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PopVlad
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Hey Guys,

I was browsing though one of the Roger Love’s books (Set Your Voice Free) and stumbled upon the Octave Jump exercise.

Does any of you use it heavily in you practice routine? What are some of the benefits of such an exercise?

Personally, I feel that by doing the Octave Jumps I can carry the weight of my voice from low to high in a much safer and smoother way.

Would that be your experience with that exercise as well?

Thanks heaps,

Vlad

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"Octave jumps," or "sirens," as they're probably better known, are great, in my opinion. I started seeing quicker results when I started doing these. I start low and slowly raise up. It really teaches you to bridge. Robert Lunte, James Lugo and Jaime Vendera are big on these.

I bought Roger Love's book, but I found it to be pretty much another SLS course.

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Hey Jeran,

Thanks a lot for your feedback.

And just so I'm being clear, that's the kind of exercise I meant:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e2WlBpPK3oQ

The slightly shorter version is in the Roger's book along with googs and gugs, which ARE very SLS ;)

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Hey Guys,

I was browsing though one of the Roger Love’s books (Set Your Voice Free) and stumbled upon the Octave Jump exercise.

Does any of you use it heavily in you practice routine? What are some of the benefits of such an exercise?

Personally, I feel that by doing the Octave Jumps I can carry the weight of my voice from low to high in a much safer and smoother way.

Would that be your experience with that exercise as well?

Thanks heaps,

Vlad

i have used that cd. i especially like the workout in the muscles under the jaw on goog and gug with the cry sound.

regarding the octave jump, love's whole agenda is get you to find and develop "middle" voice. rob's not a fan of middle or mixed voice, but rather bridging and connecting chest to head..

both are valid methodologies.

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I use an octave jump excersize - the Ken Tamplin version - similar but not exactly the same as that video. It is designed to bridge chest to head. I try to do this excersize everyday if possible on the "ah" vowel. I think it is a great excersize. Connecting chest and head takes some subtle coordination turning on and off the TA muscle (slowly) while keeping the CT muscle active. Of course the natural tendancy is to turn on or off TA activity abruptly, which results in a "yodel". Normally we don't want the listener to detect when we go from chest to head so the carefull coordination of this muscle is important, and takes some skill, which is what this excersize is designed to help us with.

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The octave siren is sort of like letting of the clutch of a motorcycle. You have to let the clutch out AND give it just enough gas to go. You have to find the right balance of these two things to move forward. The octave siren, to me, is the same. It really teaches you to find the right balance of everything to allow a seamless transition into head voice without the yodel.

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I use an octave jump exercise - the Ken Tamplin version - similar but not exactly the same as that video. It is designed to bridge chest to head. I try to do this exercise everyday if possible on the "ah" vowel. I think it is a great exercise. Connecting chest and head takes some subtle coordination turning on and off the TA muscle (slowly) while keeping the CT muscle active. Of course the natural tendancy is to turn on or off TA activity abruptly, which results in a "yodel". Normally we don't want the listener to detect when we go from chest to head so the careful coordination of this muscle is important, and takes some skill, which is what this exercise is designed to help us with.

hi, guitartrek! You've described this pretty well. I'll add one other thought about what is going on at the laryngeal muscular level, and that is that the adduction is being tweaked, too, to maintain the ration of the open-to-closed phase. This is important in maintaining consistency of the phonated tone quality, and the overall vocal tone.

Well done!

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The octave siren is sort of like letting of the clutch of a motorcycle. You have to let the clutch out AND give it just enough gas to go. You have to find the right balance of these two things to move forward.

awesome analogy jeran. i like when we explain things more than just technically.

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Well that's what I learned from you! Can you explain the open-to-close ratio again?

Sure. Its about the time the glottis is open or closed each cycle. Each cycle is at the fundamental frequency. We usually refer to either the open phase (% of open time in each cycle) or the closed phase (% of closed time in each cycle). A big part of the consistency of tone is maintaining the ratio. If the ratio changes suddenly, its immediately audible. The ratio results from the interaction of the registration, the adduction, and the breath energy as they change over the range of the voice.

I hope this is what you had in mind.

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I use three of Roger Love's exercises every day including octave jump, but I don't think of it as a siren because it goes straight to the higher note then back down. I think of sirens as being a little more leisurely. It's actually easy to bridge up quickly but slowly is something else.

My favorite is the octave and a half jump, which I sometimes do legato for more of a bridging workout.

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