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Varied vocal ranges...

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LuiC345
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I stumbled upon a forum post about "So many programs, so much confusion". I wondered that, yes, that it is possible to extend your range. I mean, I used to have 1 octave, now I have like 2 and a half working on 3 octaves.

Singing Success had improved my tone and singing overall, not a big majority on range, but it did increase.

I wondered that let's say you get a baritone range, it's unlikely you can sing songs on tenor. Is that true?

Coz I try to sing songs that are nearly to tenor (when I'm a baritone which partly sucks).

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Yea there is tons on the subject scattered around the forum. I thought I was a baritone but I learned to position my tongue correctly and gained an octave and a half instantly. I don't sing anything else than tenor range stuff and it's working great. I think I have increased about a semi tone every week for the past two month on top of that.

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Im the biggest "baritone" success story... I was a classical baritone at the university... today, with modern technique I can sing tenor parts, in fact, Steve Fraser seems to think Im a tenor these days in my sesh with him. I wonder if a voice can actually modify from a baritone classification to a tenor classification by the standards of the Classical folks, purely by training... I know first hand, that extensive training will lift your speaking voice... Steve, any thoughts on this?

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I'm the biggest "baritone" success story... I was a classical baritone at the university... today, with modern technique I can sing tenor parts, in fact, Steve Fraser seems to think I'm a tenor these days in my sesh with him. I wonder if a voice can actually modify from a baritone classification to a tenor classification by the standards of the Classical folks, purely by training... I know first hand, that extensive training will lift your speaking voice... Steve, any thoughts on this?

Robert: The comparison of factors that combine into a 'baritone' or 'tenor' type get a little muddy when listening to the brighter baritone and the darker tenor. However, there have been a number of circumstances where a singer started out a career in one fach (classical voice type) and 'trained up'. One of the most famous of these in the latter half of the 20th Century was Placido Domingo, who premiered as a Baritone, and then at 28, began singing tenor roles.

At least in classical circles, what seems to be the differentiator is the tessitura... whether the singer can maintain technique through an entire role onstage, and sound well the whole time. Some roles, for example, are written to hang in the range from the D next to middle C to the G or A above that. We find them quite frequently for light tenor in the music of Mozart and Rossini, and for heavy, dark baritone in the music of Verdi.

For some singers, its a tossup. I know one professional singer who started on the stage as a high, agile bel-canto tenor, sang progressively larger and more dramatic tenor roles as he matured, and even did Verdi Baritone roles later. IMO, if the singer can sound well, and maintain tessitura, then it really comes down to what they like to sing :-)

As some have said, with contemporary music its not as essential, but with classical music there are established norms for tone quality. If you were still singing classically, I'd hear your voice being in that type of bari or tenor quality, and if tenor, leaning toward the Helden, or Tenore di Forza fach. I'd have to hear you sing Celeste Aida and Urna Fatale to make a more informed judgment.

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Though Steven is, of course, spot on correct about the tonal qualities of the various classifications, I would like to point out that Axl Rose is a bass, views himself as a bass, yet sings all through the tenor range.

And I still like Steven's definition the best. Your range is the area where you have the most dynamic control in volume and tone (I am paraphrasing, I think.)

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