension in the throat. If that's the case try moving your jaw freely a little bit while singing to make sure there is no tension in the jaw. It may unlock the tension in your throat. Just something to try.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a counter-intuitive pain in the buttinsky. You have some tension in the abdominals but they are not rigid. You are not massively pushing air but the air pressure below the folds will be subtley higher than above, so that the sound is actually created.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...